Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational) This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like :The Dirty Kanza". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.

Rim recommendations for 35-44c tires

Old 03-14-19, 09:20 AM
  #1  
rumatt
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rim recommendations for 35-44c tires

I'm looking for rim/wheel recommendations for running 35-44 tires on my cross bike. I do NOT have disc brakes.

Currently I'm using Velocity A23 rims (18mm inner diameter). I find 32mm tire to be the sweet spot for those rims. I also tried 35 (both Panaracer T-serv) - it was OK but I wasn't in love. When I ran pressures low enough to be comfortable I found the 35's less pleasant than the 32 because of the extra side to side flop. People say I can run a 40mm tire on these rims but I can't imagine I will like it.

So I'm thinking a 22-23 internal diameter rim for 35-44c? Does this sound right? Any specific rim recommendations that have brake tracks so they work with my archaic cantilever brakes.

Or should I declare that this is a mistake to invest in this bike, and I need a new carbon fiber bike with disc brakes?
rumatt is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 10:44 AM
  #2  
redlude97
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 4,173
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1656 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 17 Posts
i've run up to 40c on A23s just fine, but its up to you do decide if there is excessive flop. You'll have to look to MTB rims to get something that wide with a braking surface in a 29er size which is going to be hard, maybe like the velocity cliffhanger
redlude97 is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 11:59 AM
  #3  
kokak
Just finidng my cadence
 
kokak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: SGV, California
Posts: 16

Bikes: Catrike 559, Trek Domane

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I am using Velocity Aileron rims with my Compass 44s. They have a 20mm internal and a 25mm external measurement. I have been very happy with them.
kokak is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 12:09 PM
  #4  
rumatt
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by redlude97 View Post
i've run up to 40c on A23s just fine, but its up to you do decide if there is excessive flop. You'll have to look to MTB rims to get something that wide with a braking surface in a 29er size which is going to be hard, maybe like the velocity cliffhanger
What pressures did you run? I found that even with 35's at reasonable pressures (avoiding too much drop or squish) the ride was more uncomfortable than with 32's.
rumatt is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 12:17 PM
  #5  
chas58
Senior Member
 
chas58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Michigan
Posts: 3,558

Bikes: too many of all kinds

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 704 Post(s)
Liked 34 Times in 28 Posts
ETRO chart:
chas58 is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 12:58 PM
  #6  
rumatt
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I've seen charts like that, but they haven't aligned with my experiences. Maybe I should try 35c or bigger again on my A23's and confirm whether there's actually a problem.

I've read that the more supple the casing is, the less the rim size matters. The theory being that the rim is held up more by tire pressure rather than the tire sidewall.
rumatt is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 12:59 PM
  #7  
redlude97
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 4,173
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1656 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 17 Posts
Originally Posted by rumatt View Post
What pressures did you run? I found that even with 35's at reasonable pressures (avoiding too much drop or squish) the ride was more uncomfortable than with 32's.
no more than 40psi. closer to 30psi on gravel. what pressures are you running? The biggest issue it seems is that your 35(T-serv) is a tank of a tire. Try something more supple like the panaracer gravel king or some of the compass offerings.
redlude97 is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 01:01 PM
  #8  
rumatt
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I emailed light bicycle and they recommended these 21mm inner diameter rims.
https://www.lightbicycle.com/700C-V-...ompatible.html

I'm not convinced I want to deal with rim brakes on a carbon wheel though.
rumatt is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 01:07 PM
  #9  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 8,296

Bikes: '87 Schwinn Prelude, Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara/Centurion Ironman, '18 Diamondback Syncr, '18 handmade steel roadbike

Mentioned: 76 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2962 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 144 Times in 102 Posts
Originally Posted by rumatt View Post
What pressures did you run? I found that even with 35's at reasonable pressures (avoiding too much drop or squish) the ride was more uncomfortable than with 32's.
Curious what you mean when you say uncomfortable. Do you mean the 35s dont absorb enough vibration from road imperfections? Do you mean you think the tires are going to slip off the rims on turns?

I run 40mm tube tires on Archetype rims that are 17.5 internal and 23mm external. Cant say I think about the tires at all from comfort or feel perspectives. They help me go where i want when i want without thought. I run higher psi than most people(about 55ish), but i am 235 so that is expected.

Much wider than 23mm gets into 29er rim territory, from what ive seen before. Thats fine and all, some just might be a bit heavier/overbuilt.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 01:09 PM
  #10  
rumatt
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by redlude97 View Post
The biggest issue it seems is that your 35(T-serv) is a tank of a tire. Try something more supple like the panaracer gravel king or some of the compass offerings.
Awesome, I'll give that a try first.

I'm a little scared of the compass after hearing about their complete lack of protection, but maybe they're worth a shot.
rumatt is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 01:16 PM
  #11  
rumatt
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Curious what you mean when you say uncomfortable. Do you mean the 35s dont absorb enough vibration from road imperfections?
I mean that at the same tire pressure, the 35 is harsher over bumps than the 32. It's the casing tension phenomenon
https://silca.cc/blogs/journal/11861...tiffer-harsher

So with larger tires, to get the same comfort level you simply lower the pressure. However if you lower the pressure too much, particularly on a narrow rim, the tire starts to feel weird. Mushy, floppy, and less precise.

I haven't done enough experimentation to be an expert, but I distinctly remember replacing my 35C panaracer with a 32 on the front wheel and being much happier with the balance of comfort and handling. I blamed the wheel width, but maybe I should have blamed the T-serve casing.
rumatt is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 01:23 PM
  #12  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 8,296

Bikes: '87 Schwinn Prelude, Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara/Centurion Ironman, '18 Diamondback Syncr, '18 handmade steel roadbike

Mentioned: 76 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2962 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 144 Times in 102 Posts
Originally Posted by rumatt View Post
I mean that at the same tire pressure, the 35 is harsher over bumps than the 32. It's the casing tension phenomenon
https://silca.cc/blogs/journal/11861...tiffer-harsher

So with larger tires, to get the same comfort level you simply lower the pressure. However if you lower the pressure too much, particularly on a narrow rim, the tire starts to feel weird. Mushy, floppy, and less precise.

I haven't done enough experimentation to be an expert, but I distinctly remember replacing my 35C panaracer with a 32 on the front wheel and being much happier with the balance of comfort and handling. I blamed the wheel width, but maybe I should have blamed the T-serve casing.
Gotcha.
Not sure what TPI the tserv has, but my tires are 120tpi Clement MSO in 40mm. Pretty supple casing for an intended purpose gravel tire.
Perhaps a wider more supple tire will be more comfortable. Pretty much every drop bar gravel bike I see has rims that are in the 22-25mm wide range and run 38-45mm tires. Seems like a common range that works well for varied riders, at least around me.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 01:29 PM
  #13  
rumatt
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Gotcha.
Not sure what TPI the tserv has, but my tires are 120tpi Clement MSO in 40mm. Pretty supple casing for an intended purpose gravel tire.
Cool, thanks I'll check it out. The T-serve is 66 TPI

Originally Posted by mstateglfr
Perhaps a wider more supple tire will be more comfortable.
The Compass marketing machine claims that the more supple the tire, the less you need to worry about rim size. Here's the quote from their web page

Originally Posted by compass faq
With supple Rene Herse tires, it doesn’t matter how wide the rim is, as long as it’s no wider than the tire (outside width). If the rim is too wide, the tire can blow off, because it doesn’t properly engage with the hook on the rim’s sidewall. Rene Herse tires up to 44 mm wide can be run on rims as narrow as 20 mm. For wider Rene Herse tires, we recommend a minimum rim width of 23 mm.

You may have heard that matched rim and tire widths make the tire sidewalls more vertical, so they bear more of the bike and rider’s weight. This works with stiff sidewalls and allows running a lower tire pressure, but also decreases shock absorption and comfort.

With supple tires, almost the entire weight is supported by the air pressure of the tires. Whether the sidewalls are vertical or bulge makes very little difference. The most extreme case is a tubular tire, which touches the rim only in a very narrow spot, yet offers great handling and comfort.
I'm just a little worried about riding them after hearing how thin they are.

Originally Posted by mstateglfr
Pretty much every drop bar gravel bike I see has rims that are in the 22-25mm wide range and run 38-45mm tires. Seems like a common range that works well for varied riders, at least around me.
Do you mean outer diameter 22-25? Or inner?
rumatt is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 01:56 PM
  #14  
HTupolev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Seattle
Posts: 2,744
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1187 Post(s)
Liked 27 Times in 19 Posts
Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Gotcha.
Not sure what TPI the tserv has, but my tires are 120tpi Clement MSO in 40mm. Pretty supple casing for an intended purpose gravel tire.
Perhaps a wider more supple tire will be more comfortable. Pretty much every drop bar gravel bike I see has rims that are in the 22-25mm wide range and run 38-45mm tires. Seems like a common range that works well for varied riders, at least around me.
I think the performance issue with T-Servs is the protection, not that the casing fabric is course.

One of my friends ran 35-ish T-Servs on his gravel bike for a while. The two of us could ride together just fine on our road bikes. But on our gravel bikes, me on my 53mm Compass tires, him on his T-Servs, on paved stretches he could hardly cling to my draft.

Originally Posted by rumatt View Post
I'm just a little worried about riding them after hearing how thin they are.
What kind of flat are you concerned about in particular?
HTupolev is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 02:45 PM
  #15  
rumatt
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by HTupolev View Post
What kind of flat are you concerned about in particular?
Junk in the road. Glass, metal bits, etc.

I just read this comment about the large Compas tires. He's talking about tubless, but in general this is what I want to avoid.
I have the Compass Barlow Pass (700x38) tires and once I set them up tubeless I hated them. Why you ask? Some of these things have already been mentioned a bit by other posters:
  • Super supple sidewalls - too much so actually. The tires once set up tubeless were very tall, BIG light bulb profile, and the thin sidewalls made them a bit "squirrelly." Lots of side to side when you jam on the pedals at higher speeds. (This is on 21mm internal width rims.)
Gravel Cycling Forum | Riding Gravel
rumatt is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 03:03 PM
  #16  
chas58
Senior Member
 
chas58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Michigan
Posts: 3,558

Bikes: too many of all kinds

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 704 Post(s)
Liked 34 Times in 28 Posts
Originally Posted by rumatt View Post
I've seen charts like that, but they haven't aligned with my experiences. Maybe I should try 35c or bigger again on my A23's and confirm whether there's actually a problem.

I've read that the more supple the casing is, the less the rim size matters. The theory being that the rim is held up more by tire pressure rather than the tire sidewall.
I've gone way way outside those specs. But when doing that I can't go too high on pressure or too low (or cause blow off - wheel failure or too much sidewall squirm respectively.

Rim size matters less with a stiff casing. At least a stiff casing won't sqirm as much at low pressure. I've pinched some nice high end tires, but those supple sidewalls just gave out if I pushed on them too hard laterally.

I have some 22mm ID rims (28 outer) that I put some 28mm tires on (measured 31mm). It gave what looked like a really nice aero profile, but I tended to ride a bit too much on the sidewall (off of the tread cap) on hard cornering - and there isn't much rubber at all on the sidewall at all. Bummer.


but to your original question, they (22mm id) work great with my 40mm tires. That is their sweet spot - although they work well with my 32 and 33mm tires, and with my 50mm tires.
chas58 is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 03:06 PM
  #17  
Marcus_Ti 
Frozen Solid.
 
Marcus_Ti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Posts: 4,670

Bikes: Roadie: Seven Axiom Race Ti w/Chorus 11s. CX/Adventure: Carver Gravel Grinder w/ Di2

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1923 Post(s)
Liked 56 Times in 36 Posts
Originally Posted by rumatt View Post
I emailed light bicycle and they recommended these 21mm inner diameter rims.
https://www.lightbicycle.com/700C-V-...ompatible.html

I'm not convinced I want to deal with rim brakes on a carbon wheel though.
I would not. And I'm a happy customer with a set of their RR46C02 rims laced to Onyx centerlock-disc hubs.

I would point you at rims like Easton R90SL, or HED Belgium+ or AForce AL33. They are as nice as alloy rims get, and will make great wheels. Most quality wheel builders have them and can do you up a set to your pick of quality hubs/spokes.

Last edited by Marcus_Ti; 03-14-19 at 03:10 PM.
Marcus_Ti is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 03:06 PM
  #18  
chas58
Senior Member
 
chas58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Michigan
Posts: 3,558

Bikes: too many of all kinds

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 704 Post(s)
Liked 34 Times in 28 Posts
Originally Posted by rumatt View Post
Junk in the road. Glass, metal bits, etc.

I just read this comment about the large Compas tires. He's talking about tubless, but in general this is what I want to avoid.

Gravel Cycling Forum | Riding Gravel
I think the problem with ultralight tires like that is that people run them at very low pressures and the cords in the sidewall tend to deteriorate. This gets pretty ugly if you use them tubless as they will also weap where the cords are damaged (and even sometimes when they are not damaged). Compass is pretty extreme a tire. Is that what you want?
chas58 is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 03:22 PM
  #19  
HTupolev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Seattle
Posts: 2,744
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1187 Post(s)
Liked 27 Times in 19 Posts
Originally Posted by rumatt View Post
Junk in the road. Glass, metal bits, etc.
Ah.

Yeah, I wouldn't say they're any worse at dealing with those things than any other performance-oriented road tire (the protection layers on most racing tires have a bigger role as decorations for the marketing material than anything else), but Rene Herse tires certainly aren't immune to urban debris.

I just read this comment about the large Compass tires. He's talking about tubless, but in general this is what I want to avoid.

Gravel Cycling Forum | Riding Gravel
I haven't set mine up tubeless yet because I've gotten very few punctures and have never flatted them off-pavement, although I have used 2" Vittoria latex tubes in the Rat Traps a fair amount.

The suppleness does make the tires fairly pressure-sensitive, and when they're underinflated, they can exhibit some funky behaviors.... down at 15PSI, the front 53 makes the bike handle a bit like a boat, which is downright scary. But they need to be pumped considerably higher than most other similar-sized tires in order to have similar firmness, and I would never intentionally run them that low. On 200lb bike+rider, on gravel I usually have the front at somewhere around 25PSI. I haven't noticed bad behaviors putting the power down.
HTupolev is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 03:24 PM
  #20  
rumatt
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks for the wheel suggestions. The Hed Belgium plus is the widest internal at 20.5. The others are 19.5. That's wider but still awfully close to the 18 I already have.

I'm not wedded to the compass. But I do ride on some bad quality roads and trails and I like the idea of a bigger tire that is comfortable and can soak up the road imperfections.
rumatt is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 05:34 PM
  #21  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 8,296

Bikes: '87 Schwinn Prelude, Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara/Centurion Ironman, '18 Diamondback Syncr, '18 handmade steel roadbike

Mentioned: 76 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2962 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 144 Times in 102 Posts
Originally Posted by rumatt View Post
Do you mean outer diameter 22-25? Or inner?
Outer. 17-19 inner and 22-25 outer. Those with a 40mm tire are incredibly common around me.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 06:51 PM
  #22  
rumatt
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
OK I found another story similar to mine regarding big tires at low pressures

From the comments in this article: https://www.gravelbike.com/first-imp...de-pass-tires/
John, my experience (see my first comment above, June 9 2015) is that the cornering can get squirrelly with pressure below 55 psi rear and 45 psi front. This is with Barlow Pass 70038 tires mounted on Velocity Synergy rims with 19mm internal width, me at 190 lbs and the bike at 24 lbs. I did some hard sharp turns at low speed to watch what happens – the sidewalls partially collapse and wrinkle up when you feel the tire wash out. At high speed it would be dangerous. By increasing the pressure from 50/40 psi or a bit less (my preference for ride quality) to 55/45 psi, the tire becomes rigid enough under cornering loads to prevent washing out. Obviously, the pressures needed will vary depending on rider+bike+cargo load and cornering style. I needed to carefully sneak up on the best compromise.

I just changed out my wheels to some really wide ones I’ve built: H+Son Todestrieb (really a 29er mountain bike rim) laced to road hubs. These are about 25mm internal width and 32mm external width. The wider rim pretty much eliminates the “light bulb” cross section of these wide tires. The cross section is now similar to a 25mm tire mounted on a standard road rim, just scaled up. The wider rim definitely improves stability in turns. I’ve done a couple rides this week (one in pouring rain), with the pressure dropped to my preferred 50 psi rear/40 psi front, and it is just as stable as it was at 55/45 psi mounted on the narrower rims. The down side of course is that the wider rims weigh quite a bit more – the Todestriebs are listed at 600g each online, but this is optimistic for even the 26″ (559mm) size. My 29″ (700c / 622mm) rims actually weighed in at 740g each, so these are comparable to other large heavy duty rims. Yet the bike rides so nice with the wider rims, I don’t think I mind the heavier wheels.

However, there aren't many 23mm inner diameter rims with rim brakes. I found two carbon light bicycle rims (inner diameters 21 and 23) and there's the boat anchor Velocity Cliffhanger mountain bike rim.
rumatt is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 07:13 PM
  #23  
redlude97
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 4,173
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1656 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 17 Posts
Originally Posted by rumatt View Post
OK I found another story similar to mine regarding big tires at low pressures

From the comments in this article: https://www.gravelbike.com/first-imp...de-pass-tires/



However, there aren't many 23mm inner diameter rims with rim brakes. I found two carbon light bicycle rims (inner diameters 21 and 23) and there's the boat anchor Velocity Cliffhanger mountain bike rim.
Sidewall flex isn't inherently bad and doesn't mean it will instantly wash out. Plenty of us cyclocross racers are running 33s at ~20psi, now that is sidewall flex. I'll regular bottom out the rim during prerides and basically air down until i start hitting the rim and then add a few psi. There is also a huge range of tires between the compass and the tserv that will provide a supple ride with some protection, for example the panaracer gravelking(non sk) I mentioned earlier has a beefier sidewall and protection belt under the tread
redlude97 is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 07:24 PM
  #24  
rm -rf
don't try this at home.
 
rm -rf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: N. KY
Posts: 5,084
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 622 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 13 Posts
I didn't have any cornering problems with Compass 38mm extralights on my 20.5mm internal width HED rims. (I don't do "extreme" cornering moves on that gravel bike!)
At 170 pounds, I used 35 psi front, and 42 psi rear on rough chipseal and on crushed stone rail trails. It was very smooth, and was still fast and efficient on good road surfaces. I could probably go 5 psi lower on really bad surfaces.
rm -rf is offline  
Old 03-14-19, 07:27 PM
  #25  
rumatt
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by redlude97 View Post
Sidewall flex isn't inherently bad and doesn't mean it will instantly wash out. Plenty of us cyclocross racers are running 33s at ~20psi, now that is sidewall flex. I'll regular bottom out the rim during prerides and basically air down until i start hitting the rim and then add a few psi.
Yeah I've done the same on my mountain bike rides. "Ooops I'm bottoming out, better add a few PSI". I assume the rim width plays a roll in the handling at that point, but I don't know how much.

There is also a huge range of tires between the compass and the tserv that will provide a supple ride with some protection, for example the panaracer gravelking(non sk) I mentioned earlier has a beefier sidewall and protection belt under the tread
Yeah thanks for the suggestion. I've got a gravelking at the top of my list to try. It looks pretty sweet. Maybe I'll try the 38's on my A23's and report back. I noticed the 38's are tubless ready, which I didn't need. Seems a shame to stick a tube in anyway.
rumatt is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.