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Diverge 2018

Old 10-22-17, 11:26 PM
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Originally Posted by rgr555
in general what's considered low weight for a bike? eg <20 lbs? 15?

as mentioned, depends on the bike type. My 56cm 2018 Diverge Expert was 19.7 with the SWAT box, a 2017 carbon Salsa Warbird is 19.3 lbs.

I have a Cannondale SuperX (54cm) that is a hair under 17 lbs, and a Roubaix Comp Carbon disc that is right at 17 lbs. My medium 2017 Cannondale Scalpel Si Carbon-3 is right around 24 lbs

Those are stock, so if you add some carbon bits you could get them down and extra lb or possibly even 1.5-2 lbs.

Last edited by sgtrobo; 10-24-17 at 10:12 AM.
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Old 10-24-17, 10:10 AM
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2018 Diverge Expert with Quarq power meter 44t, no pedals or bottle cages, including SWAT box
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Old 10-26-17, 03:06 PM
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Originally Posted by sgtrobo
I have a Cannondale SuperX (54cm) that is a hair under 17 lbs
How in the world is that under 17lbs? My Hi-Mod SuperX (54) is 19.5lbs with a light wheelset and not even fully built yet :/
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Old 10-26-17, 03:54 PM
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Originally Posted by shoota
How in the world is that under 17lbs? My Hi-Mod SuperX (54) is 19.5lbs with a light wheelset and not even fully built yet :/
carbon seatpost, handlebars, stem, Roval Control SL wheelset, set up single speed
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Old 10-26-17, 09:17 PM
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Originally Posted by sgtrobo
carbon seatpost, handlebars, stem, Roval Control SL wheelset, set up single speed
Well that makes more sense. SS hardly counts lol. Honestly, I was hoping to be around 17lbs geared up.
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Old 10-30-17, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by sgtrobo


2018 Diverge Expert with Quarq power meter 44t, no pedals or bottle cages, including SWAT box
Any idea how much the hover bars weigh? Specialized doesnít list their weight. Iím goin with 3T ergoterra bars and a 3T -17įstem. Also a Power Expert saddle. Iím guessing itíll end up a little below 19 without pedals
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Old 10-31-17, 07:26 PM
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Guys

Posted in this forum earlier regarding the ability of the Diverge alloy frame to take a clamp style derailleur. Nobody could directly answer my question but somebody referred me to Specialized and they replied that it would not be possible due to the oversize tubing.

What is advertised as a go anywhere bike, it's disappointing that both bike and component manufacturers are reluctant to allow users to modify bikes to make them suitable for the type of riding owners want.

Currently riding a 20 year old Cannondale CAAD4 frame and lowest gearing is 22-34. I am not the lightest nor strongest of climbers but sometimes I want to explore roads that look impossible to cycle. My current gearing, I am finding it is not possible to ride these extreme gradients. Would prefer 22-40 or possibly 42 or 46.

I love the spec of the Diverge Comp especially the Shimano Hydros, the Satin blue is the best colour in the range. Biggest problem, not a fan of Carbon. Second choice is the Comp E5 but it's got mechanical disk brakes, oxymoron in my opinion. Been using Shimano Hydros for almost 20 years, how can I take a massive step backwards? Spending the extra cash to upgrade is not financially responsible too. Currently stuck between and rock and a hard place on what new bike to buy. Diverge fits my needs to 90%. Like the idea of CGR seat post and Future Shock but they are not consistent throughout the range.

Can't buy a full-on race bike as my type of riding is all sorts of surfaces that a hybrid could tackle, do a lot of kerb hopping and riding rutted trails and potholed roads. Would be running 28mm or 30mm tyres and riding all day on 100+km rides.

If clamp style derailleur cannot be used, manufacturers should allow smaller cranks by facilitating a longer braze-on bracket to allow for more adjustment. Different riders ride different terrain and topography and where I live storage space is at a premium. It's a luxury to own more than one bike. I'd much prefer to own different sets of gearing and swap to which ever type of riding I am doing. I had hoped that the Diverge would allow this option. I would keep the bike stock for fairly level terrain and swap to adventure gearing as required.

Also the Diverge can be used for light touring; fender and rack mount provided, carrying extra weight and for hilly places, lower gearing would be of great use and advantageous.

Anybody else having this predicament decide which bike to buy?

Etops
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Old 11-01-17, 02:16 AM
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Originally Posted by etopsflight
guys

posted in this forum earlier regarding the ability of the diverge alloy frame to take a clamp style derailleur. Nobody could directly answer my question but somebody referred me to specialized and they replied that it would not be possible due to the oversize tubing.

What is advertised as a go anywhere bike, it's disappointing that both bike and component manufacturers are reluctant to allow users to modify bikes to make them suitable for the type of riding owners want.

Currently riding a 20 year old cannondale caad4 frame and lowest gearing is 22-34. I am not the lightest nor strongest of climbers but sometimes i want to explore roads that look impossible to cycle. My current gearing, i am finding it is not possible to ride these extreme gradients. Would prefer 22-40 or possibly 42 or 46.

I love the spec of the diverge comp especially the shimano hydros, the satin blue is the best colour in the range. Biggest problem, not a fan of carbon. Second choice is the comp e5 but it's got mechanical disk brakes, oxymoron in my opinion. Been using shimano hydros for almost 20 years, how can i take a massive step backwards? Spending the extra cash to upgrade is not financially responsible too. Currently stuck between and rock and a hard place on what new bike to buy. Diverge fits my needs to 90%. Like the idea of cgr seat post and future shock but they are not consistent throughout the range.

Can't buy a full-on race bike as my type of riding is all sorts of surfaces that a hybrid could tackle, do a lot of kerb hopping and riding rutted trails and potholed roads. Would be running 28mm or 30mm tyres and riding all day on 100+km rides.

If clamp style derailleur cannot be used, manufacturers should allow smaller cranks by facilitating a longer braze-on bracket to allow for more adjustment. Different riders ride different terrain and topography and where i live storage space is at a premium. It's a luxury to own more than one bike. I'd much prefer to own different sets of gearing and swap to which ever type of riding i am doing. I had hoped that the diverge would allow this option. I would keep the bike stock for fairly level terrain and swap to adventure gearing as required.

Also the diverge can be used for light touring; fender and rack mount provided, carrying extra weight and for hilly places, lower gearing would be of great use and advantageous.

Anybody else having this predicament decide which bike to buy?

Etops
22-46?
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Old 11-01-17, 05:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Ryder1
22-46?
This. At some point, the hill is so steep and your gearing is so low that no matter how easily you can spin it, you can't overcome gravity and you tip over backwards. This happens on slopes that can be pedaled with your 22x34 on a modern MTB. You could probably get steeper, assuming adequate traction, with more aggressive CX geometry, but anything beyond 22x40 is likely pointless (and 22x40 is silly, just to be clear).

That satin blue is the prettiest bike I've ridden. If I could have tolerated the superlow BB for the singletrack that I like to include in my CX rides, I might have gone for it. It is just about perfect otherwise, although I'd go for a 11-36t cassette myself. That's still way out of range for what you're talking about, but it's enough for my needs. If I feel a need to tractor up a wall, I'll bring my MTB.

Last edited by ATPAH; 11-17-17 at 04:38 AM.
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Old 11-01-17, 06:04 AM
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Originally Posted by ETOPSFLIGHT
Guys

Posted in this forum earlier regarding the ability of the Diverge alloy frame to take a clamp style derailleur. Nobody could directly answer my question but somebody referred me to Specialized and they replied that it would not be possible due to the oversize tubing.

What is advertised as a go anywhere bike, it's disappointing that both bike and component manufacturers are reluctant to allow users to modify bikes to make them suitable for the type of riding owners want.

Currently riding a 20 year old Cannondale CAAD4 frame and lowest gearing is 22-34. I am not the lightest nor strongest of climbers but sometimes I want to explore roads that look impossible to cycle. My current gearing, I am finding it is not possible to ride these extreme gradients. Would prefer 22-40 or possibly 42 or 46.

I love the spec of the Diverge Comp especially the Shimano Hydros, the Satin blue is the best colour in the range. Biggest problem, not a fan of Carbon. Second choice is the Comp E5 but it's got mechanical disk brakes, oxymoron in my opinion. Been using Shimano Hydros for almost 20 years, how can I take a massive step backwards? Spending the extra cash to upgrade is not financially responsible too. Currently stuck between and rock and a hard place on what new bike to buy. Diverge fits my needs to 90%. Like the idea of CGR seat post and Future Shock but they are not consistent throughout the range.

Can't buy a full-on race bike as my type of riding is all sorts of surfaces that a hybrid could tackle, do a lot of kerb hopping and riding rutted trails and potholed roads. Would be running 28mm or 30mm tyres and riding all day on 100+km rides.

If clamp style derailleur cannot be used, manufacturers should allow smaller cranks by facilitating a longer braze-on bracket to allow for more adjustment. Different riders ride different terrain and topography and where I live storage space is at a premium. It's a luxury to own more than one bike. I'd much prefer to own different sets of gearing and swap to which ever type of riding I am doing. I had hoped that the Diverge would allow this option. I would keep the bike stock for fairly level terrain and swap to adventure gearing as required.

Also the Diverge can be used for light touring; fender and rack mount provided, carrying extra weight and for hilly places, lower gearing would be of great use and advantageous.

Anybody else having this predicament decide which bike to buy?

Etops
I'd keep looking until you find exactly what you're after.

e.g. I did a google pic search, of 'gravel bike' and 'steel' and 'blue'; quite a few bikes came up e.g. the 2017 Masi CXGR Supremo (has Shimano hydraulics). Might find some ideas through those pics.

Re the suspension, you could get a standard bike and purchase a Shockstop stem for upfront, and a high-flex post like the Syntace p6 hi-flex or an Ergon CF3.
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Old 11-01-17, 06:09 AM
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Originally Posted by ATPAH
This. At some point, the hill is so steep and your gearing is so low that no matter how easily you can spin it, you can't overcome gravity and you tip over backwards. This happens on shipped that can be pedaled with your 22x34 on my modern MTB. You could probably get steeper, assuming adequate traction, with more aggressive CX geometry, but anything beyond 22x40 is likely pointless (and 22x40 is silly, just to be clear).

That satin blue is the prettiest bike I've ridden. If I could have tolerated the superlow BB for the singletrack that I like to include in my CX rides, I might have gone for it. It is just about perfect otherwise, although I'd go for a 11-36t cassette myself. That's still way out of range for what you're talking about, but it's enough for my needs. If I feel a need to tractor up a wall, I'll bring my MTB.
I did quite a bit of 'tractor up a wall' riding last weekend, over very steep and rocky terrain. My 36t cassette was plenty, with a 38t ring up front, at slow speed rock-crawling.
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Old 11-01-17, 08:27 AM
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Originally Posted by tangerineowl
I did quite a bit of 'tractor up a wall' riding last weekend, over very steep and rocky terrain. My 36t cassette was plenty, with a 38t ring up front, at slow speed rock-crawling.
Yeah, I've done some of that on my 34x32, although I have a 36t cassette awaiting installation to take the stress off on longer steep climbs. I could see someone going lower than that, but I can't imagine wanting a much lower gear than 22x34, even for bike packing.
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Old 11-05-17, 06:57 PM
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Hi All, Iíve searched all over the interwebs and have not found solid information about installing racks (rear and/or front) on 2018 carbon diverge. Have anyone figured this bit out?
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Old 11-06-17, 04:42 PM
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Originally Posted by itchan
Hi All, Iíve searched all over the interwebs and have not found solid information about installing racks (rear and/or front) on 2018 carbon diverge. Have anyone figured this bit out?
I've been running a rack on a 2018 carbon Diverge since August, including doing some off-road touring with light panniers. The lower attachment point is easy. For the upper attachment point, I switched the seatpost for an aluminum model then installed a Salsa Post-lock clamp on that (Post-Lock | Salsa Cycles). I looked at the clamp that comes on the aluminum Diverge and wasn't impressed that you have to remove the rack stays to adjust the saddle height. I think I prefer my Salsa post-lock and will keep it even if Specialized do make the integrated seatpost clamp / fender mount available for the carbon frames.
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Old 11-06-17, 04:51 PM
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Originally Posted by ETOPSFLIGHT
Guys

Posted in this forum earlier regarding the ability of the Diverge alloy frame to take a clamp style derailleur. Nobody could directly answer my question but somebody referred me to Specialized and they replied that it would not be possible due to the oversize tubing.

What is advertised as a go anywhere bike, it's disappointing that both bike and component manufacturers are reluctant to allow users to modify bikes to make them suitable for the type of riding owners want.

Currently riding a 20 year old Cannondale CAAD4 frame and lowest gearing is 22-34. I am not the lightest nor strongest of climbers but sometimes I want to explore roads that look impossible to cycle. My current gearing, I am finding it is not possible to ride these extreme gradients. Would prefer 22-40 or possibly 42 or 46.

I love the spec of the Diverge Comp especially the Shimano Hydros, the Satin blue is the best colour in the range. Biggest problem, not a fan of Carbon. Second choice is the Comp E5 but it's got mechanical disk brakes, oxymoron in my opinion. Been using Shimano Hydros for almost 20 years, how can I take a massive step backwards? Spending the extra cash to upgrade is not financially responsible too. Currently stuck between and rock and a hard place on what new bike to buy. Diverge fits my needs to 90%. Like the idea of CGR seat post and Future Shock but they are not consistent throughout the range.

Can't buy a full-on race bike as my type of riding is all sorts of surfaces that a hybrid could tackle, do a lot of kerb hopping and riding rutted trails and potholed roads. Would be running 28mm or 30mm tyres and riding all day on 100+km rides.

If clamp style derailleur cannot be used, manufacturers should allow smaller cranks by facilitating a longer braze-on bracket to allow for more adjustment. Different riders ride different terrain and topography and where I live storage space is at a premium. It's a luxury to own more than one bike. I'd much prefer to own different sets of gearing and swap to which ever type of riding I am doing. I had hoped that the Diverge would allow this option. I would keep the bike stock for fairly level terrain and swap to adventure gearing as required.

Also the Diverge can be used for light touring; fender and rack mount provided, carrying extra weight and for hilly places, lower gearing would be of great use and advantageous.

Anybody else having this predicament decide which bike to buy?

Etops
I'm running a 26-42 crank on my Diverge with an Ultegra Di2 front derailleur and an 11-32 cassette out back. It's far from ideal because I'm using a Shimano 105 5603 road triple crank (74/130 mm BCD) with no large chainring mounted, only using the inner and middle positions. To get the chainline far enough out, I had to switch the spacer from the LH to the RH side of the crank axle, so now the RH pedal is further out than the left. I've compensated by using two spacers behind the LH pedal and moved my cleat laterally, but it's not ideal. The chainline is only just sufficient for the FD to move the chain from the "middle" to small chainring.

It would be better if I could use a clamp-on front derailleur because then I could use XT Di2 derailleurs so that I could run an 11-40 cassette and then a regular 34/50 road compact crank, but you can't use an XT Di2 rear derailleur without the matching front derailleur, which can't mount to a braze-on attachment. I've tried the 11-40 cassette, Ultegra Di2 RD with a Wolf Tooth derailleur hanger extender, but the shifting on the smaller cogs is too compromised because of the derailleur being too far from the cogs in those combinations.
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Old 11-06-17, 05:46 PM
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Originally Posted by scotjonscot
Any idea how much the hover bars weigh? Specialized doesnít list their weight. Iím goin with 3T ergoterra bars and a 3T -17įstem. Also a Power Expert saddle. Iím guessing itíll end up a little below 19 without pedals
Ok, got bike,(Expert) love it. Absolutely hated the handlebars, but new that when I ordered it, and swapped a 3T -17į stem and their Ergoterra bars. I had a new set of 35 mm Gravel King SKís on my old CX Bike so I swapped tires as well. The 35 mm Gravel Kings actually measure very slightly wider than the 38ís it came with.(they measured 37mm, the gravel kings measure 37.5 on the stock rims)
I also replaced the saddle with the Power Expert saddle.

Anyhoo, with pedals, bottle cages and Garmin mount, but without swat box itís 19.42 lbs. Without pedals, Garmin mount, cages, and swat box, itís 18.4 lbs. When not racing, I only usually use one bottle and but my saddle bag in the empty cage. Similar idea to the swat box- keeping center of gravity low- but easier to move from bike to bike.
All in all, Iím quite pleased.
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Old 11-07-17, 05:05 PM
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Hi to everyone, I’m new to this forum and I’m looking for info about the Diverge E5 Sport. There are several reviews and videos on youtube about the higher end models with Future Shock but very little on the lower specced models.

I’m evaluating the Diverge E5 Sport as my first “serious” bike. I’m planning to use it for riding in my area (Italy, Venice area) that is plain but there are also mountains, woods and plateau. Being just starting out, the truth is that I don’t know exactly what kind of terrains I’m going to ride, but I’d like to keep all the possibilities opened. I’ve tried a few bikes around and I’m preferring lighter and faster gravel bikes vs bikes with iron frame and big tires. Basically I would like to have a bike that is fun on mixed terrain but that is not too slow or bulky on tarmac.

I’m quite sure about what I’m NOT gonna do: rides longer then a few hours (not for now at least) and technical or difficult paths that would suits better to a MTB.

Now the Diverge E5 Sport. The cost for me is just right for my first bike. I could also afford the E5 Comp but I’m not sure I will take any real advantage of the better specs. I’ve compared the E5 sport to others bikes I can buy in my area for the same money and for me it has the best value: new geometry, flat mount discs, Through Axle front and rear, mudguards and rack mounts. No other bike that I’m aware of (and I can buy locally) offers all this features for this price. Also Specialized is well supported by my local shop. Maybe I could buy something with Tiagra instead of Sora at the same price or near, but nothing more. Don’t see it as a big benefit.

Comparing the E5 sport to the E5 Comp, the E5 sport surely have something less:

- Future Shock: is it a must have for this Diverge? Does a 38 tires would give me the same amount of comfort as the future shock or would be night and day? My doubt is that this bike is built around it, and the same frame without the Future Shock could turn to be more uncomfortable than another “classic” gravel frame that use other ways to dump the road.
- 105 vs Sora: I’ve read the the new Sora is not bad at all. Probably the biggest advantage of 105 is to have more gears and less gaps between gears
- Weight of the wheels: The E5 Sport has the Axis Sport Disc, while the E5 Comp has the Axis Elite Disc. Don’t know how much differences there is actually
- Breaks: Tektro Spyre (Comp) vs Tektro Mira (Sport)

But the E5 Sport does still have some advantages:

- Color: both are uninspiring, but I slightly prefer the light grey of the E5 Sport (in Italy no black/red option)
- Upgradability: being the E5 Sport cheaper, I can think to add maybe next year the 105 group with Hydro Brakes. I would still miss the Future Shock, but I would have hydro brakes
- No futuristic gadgets. I have no experience with bikes but I’m not totally attracted by the future shock. It’s a sort of attraction/repulsion but I don't have any serious arguments in favor or against. It’s just by instinct.

Every posts I’ve read seems to agree that the E5 Comp has the bigger value for the money. Has the E5 Sport some chance to win for my use?
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Old 11-07-17, 09:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Eriksatie
Hi to everyone, Iím new to this forum and Iím looking for info about the Diverge E5 Sport. There are several reviews and videos on youtube about the higher end models with Future Shock but very little on the lower specced models.

Iím evaluating the Diverge E5 Sport as my first ďseriousĒ bike. Iím planning to use it for riding in my area (Italy, Venice area) that is plain but there are also mountains, woods and plateau. Being just starting out, the truth is that I donít know exactly what kind of terrains Iím going to ride, but Iíd like to keep all the possibilities opened. Iíve tried a few bikes around and Iím preferring lighter and faster gravel bikes vs bikes with iron frame and big tires. Basically I would like to have a bike that is fun on mixed terrain but that is not too slow or bulky on tarmac.

Iím quite sure about what Iím NOT gonna do: rides longer then a few hours (not for now at least) and technical or difficult paths that would suits better to a MTB.

Now the Diverge E5 Sport. The cost for me is just right for my first bike. I could also afford the E5 Comp but Iím not sure I will take any real advantage of the better specs. Iíve compared the E5 sport to others bikes I can buy in my area for the same money and for me it has the best value: new geometry, flat mount discs, Through Axle front and rear, mudguards and rack mounts. No other bike that Iím aware of (and I can buy locally) offers all this features for this price. Also Specialized is well supported by my local shop. Maybe I could buy something with Tiagra instead of Sora at the same price or near, but nothing more. Donít see it as a big benefit.

Comparing the E5 sport to the E5 Comp, the E5 sport surely have something less:

- Future Shock: is it a must have for this Diverge? Does a 38 tires would give me the same amount of comfort as the future shock or would be night and day? My doubt is that this bike is built around it, and the same frame without the Future Shock could turn to be more uncomfortable than another ďclassicĒ gravel frame that use other ways to dump the road.
- 105 vs Sora: Iíve read the the new Sora is not bad at all. Probably the biggest advantage of 105 is to have more gears and less gaps between gears
- Weight of the wheels: The E5 Sport has the Axis Sport Disc, while the E5 Comp has the Axis Elite Disc. Donít know how much differences there is actually
- Breaks: Tektro Spyre (Comp) vs Tektro Mira (Sport)

But the E5 Sport does still have some advantages:

- Color: both are uninspiring, but I slightly prefer the light grey of the E5 Sport (in Italy no black/red option)
- Upgradability: being the E5 Sport cheaper, I can think to add maybe next year the 105 group with Hydro Brakes. I would still miss the Future Shock, but I would have hydro brakes
- No futuristic gadgets. I have no experience with bikes but Iím not totally attracted by the future shock. Itís a sort of attraction/repulsion but I don't have any serious arguments in favor or against. Itís just by instinct.

Every posts Iíve read seems to agree that the E5 Comp has the bigger value for the money. Has the E5 Sport some chance to win for my use?
It sounds like you have done all the research and have all the information you need to make a decision. I was in the same postition and chose to save the money for the E5 comp and I am glad I did, for all the reasons you listed....better components, future shock, better wheels. I may have more bike than I need for now but dont have the limits of the sport. Good luck with your decision!
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Old 11-07-17, 09:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Chris_W
I've been running a rack on a 2018 carbon Diverge since August, including doing some off-road touring with light panniers. The lower attachment point is easy. For the upper attachment point, I switched the seatpost for an aluminum model then installed a Salsa Post-lock clamp on that (Post-Lock | Salsa Cycles). I looked at the clamp that comes on the aluminum Diverge and wasn't impressed that you have to remove the rack stays to adjust the saddle height. I think I prefer my Salsa post-lock and will keep it even if Specialized do make the integrated seatpost clamp / fender mount available for the carbon frames.
Are you running a standard off-the-shelf rack. I've got an old Blackburn Mtn Rack that I'd like to use with that same seat post clamp. Then all appears that it should work out well...
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Old 11-08-17, 01:05 AM
  #495  
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The rack I'm using is a RackTime Light-It, which is pretty standard.
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Old 11-15-17, 01:07 AM
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Hi guys. I got my 2018 Diverge two weeks ago and I am very happy about it. I jumped to gravel from MTB. I run the bike on Trigger 700x38 tyres. They are good but not suitable for wet and muddy off-roads in Central Europe between October and March. Have you got any suggestion for different tyres, please? Any experience and photos welcome. Does anyone use x42mm tyres? Thanks.
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Old 11-16-17, 06:35 PM
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Originally Posted by SacredZero
Hi guys. I got my 2018 Diverge two weeks ago and I am very happy about it. I jumped to gravel from MTB. I run the bike on Trigger 700x38 tyres. They are good but not suitable for wet and muddy off-roads in Central Europe between October and March. Have you got any suggestion for different tyres, please? Any experience and photos welcome. Does anyone use x42mm tyres? Thanks.
Specialized updated their mud-cyclocross Terra Pro tire to include a 38c version. I can confirm it's pretty doggone awesome for the slop.

In the 42c arena, I'm not entirely sure these have enough mud clearance, but some of the ones I'm going to be checking out:

Soma Cazadero 42c tire
Bruce Gordon Rock'n'Road 43c
Terravail Cannonball 42c
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Old 11-19-17, 08:00 PM
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Originally Posted by sgtrobo
Specialized updated their mud-cyclocross Terra Pro tire to include a 38c version. I can confirm it's pretty doggone awesome for the slop.

In the 42c arena, I'm not entirely sure these have enough mud clearance, but some of the ones I'm going to be checking out:

Soma Cazadero 42c tire
Bruce Gordon Rock'n'Road 43c
Terravail Cannonball 42c
I run Panaracer GravelKing SKís 35 mm for gravel, they
measure 38 on the Alex 24 wheelset. Much lighter than the triggers. They arenít the best in mud, but friends with the GravelKing Muds swear by them.
https://www.gravelcyclist.com/bicycle-tech/review-panaracer-gravelking-mud-tire/
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Old 11-20-17, 12:24 PM
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Originally Posted by scotjonscot
I run Panaracer GravelKing SKís 35 mm for gravel, they
measure 38 on the Alex 24 wheelset. Much lighter than the triggers. They arenít the best in mud, but friends with the GravelKing Muds swear by them.
REVIEW: Panaracer GravelKing Mud Tires - Gravel Cyclist: The Gravel Cycling Experience
how much room do you have with the GravelKing SK 35s? I know they blow up to something like 38 don't they?
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Old 11-20-17, 12:46 PM
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Originally Posted by sgtrobo
how much room do you have with the GravelKing SK 35s? I know they blow up to something like 38 don't they?
Yes, they measure VERY slightly under 38 on the slx24ís
Lots of clearance.
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