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Checkpoint “pulling” into turns

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Checkpoint “pulling” into turns

Old 03-03-21, 03:09 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by seinberg
Trek in my area (NYC region) stopped doing real fittings during COVID. Plus, frankly, the guys selling the bike didn't *really* seem to know what they were doing - it was a brand new shop. I rode the bike a couple miles and it seemed more or less okay, figured I could tweak things. But after having some time with the bike I got more "in tune" with the bike and realized the fit wasn't quite right. That said, there are a ton of places where I can get a true fitting - I just want to wait until it's safer.

Great info on the angles. Now that I'm looking at my road bike, that's precisely what the shop I bought that from (pre-covid) did and it fits me perfectly. I'll give that a whirl. Is there anything special I need to do to flip it, or do I just loosen a bunch of nuts and flip and re-tighten? I guess I could also bring it to a Trek shop if it's any more complicated than that or I need special tools beyond allen/torx/torque wrench
Its a couple of metric hex keys. One for the stem cap and one for the stem bolts.

Undo the 4(i assume) bolts on the handlebars and lay the bars on the wheel or something so the cables dont get all twisted.
Undo the stem cap bolt and remove the cap.
Undo the stem clamp bolts then pull the stem up.
Flip it.
Replace the stem cap bolt and tighten it to a point where there is no slop/play, but where the front wheel turns freely.
Then tighten the stem clamp bolts.
Put the handlebars back and tighten the 4 bolts. Do the bolts in an alternating cross pattern and make sure there is the same amount of space between the stem plate and stem up top as below. Basically, dont just tighten the bottom ones then the top ones because the stem plate wont have force evenly distributed. Tighten in an alternating pattern. This is especially important since the bar is carbon and even distribution of force is a lot better than uneven.

That is a lot of steps, but it isnt much once youve done it. Properly preloading the headset with the stem cap bolt is the only thing that is kinda confusing since you dont know if its good if youve never done it before. The easy way to find out is once the bike is back together, hold the brakes engaged and rock the bike back and forth on its wheels. If the headset is too loose, you will immediately feel it and just loosen the stem clamp bolts then tighten the stem cap a bit more before tightening the clamp bolts again. If its good and there is no play in the headset, then twist the bars left and right. If they are tough to twist then you overtightened the stem cap. Loosen the stem clamp bolts, slightly loosen the stem cap, then tighten the clamp bolts and twist the bars to compare.


...or take it to a shop.
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Old 03-04-21, 10:52 AM
  #27  
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When you're ready for new tires, give something like the Panaracer Gravelkings, or Rene Herse Barlow Pass in 700X38 a shot. I really like the GR1 Team Issues that come on the Checkpoint SL series, and never felt them pulling into a corner unless there was way too low of pressure in them (I also run them on my FX in the spring and summer when I don't need fenders). I run 40 PSI in 700X38 and it feels perfect.

The brake shuddering is likely due to the brakes not getting bedded in thoroughly. I've had the same issue on my Checkpoint and my Crockett. SRAM brake systems seem to be more particular than Shimano in this regard. I've had luck using Squeal Out to get them bedded in a bit better. If all else fails, get a set of Shimano rotors. They're slightly thinner, too, so by proxy you'll get rid of that slight rub when you're mashing on the pedals and rocking the bike side to side. Still, give that headset adjustment a check, and make sure the caliper is torqued down for good measure.
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Old 03-08-21, 09:04 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr
Its a couple of metric hex keys. One for the stem cap and one for the stem bolts.

Undo the 4(i assume) bolts on the handlebars and lay the bars on the wheel or something so the cables dont get all twisted.
Undo the stem cap bolt and remove the cap.
Undo the stem clamp bolts then pull the stem up.
Flip it.
Replace the stem cap bolt and tighten it to a point where there is no slop/play, but where the front wheel turns freely.
Then tighten the stem clamp bolts.
Put the handlebars back and tighten the 4 bolts. Do the bolts in an alternating cross pattern and make sure there is the same amount of space between the stem plate and stem up top as below. Basically, dont just tighten the bottom ones then the top ones because the stem plate wont have force evenly distributed. Tighten in an alternating pattern. This is especially important since the bar is carbon and even distribution of force is a lot better than uneven.

That is a lot of steps, but it isnt much once youve done it. Properly preloading the headset with the stem cap bolt is the only thing that is kinda confusing since you dont know if its good if youve never done it before. The easy way to find out is once the bike is back together, hold the brakes engaged and rock the bike back and forth on its wheels. If the headset is too loose, you will immediately feel it and just loosen the stem clamp bolts then tighten the stem cap a bit more before tightening the clamp bolts again. If its good and there is no play in the headset, then twist the bars left and right. If they are tough to twist then you overtightened the stem cap. Loosen the stem clamp bolts, slightly loosen the stem cap, then tighten the clamp bolts and twist the bars to compare.


...or take it to a shop.
Had a bit of an adventure flipping the stem last night. Everything's super straight-forward, got everything setup, but when I was torqueing the stem I read the wrong torque spec. I saw 9-10nm labeled under the stem (meant for the headset) thinking it was meant for the stem, not really processing that 9-10nm is actually quite a bit of torque. Snapped the head off one of the bolts This morning I found a 70mm stem with a 17 degree rise and it's much better on the reach. While I was at it also swapped out the Bontrager saddle that my butt doesn't agree with and put the same saddle my Roubaix has (Spesh Power saddle).
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Old 03-12-21, 03:24 PM
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Take it to the dealer.
Fork shudder, likely the TA is not tightened. You can give it a good solid wrist twist, it's hard to over tighten using your hands.
The stem - tighten the top cap THEN the two side bolts.

Check the moveable rear dropouts. They might not be set right. You should see the paint scratched up if it has been moving around. The wheel might not be aligned straight.
Check the end caps on the wheels. They should be 12mm and not 15mm.The TA should not have play when you stick in in without out the fork.
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Old 03-15-21, 03:01 PM
  #30  
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Hey seinberg , I solved the brake shudder on my Checkpoint. Everything worked fine when I had GRX on the bike, so I knew it wasn't something with the thru-axles, stem bolts, caliper bolts, alignment, etc. I was talking with one of my mechanics, and he mentioned an outside the box solution he did a couple years ago where he tried using an organic and a metallic pad in each caliper. We gave it a shot with the SRAM system and put a sintered pad in with the original organic pad since the wear was pretty minimal. I've put 50 miles on the bike and have had zero issues so far. Give that a shot.
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Old 03-16-21, 11:19 AM
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Originally Posted by mister
Hey seinberg , I solved the brake shudder on my Checkpoint. Everything worked fine when I had GRX on the bike, so I knew it wasn't something with the thru-axles, stem bolts, caliper bolts, alignment, etc. I was talking with one of my mechanics, and he mentioned an outside the box solution he did a couple years ago where he tried using an organic and a metallic pad in each caliper. We gave it a shot with the SRAM system and put a sintered pad in with the original organic pad since the wear was pretty minimal. I've put 50 miles on the bike and have had zero issues so far. Give that a shot.
Thanks for those details! Very helpful -- the bike mechanic I use most had suggested something similar, so I think you're very likely right. Interestingly, on my end, the issue with shuddering has pretty much gone away just by riding a bit more. I've probably put around 200 mi on the bike in the past two weeks and thinking back, I don't think I've noticed it at all. Certainly not to the degree it was when I first got the bike, when the whole front end would shudder heavily.
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