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All-City Cosmic Stallion v. Ribble CGR

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All-City Cosmic Stallion v. Ribble CGR

Old 08-31-21, 08:58 AM
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All-City Cosmic Stallion v. Ribble CGR

Hey guys,

Iíve narrowed my bike choices down to either the All-City Cosmic Stallion (GRX) or the Ribble CGR in steel, links below. Anyone have experience with either of these bikes? I like the aesthetics of the All-City more, but I wonder if the CGR is really the better bike as far as performance goes, and it can be had in custom color configurations if you arenít into the default orange and blue vibe.

Iíd be interested in your thoughts on these bikes in particular, but also the companies. I really donít know that much about either.

Thank you!

https://allcitycycles.com/bikes/cosmic_stallion_grx

https://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/ribble-cgr-725/
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Old 08-31-21, 10:38 AM
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I love All City, but their stuff doesn't really fit me. Its a bummer, frankly. If both bikes fit me equally I'd go ACCS
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Old 08-31-21, 10:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Wspsux
I love All City, but their stuff doesn't really fit me. Its a bummer, frankly. If both bikes fit me equally I'd go ACCS
Why donít they fit? I thought most bikes could be fit to most people by adjusting the seatpost, saddle, stem, etc.
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Old 08-31-21, 11:01 AM
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They both have the same amount of trail, though they get to that end result differently since head tube angle and fork rake is different.
The AC has 4mm more bottom bracket drop.
The AC has 5mm longer chainstay.
The AC has more stack height for the same amount of reach(looking at the largest 4 sizes of each frame).
The AC's fork is cool because it has a flip chip to change rake. It can be 53mm or 47mm, depending on which setting you use. If you dont geek on geometry then this means very little to you.

Do these differences mean much to you? If so, take em into account. If its meaningless/unimportant, the dont.
Me personally, I geek on geometry and its the 1 thing on a bike that cant be changed out so its more important to me than which tires or seatpost is used. The biggest difference between the two is very much stack height vs reach. The Ribble is longer and lower than the AC.

As for frame quality- total toss up. The Ribble uses good quality tubing and will 100% for sure be overbuilt in order to pass fatigue testing in Europe. Same with the AC- it will not be slight in weight and the tubing they use is good, even if its branded as their own. Tire clearance is basically the same- 45mm for Ribble and 47mm for AC.

AC uses a 2x GRX build with a 46/30 crank and an 11-32 cassette and costs $2800
Ribble uses a 1x GRX build. You can get an Ultegra build though, but then its road gearing(though you can also get a 'climbers' gearing package) and costs $2640 in Ultegra Climber's option. You could spend the difference and buy a GRX crank and FD to get the same gearing as the AC.


If geometry isnt a big difference, then components sure are! Do you want 1x or 2x? That alone may push you one way or the other. If you want 2x, you can get road 2x for the Ribble and change stuff...do you want to do that? The Ribble in Ultegra Climbers option comes with a carbon stem, bars, and seatpost and you can choose from a bunch of tires.
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Old 08-31-21, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by ImTheDecider
Why don’t they fit? I thought most bikes could be fit to most people by adjusting the seatpost, saddle, stem, etc.
I am 6'5 and neither bike has geometry that I ride. The AC is admittedly very close and I could make it work with a goofy angled up stem, but that isnt something I want to do.
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Old 08-31-21, 11:59 AM
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr
They both have the same amount of trail, though they get to that end result differently since head tube angle and fork rake is different.
The AC has 4mm more bottom bracket drop.
The AC has 5mm longer chainstay.
The AC has more stack height for the same amount of reach(looking at the largest 4 sizes of each frame).
The AC's fork is cool because it has a flip chip to change rake. It can be 53mm or 47mm, depending on which setting you use. If you dont geek on geometry then this means very little to you.

Do these differences mean much to you? If so, take em into account. If its meaningless/unimportant, the dont.
Me personally, I geek on geometry and its the 1 thing on a bike that cant be changed out so its more important to me than which tires or seatpost is used. The biggest difference between the two is very much stack height vs reach. The Ribble is longer and lower than the AC.

As for frame quality- total toss up. The Ribble uses good quality tubing and will 100% for sure be overbuilt in order to pass fatigue testing in Europe. Same with the AC- it will not be slight in weight and the tubing they use is good, even if its branded as their own. Tire clearance is basically the same- 45mm for Ribble and 47mm for AC.

AC uses a 2x GRX build with a 46/30 crank and an 11-32 cassette and costs $2800
Ribble uses a 1x GRX build. You can get an Ultegra build though, but then its road gearing(though you can also get a 'climbers' gearing package) and costs $2640 in Ultegra Climber's option. You could spend the difference and buy a GRX crank and FD to get the same gearing as the AC.


If geometry isnt a big difference, then components sure are! Do you want 1x or 2x? That alone may push you one way or the other. If you want 2x, you can get road 2x for the Ribble and change stuff...do you want to do that? The Ribble in Ultegra Climbers option comes with a carbon stem, bars, and seatpost and you can choose from a bunch of tires.
Very interesting! If the AC has higher stack height for the same reach, does that mean it sits you more upright?

I think I’d prefer the 2x of the AC, which I’ve been thinking about. That’s the only big difference I could pick up on given my lack of understanding of frame geo.

EDIT: I forgot to ask, I can’t find much about EU bike standards vs American online. Are they safer in some way because of the standards?

Last edited by ImTheDecider; 08-31-21 at 12:11 PM.
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Old 08-31-21, 12:53 PM
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Originally Posted by ImTheDecider
Very interesting! If the AC has higher stack height for the same reach, does that mean it sits you more upright?

I think Iíd prefer the 2x of the AC, which Iíve been thinking about. Thatís the only big difference I could pick up on given my lack of understanding of frame geo.

EDIT: I forgot to ask, I canít find much about EU bike standards vs American online. Are they safer in some way because of the standards?
- Simple answer is yes, a higher stack height with the same reach will result in a more upright position.
- The Ribble can certainly come as 2x, it would just be with a road climbing drivetrain and gearing. That can be switched out and you can sell the new takeoff components to offset costs. Another big difference is cost- the Ribble with an Ultegra drivetrain, a carbon cockpit, and upgraded wheels is cheaper than the AC.
- I dont think EU standards are safer. Any brand that wants to sell there has to pass some fatigue testing(not sure of details) and as a result, pretty much all quality steel frames that are batch manufactured are overbuilt. This isnt necessarily bad, its just how it is. My Fairlight Secan gravel frame has an 853 main triangle and is crazy overbuilt for anything I would ever do on it. So with batch manufactured gravel frames using quality steel, you arent getting lightweight as much as you are getting strength/dent resistance. The tubing specs that all these brands use are not aggressively butted and thin because the frames need to withstand some fatigue testing that well exceeds anything close to normal riding. If my frame had been handbuilt by a small builder, it would probably weigh a few hundred grams less. Not a complaint, just an observation of differences. The All City Cosmic Stallion is for sure also tested in the same way- they have mentioned testing on their website before when they introduced their ACE tubing.
- You asked about companies earlier- All City is a really cool company that is a brand of a large US bike parts distributor(QBP). It is a sister company to Salsa, Surly, and more. Their paint schemes are consistently awesome year after year and they arent a brand I ever consider to be a price leader, but instead they come up with some really solid offerings using steel frames. Ribble is a long established retailer who used to slap their name on some frames to sell as their inhouse brand and now they have what seems like a legit design group(see Ribble's recent aero road bike release). They put out quality bikes (GCN had a video showcasing all of Ribble's CGR options) at really good prices and I think the bike customization they offer is a super appealing option.
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Old 08-31-21, 02:44 PM
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Originally Posted by ImTheDecider
Why donít they fit? I thought most bikes could be fit to most people by adjusting the seatpost, saddle, stem, etc.
this is true in the sense that if for example the ACCS were the only bike available I could make it fit me well enough to ride it. But it would be marginalized. Personally Iíd either have to go with the 52 with a 120mm stem and a bunch of spacers or ride the 55 with mere centimeters of seat post and no stand over clearance. I am forsaken with bizarrely short legs for my stack and reach requirements. Some people say stand over isnít a pertinent measure in fitment. I say those people arenít pertinent to fitment
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