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Is there a fairly light 1" canti fork for under $100?

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Is there a fairly light 1" canti fork for under $100?

Old 10-10-17, 11:54 PM
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Is there a fairly light 1" canti fork for under $100?

As the title says. Does such a thing exist? I'm building up a frame for a friend and it has canti posts. Naturally I want to find a fork with them too. She's a tiny new rider, so I'm trying to keep this bike as light as possible.
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Old 10-11-17, 01:31 AM
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I'm sure you could find a good used chromo "touring" fork for cheap.

However, what about the Nashbar CF Cross Fork?

Nashbar Carbon Cyclocross Fork

Of course, there is always browsing E-Bay for the perfect parts too.
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Old 10-11-17, 09:42 AM
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How about a carbon disc fork, seems like a good chance to improve the front end braking for a new rider.
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Old 10-11-17, 09:50 AM
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I was going to say nashbar too. that is your best bet.

But I like the idea of swapping over to disks - although that would require a new wheel too...
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Old 10-11-17, 11:44 AM
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Originally Posted by shoota
How about a carbon disc fork, seems like a good chance to improve the front end braking for a new rider.
Front Disc/Rear Canti is not an uncommon configuration, and does make a little sense as one needs stronger braking in front.

The Nashbar fork above does support both disc & cantis, but then people have complained about the canti posts on a disc forks.

1" disc would be more rare on the the used market if one chooses that route.
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Old 10-11-17, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK
I'm sure you could find a good used chromo "touring" fork for cheap.

However, what about the Nashbar CF Cross Fork?
I could find a cheap chromo touring fork, but I don't think it's gonna be fairly light...

I was looking at the Nashbar fork, but a major bike guy I know keeps telling me how terrible AL steerers on carbon forks are, and pointing out that they recommend you replace them after a year or two or they could fail. I have no experience with them. Is he full of ****?
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Old 10-11-17, 01:22 PM
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Chromoly isn't all that heavy. But little weight differences do add up.

I haven't seen many notes about failing aluminum steer tubes. I think they've fallen out of favor more due to weight.

Many CF forks have an aluminum crown, and CF blades. Usually spotted due to large painted sections at the top of the fork. Looking at the Nashbar fork above, it is quite possible it has an aluminum fork crown that extends all the way down to the Canti bosses.

Threaded forks were limited by stock stem sizes, but a threadless fork can have a thicker steer tube, or perhaps use some kind of a butted engineered tube.

Of course, I can't say how the Nashbar forks have been constructed, but they have been on the market for several years, so there must be some on the road testing history.
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Old 10-11-17, 01:26 PM
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+1 on the Nashbar Carbon Cross fork. I abused the 1" version for many years without complaint. I think Winwood Muddy and Winwood Dusty were on my short list at the time. Not sure if you'd be able to find one of those kicking around.
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Old 10-12-17, 08:58 AM
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Originally Posted by 3speed
I could find a cheap chromo touring fork, but I don't think it's gonna be fairly light...

I was looking at the Nashbar fork, but a major bike guy I know keeps telling me how terrible AL steerers on carbon forks are, and pointing out that they recommend you replace them after a year or two or they could fail. I have no experience with them. Is he full of ****?
Yeah, full of it. Carbon can't take any type of impact. There are plenty of videos of pro riders going down because they had full carbon and their handle bars snapped off. That could be something as simple as over tightening the handlebar stem. The only problem for carbon steerers is a slight weight penalty. Generally the steerer and crown would be aluminum, and the legs would be carbon (with Al dropouts)

I and others have use the Nashbar stuff. Its pretty rugged.
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Old 10-12-17, 11:25 AM
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Strong, light, cheap. Pick two.
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Old 10-12-17, 05:25 PM
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Originally Posted by BluesDawg
Strong, light, cheap. Pick two.
Light and cheap. The friend riding this is a light weight newbie who will be doing easy miles on paved roads. Strength shouldn't be an issue.


Sounds like the Nashbar is the way to go. Thanks for the opinions.
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