Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational) This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like :The Dirty Kanza". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.

Favorite Gravel Tire

Old 10-04-18, 08:10 PM
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Hondo Gravel
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Favorite Gravel Tire

Many to choose from. What tires do you like?
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Old 10-05-18, 05:57 AM
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So much good to choose from. WTB Horizons because they are good over chunkier looser rock like ballast rock on old rail grades. I've also been enjoying a set of Soma Shikoro tires, and like those a lot for rides on smoother terrain.
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Old 10-05-18, 08:12 AM
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Vittoria Terreno Dry 40mm - https://www.jensonusa.com/Vittoria-T...oaAoVtEALw_wcB

Clement XPLOR MSO 40mm 120tpi - https://www.modernbike.com/product-2...YaAivSEALw_wcB


I have had Clement MSO 40mm in 120tpi for a few years now and love em. Fast rolling on pavement, dirt, and gravel. I wore thru a pair and got another pair a few weeks ago. 120TPI is a must if you run tubes.- lighter and more supple. There is a tubeless version under the Donnelly brand(same company and tire, Donnelly is just the new name).

I bought the Vittoria Terreno Dry 40mm tires based on suggestion here and due to someone i met and rode with shortly after the suggestion here. They are heavier than the MSO, but roll great.


Both have tread that is small and relatively tight packed vs large lugs spread apart. This means both are best for drier conditions and wont shed mud as well. but it also means they roll smoother.
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Old 10-05-18, 02:29 PM
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I'm currently using Compass Bon Jon's, which measure out at 37 and some change on American Classic Hurricane rims, and have used them for the past couple of seasons. They seem to be wearing fine, and I've had no issues on the gravel in my neck of the woods, er plains. I've run both extra lights, and regular, and really have had no issues with either. Since I use this bike for some touring as well, I appreciate that the ride is plush, and fast on pavement too.

I'm using the 32m size on a 2017 Diverge. They are measuring out about 33 on H + Son Hydra Rims. Neither of these is tubeless compatible (I know Compass now offers the Bon Jon's tubeless). My LBS suggests Schwalbe G-One if I want tubeless on the bike that will fit large tires. In a 32, these tires are quite fast on pavement. I of course can get bogged down on my gravel, which can be downright sandy at times, but these have been just fine for the most part. The rock is not particularly large, nor flinty.

I'm curious if anyone has tried WTB Exposure? Particularly in the 34 size? This one would give me enough clearance in the event of a bit of mud/rock sticking, so that I wouldn't have to worry about rubs on the seatpost. I've read that many are fine with 35's, but I'd prefer just a smidge more clearance than that behind...guess I could always go mis-matched on tires. Also, if running tubeless, since I have a herd of bikes I rotate through, how often do the tires need to be rotated? If it only sees one ride a week, is it worth the hassle of going tubeless?
Thanks.
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Old 10-06-18, 07:06 AM
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Terrene Elwood 650b x 47 are my current favorite. Most of the rides I do have conditions that vary from paved roads, hardpack gravel, loose gravel and singletrack trails. At 30-35psi, they are very supple and soak up most of the chatter. They have a more peaked profile, which lowers the rolling resistance on the road, but makes them wander a bit on loose gravel.

Those tires replaced the Gravel King SK 650b x 48 tires, which I really wanted to like because they were inexpensive. The Gravel King SK tires were great on hardpack roads and singletrack, but they had horribly high rolling resistance on paved roads. The side knobs were not knobs at all, but long continuous bars which were completely ineffective at giving any cornering traction.
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Old 10-12-18, 04:47 PM
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Very impressed with the Byways on my new bike. 650bx47. They hook up surprisingly well in the dry, loose, even at times sandy stuff we have here. Never thought I'd be riding a tire that looks so...slick.
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Old 10-12-18, 08:55 PM
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MSOs are my favorite all-around gravel tire. Can't wait for the gumwall version.
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Old 10-12-18, 09:24 PM
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Maxxis Rambler 40s. They came stock on my bike so I don't have much to compare them with, but I have no complaints. Fast rolling, easy to set up tubeless with the Giant stock rims. They don't shed mud well because of the closely spaced knobs but everything else has been good.

Currently available on sale at a decent price at Jenson USA: https://www.jensonusa.com/Maxxis-Rambler-700C-Tire

My rear is starting to wear down after about 3500km. Trying to decide whether to go with the Ramblers again or try something new.
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Old 10-12-18, 10:32 PM
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I'm currently really enjoying the Soma Calzaderos (made by Panasonic). They're a true 42mm width, which to me is pretty perfect -- wider than many, but not ridiculously fat. Bonus: I can fit them with SKS fenders on my Cross Check!
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Old 10-13-18, 12:24 AM
  #10  
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Vittoria Terreno Dry 40mm - https://www.jensonusa.com/Vittoria-T...oaAoVtEALw_wcB

Clement XPLOR MSO 40mm 120tpi - https://www.modernbike.com/product-2...YaAivSEALw_wcB


I have had Clement MSO 40mm in 120tpi for a few years now and love em. Fast rolling on pavement, dirt, and gravel. I wore thru a pair and got another pair a few weeks ago. 120TPI is a must if you run tubes.- lighter and more supple. There is a tubeless version under the Donnelly brand(same company and tire, Donnelly is just the new name).

I bought the Vittoria Terreno Dry 40mm tires based on suggestion here and due to someone i met and rode with shortly after the suggestion here. They are heavier than the MSO, but roll great.


Both have tread that is small and relatively tight packed vs large lugs spread apart. This means both are best for drier conditions and wont shed mud as well. but it also means they roll smoother.
Ive got the Terreno Drys, I think that they are a great tire for road/hardpack mix. Ive had them in coarse sand, wet grass, rough gravel and dirt roads. Handles well in all of that. Sheds the dirt/mud pretty quick once you hit the pavement again. Vittotia seems to use a softer compound in their rubber composition that gives the tires a nice feel. Im not sure on weight as I dont have another tire to compare to.

They were quite a challenge to get on the rim. It took a few attempts and finally a hair dryer to get them to loosen up enough. Vittoria calls them TNT tubes (Tube/No Tube) so supposedly you can run them tubeless. Probably why they are designed to be so tight on the rim. I got 4 of them for just under $30usd each with free shipping from PBK. Not a bad deal if you can wait two weeks.

-Sean



Last edited by Wilmingtech; 10-13-18 at 12:35 AM.
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Old 10-13-18, 07:07 AM
  #11  
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For what I do... Conti Speedride 42 (roughly 40-41 on my 23 wheels). Rolls great, lightweight, can be extremely comfortable and conforming at lower pressure or more responsive and still comfortable at higher pressure. The comfort and feel can be adjusted over a wide range to your liking with air pressure. Long life tread, traction everywhere except for mud but good enough on slime and peanut butter with care, the side knobs aren't just a novelty, they seem to help and last is they are very cheap. It's not tubeless and no way you'll get it to work that way. I've gone through periods of many flats and periods of none and I've also used them with tube liners with minimal reduction in comfort.

For more road than off road I like the Hutchinson Override 38c (roughly 40 on my 23 wheels). Rolls a little better than the speedride on road above 50psi but it is less forgiving at any pressure. More responsive on road but banana peels on slime and mud. It is tubeless and a well built tire. I'ved used it TL and with tubes and was close to same.

Funny is the Speedride is classified as an all purpose city tire by Conti and the Overide as a gravel tire by Hutchinson. My experience is they are better in the opposite rolls.

I have them both on different wheels and swap all the time. I've used them both on long pure road rides and both on multiday gravel tours like the GAP/C&O. Just about every ride including my routines involves a mix of road and gravel/dirt and I rarely ever finish a ride without some combination of a gray and brown coating.

My only other experience is the Nano. Didn't like it. There's a place for it but not for me. For those places I use my XC bike.

Last edited by u235; 10-13-18 at 11:44 AM.
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Old 10-13-18, 09:28 AM
  #12  
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The “gravel roads” outside my house in North, GA are actually paved but have a bunch of gravel on them too. I am working on a set of 28mm Continental Travel CONTACT for the roads, so I can save the WTB Nanos for Dirtier forest roads in the area.


WTB Nanos, may be over kill for my normal rides on paved roads that have gravel dumped on them regularly

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Old 10-13-18, 02:34 PM
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They are all good!

I rather like light and fast tires that accelerate and climb well.

Maxis Rambler are my goto for their weight, speed, and versatility.

Conti 4season (32mm) is my summer tire as our gravel is better than asphalt in the dry season

Schwalbe G-One for winter spring as they do great on frozen ground and in crappy weather.

Furious Fred – cheater tire – light, fast and high volume. It’s a 45mm tire (although labled as 50). If you don’t ride in flinty puncture prone areas – this one is hard to beat.

Thunder Burt (54mm). Makes my bike the lightest and fastest singletrack bike I have ever ridden (not for hard core trails, obviously).

The 60mm G-One speed is interesting. Very fast, but dangerous on mud or wet offroad conditions. Its great as a pavement (or sand) only tire.


I’m playing around with going large on the front only (because our forks can take bigger rubber up there). I’m really liking the results. That 2.0” Furious Fred will fit just about any modern bike (front), and is as light and fast as any tire from 32mm on up, but with some nice volume and some knobs for going sideways.

Fatter in the front gives me more traction, better drifting, more flotation, more stability (slower steering). Its nice (if I’m not on pavement most of the time).
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Old 10-13-18, 04:57 PM
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I'm almost embarrassed to say it but I run Continental Ride Tours, tubed and with a wire bead. They aren't the fastest, lightest or most supple tire out there but I don't have to worry about them. They'll take a lot of abuse and out in the middle of nowhere in Kansas, there are plenty of roads that chew up tires. I run them around 40 psi. Never had a flat using them. I'll never be on a podium and do ride by myself quite a bit, so I figure dependability is what I want more than anything. For tubes, I use Continental's touring tubes, which are heavier and more puncture resistant.
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Old 10-13-18, 10:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel View Post
Many to choose from. What tires do you like?
That's a super localised question and depends entirely on what you ride. MSO 40mm works great for the hardpack, lightly graded gravel/cobblestone like rocks and muddy tracks I've ridden.
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Old 10-13-18, 10:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Wilmingtech View Post
Ive got the Terreno Drys, I think that they are a great tire for road/hardpack mix. Ive had them in coarse sand, wet grass, rough gravel and dirt roads. Handles well in all of that. Sheds the dirt/mud pretty quick once you hit the pavement again. Vittotia seems to use a softer compound in their rubber composition that gives the tires a nice feel. Im not sure on weight as I dont have another tire to compare to.

They were quite a challenge to get on the rim. It took a few attempts and finally a hair dryer to get them to loosen up enough. Vittoria calls them TNT tubes (Tube/No Tube) so supposedly you can run them tubeless. Probably why they are designed to be so tight on the rim. I got 4 of them for just under $30usd each with free shipping from PBK. Not a bad deal if you can wait two weeks.

-Sean

What fenders are those? Is there a clip on for front tires? How effective are they? Are they more 'just in case' fenders or are they good enough for 'I am 100% certain I will be riding these in the rain for hours' type fenders?
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Old 10-13-18, 11:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Sullalto View Post
What fenders are those? Is there a clip on for front tires? How effective are they? Are they more 'just in case' fenders or are they good enough for 'I am 100% certain I will be riding these in the rain for hours' type fenders?
They are the SKS RaceBlade Pro XL's. They work great. I bought them because of the awkward rear triangle on this bike. Most other temp fenders would not fit because of the flatter angle of the seat stays. They have a lot of adjustment and take a little work to get just where you want them but once its dialed in they slip on and off pretty quickly with no more adjustments. Front and rear are both clip ons.

They are designed to cover up to 32c wheels. Mine are 33's inflated to 35 and they just barely cover my tires but work surprisingly well. Easy to slip on and pull off. I have had no issues with them. I have only ridden with them for about 50 miles in rain so far but they kept all the water off the bike and off my feet. No so much if you are hitting big puddles but for soaking wet roads and rain riding they are fine. They would be fine for long rides as well. The rubber handles the vibrations and they are pretty quiet.

-Sean

Last edited by Wilmingtech; 10-13-18 at 11:06 PM.
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Old 10-14-18, 05:51 AM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by dsaul View Post
Those tires replaced the Gravel King SK 650b x 48 tires, which I really wanted to like because they were inexpensive. The Gravel King SK tires were great on hardpack roads and singletrack, but they had horribly high rolling resistance on paved roads. The side knobs were not knobs at all, but long continuous bars which were completely ineffective at giving any cornering traction.
Funny, I find them fast on paved roads. I had bought them for this reason after hearing they were fast, and found that to be true. I guess this shows that everyone’s perspective is different and sometimes you can’t use feedback from the internet as “the” deciding factor.
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