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Continental Cyclocross Race tubeless?

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Continental Cyclocross Race tubeless?

Old 02-11-20, 06:00 PM
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BoozyMcliverRot
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Continental Cyclocross Race tubeless?

I have some wire bead 700x35 Conti Cyclocross Race tires I'm considering running tubeless. They will be going on Specialized Stout disc wheelset that is tubeless compatible. Can this be done safely and what's the highest psi I could run them at without worrying about them blowing off the bead?

The bike will be used as a mixed terrain ride ala flat bar gravel bike.

Thank you in advance.

Edit: I'm 160lbs

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Old 02-12-20, 11:29 AM
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No, you can't do it safely. It voids all warranty, will send you to the hospital, and cause the earth to start spinning backwards.

That didn't stop me from doing it though. I used 32mm conti's. My rims are hook-less (a double bad for Conti) so there is a nice very tight fit when the tires pop onto the rim bed. Obviously you don't want to do this if it is a lose fit. I use "skinny stripper" latex strips as an extra measure of safety as it ensures a good burp-proof interface (and actually makes tubeless into a pseudo tubular tire).

My wheels are rated to 70psi. Personally, I wouldn't put more than 60psi in any tubeless tire. 40psi should be plenty for you on gravel; 50 maybe 55 on paved for your 35mm tires.

But ya know, if you have a front tire blow out at speed, it will put you in the hospital...
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Old 02-12-20, 02:16 PM
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Originally Posted by chas58 View Post
No, you can't do it safely. It voids all warranty, will send you to the hospital, and cause the earth to start spinning backwards.

That didn't stop me from doing it though. I used 32mm conti's. My rims are hook-less (a double bad for Conti) so there is a nice very tight fit when the tires pop onto the rim bed. Obviously you don't want to do this if it is a lose fit. I use "skinny stripper" latex strips as an extra measure of safety as it ensures a good burp-proof interface (and actually makes tubeless into a pseudo tubular tire).

My wheels are rated to 70psi. Personally, I wouldn't put more than 60psi in any tubeless tire. 40psi should be plenty for you on gravel; 50 maybe 55 on paved for your 35mm tires.

But ya know, if you have a front tire blow out at speed, it will put you in the hospital...
Yeah,I know ghetto tubeless is a big thing for mtb but they are high volume low pressure. Ghetto tubeless for road is almost impossible because high pressure low volume. I figured that the 35c is close enough to halfway between road and mtb that it might workout so I wanted to see what others may have done with a similar setup.

Thanks for the info I appreciate it. I guess I'll just bite the bullet and get some tubeless compatible tires.
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Old 02-12-20, 02:37 PM
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that is your best bet.
A tubeless tire is going to have a tighter bead, so it is less likely to stretch and blow off. They tend to have a little different bead shape too. Sometimes (definitely not always) they are somewhat air/water tight so that you don't get any seepage of sealant when it sets up (most of the light weight models do have a lot of initial seepage).
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