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Do you want suspension - Grizl offers it

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Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational) This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like : "Unbound Gravel". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.
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Do you want suspension - Grizl offers it

Old 10-22-21, 08:27 AM
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Do you want suspension - Grizl offers it

Do you want a suspension on your gravel bike? There is a lot of talk here about compliant handlebars, compliant stems, etc. Maybe suspension is the way to go?
I'm just remembering tuesday's gravel race/training ride where the guy next to me just beat up his wrists (granted, he was on 33mm CX tires which IMHO were not appropriate for gravel).

Canyon thinks you might: https://www.canyon.com/en-us/gravel-...sion/2710.html

What do you think Yeah/Nah?
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Old 10-22-21, 09:02 AM
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Nah, just get a 90’s mountain bike with a RockShox.
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Old 10-22-21, 09:46 AM
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30mm of travel on a fork that weighs 1215g?
I dont want suspension, but if I did, I would try for a Redshift stem and concede 100g first. If that didnt work, and larger tires didnt work, and more bar tape didnt work, then maybe I would look into a 30mm suspension fork that adds 700g(1.5pounds). My gravel bike weighs 24.5# ready to ride though, so I am already on the high end of things and perhaps am more hesitant to not pile on more weight.
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Old 10-22-21, 09:51 AM
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Mountain bikes diverged into multiple categories (XC, trail, enduro, DH) and it looks like the same thing is happening to gravel bikes.
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Old 10-22-21, 09:05 PM
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I don’t even use a suspension fork on my mountain bike; I’m certainly not going to bother with it for gravel.
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Old 10-22-21, 09:15 PM
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I've actually begun to think that some form of minimalist suspension will become the norm on most (non-racing intended) gravel bikes in the next few years. For the average person there really isn't that much downside. I just really hope that they make it more clever than done weight weenied short travel telescopic forks.

Personally, I believe lauf has the right idea with their suspension fork. It weighs several hundred grams less than other gravel suspension forks, it has no moving parts and therefore need no maintenance, it has really low unsprung weight, and is tuned well enough that or really doesn't need a damper which gives it amazing response in chattery gravel. The only things I don't like about them is you can't choose your own spring rate - it's baked in, and they won't make them with three pack mounts.

I've personally hit some stuff on a "very compliant" gravel frame with 2.2" tires that still makes my hands sting.
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Old 10-23-21, 04:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Rolla
I donít even use a suspension fork on my mountain bike; Iím certainly not going to bother with it for gravel.
Me too, I very much prefer a rigid fork on my MTBs and for gravel riding.
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Old 10-23-21, 09:53 AM
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I was out riding gravel last week and got passed by someone on an old mtb with a short travel fork. Reminded me of these suspended gravel bikes.

Seems like there have been drop bar mountain bikes for a long time, but they usually come with a rigid suspension corrected fork that nobody ever replaces. And if they did, it would have more travel than this.
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Old 10-23-21, 07:01 PM
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I did a gravel ride today that included some very fast descents on pretty rough gravel. I would have really liked a little bit of suspension. I agree with Freetor - the Lauf approach seems quite interesting.

I was having a conversation with my riding partner about it. I think there is a lot of room in the gravel bike genre. We've done a few races / events where we could get by with pretty narrow tires, and then we have done a few that just beat the hell out of you where we both would have loved a little suspension. I'm also fine with those who don't want it. More choice is good - I'll only get really worried if the UCI starts imposing restrictions that limit gravel bike innovation / differences.
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Old 10-23-21, 07:21 PM
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I include all generations under "suspension forks", from Schwinn classic springers to the modern zertz inserts. It just depends on what and how you ride.
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Old 10-24-21, 09:11 AM
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I want my gravel(and CX) bikes to ride mostly like road bikes, but with wider tires appropriate for gravel. Sure, I like the additional flex and "compliance" that a carbon bar (and frameset) offers - but this applies to road bikes as well. To me, the main selling point of gravel bikes is that they're good for longer paved road rides AND good for gravel roads and tamer single tracks.

Suspension is going way too far into the off-road end of the spectrum for me - and in those situations I have very little use for drop bars. I'd much rather run 40mm tires on a flat bar XC MTB, than run a suspension fork on a drop bar bike. I'm also not doing mega long endurance gravel races.

If suspension didn't add any weight and could easily be locked out or adjusted on the fly to different riding conditions (i.e. electronically controlled/magnetic dampers) - I might feel differently. I definitely don't want a traditional fork suspension on my gravel bike though.
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Old 10-24-21, 09:26 AM
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The thing I want most is bigger tires, because we have a lot of fairly rough downhills. There is one road that it a bit too rough to pleasantly ride my gravel bike downhill on, I have thought about riding my mtb on it to see what the difference is. Still unlikely to get a suspension fork though. Sometimes I think about getting a Redshift stem
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Old 10-24-21, 11:15 AM
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I have the redshift stem (as well as their seatpost -- got both as a Kickstarter bundle, but the stem arrived well ahead of the seatpost,
fortunately).

The stem is pretty much ideal. The only negative is a small weight penalty. I currently have it, and the seatpost, on my touring bike, but I have tried the stem on several bikes, and it always has left a positive impression. It comes with several elastomer inserts that are color-coded according to how stiff you want the spring action. I prefer mine on the stiff end, but my wife, who has arthritis issues in her wrists, prefers the more forgiving options. It has really helped her. Unfortunately, it isn't compatible with her current setup, so we are looking for alternatives.

I've also compared it head to head with a Lauf fork, and prefer the Redshift stem.

It isn't a replacement for mountain bike shocks, but with wide tires at low pressure, it is remarkable what you can do without mountain bike shocks (even on a mountain bike).

In case it isn't obvious, it doesn't have dampening, but I've never had any weird sensations of elastic rebound.
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Old 10-24-21, 12:12 PM
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Originally Posted by ericcox
I did a gravel ride today that included some very fast descents on pretty rough gravel. I would have really liked a little bit of suspension. I agree with Freetor - the Lauf approach seems quite interesting.

I was having a conversation with my riding partner about it. I think there is a lot of room in the gravel bike genre. We've done a few races / events where we could get by with pretty narrow tires, and then we have done a few that just beat the hell out of you where we both would have loved a little suspension. I'm also fine with those who don't want it. More choice is good - I'll only get really worried if the UCI starts imposing restrictions that limit gravel bike innovation / differences.
My Surley Straggler is fine for most of the gravel I biked in the DFW area but found I could use some extra suspension for the trails that are really more for mtn bikes, like Northshore Grapevine. I was ok with Gateway Park FW. Where were you riding ?
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Old 10-24-21, 01:37 PM
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Originally Posted by joesch
My Surley Straggler is fine for most of the gravel I biked in the DFW area but found I could use some extra suspension for the trails that are really more for mtn bikes, like Northshore Grapevine. I was ok with Gateway Park FW. Where were you riding ?
We ride here and there. I am on a cross bike - I have a 38 on the front, but the rear clearance is quite limited; I have a 33 on it. The west side at gateway is definitely manageable - I did the Martin House time trials out there. While I wasn't too fast on the trails, I was top 10 on the trinity trail portion; drop bar bikes have their advantage. A friend of mine who mountain bikes a fair bit took me over to gateway east on our cross bikes. That was a little more difficult.

Most of the gravel around here is fine. I've done a few spinistry events up in the Sanger area, and find that gravel to be very fast and easy to navigate. The worst we've ridden was the hell of the north ride in Paris, TX. Some of those roads were pretty rough. We were in Meridian yesterday for a 100km loosely organized event. Lots of hills, including some steep sections. The downhills were manageable, but a little suspension would have been nice. I have access to some trails west of here that are pretty rough / technical in parts.

As I've discussed with my wife, I can do these roads / events / races on my cross bike, but it would be better on a dedicated gravel rig :-). The cross bike, FWIW, is fantastic in cross races.
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Old 10-24-21, 03:04 PM
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I don't have to want it. I think there's a market for it. I definitely think there's a dead zone in the market between 30-40-something-mm tires with no suspension, and 55+ mm tires with 100 mm suspension, which is the absolute minimum on a racing XC bike.

This Rudy fork is a legit and up to date effort from RS, not just a shortened MTB fork. I'm sure it is going to have first year learning curve and no idea if it will return their investment or die, but it's at least sincere and not just a cash in gravel decal on a MTB product. (You can tell comparing its innards to the "hybrid" Paragon fork, which is definitely a short travel cheap version of an average fork from twenty years ago.) Especially on the air spring side where the volume spacers are pretty dramatic. It's going to be plush to start and ramp up a lot. That says they've been running their shock wiz software on it with a goal in mind. They gave it new forgings with a sleek new design for the flat mount and thru axle that I hope makes it back in some form to the MTB side where post mount is getting long in the tooth.
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Old 10-24-21, 03:57 PM
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Originally Posted by ericcox
We ride here and there. I am on a cross bike - I have a 38 on the front, but the rear clearance is quite limited; I have a 33 on it. The west side at gateway is definitely manageable - I did the Martin House time trials out there. While I wasn't too fast on the trails, I was top 10 on the trinity trail portion; drop bar bikes have their advantage. A friend of mine who mountain bikes a fair bit took me over to gateway east on our cross bikes. That was a little more difficult.

Most of the gravel around here is fine. I've done a few spinistry events up in the Sanger area, and find that gravel to be very fast and easy to navigate. The worst we've ridden was the hell of the north ride in Paris, TX. Some of those roads were pretty rough. We were in Meridian yesterday for a 100km loosely organized event. Lots of hills, including some steep sections. The downhills were manageable, but a little suspension would have been nice. I have access to some trails west of here that are pretty rough / technical in parts.

As I've discussed with my wife, I can do these roads / events / races on my cross bike, but it would be better on a dedicated gravel rig :-). The cross bike, FWIW, is fantastic in cross races.
Nice ... Martin House is one of my fav after ride stops in FW
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Old 10-24-21, 04:28 PM
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The gravel race courses will drive the suspension requirements. If the courses are rougher/bumpier, riders with greater suspension will have an advantage, and suspension will become more popular.

Gravel suspension manufacturers should bribe the race course deciders to select bumpier courses.
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Old 10-24-21, 06:45 PM
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Originally Posted by wgscott
I have the redshift stem (as well as their seatpost -- got both as a Kickstarter bundle, but the stem arrived well ahead of the seatpost,
fortunately).

The stem is pretty much ideal. The only negative is a small weight penalty. I currently have it, and the seatpost, on my touring bike, but I have tried the stem on several bikes, and it always has left a positive impression. It comes with several elastomer inserts that are color-coded according to how stiff you want the spring action. I prefer mine on the stiff end, but my wife, who has arthritis issues in her wrists, prefers the more forgiving options. It has really helped her. Unfortunately, it isn't compatible with her current setup, so we are looking for alternatives.

I've also compared it head to head with a Lauf fork, and prefer the Redshift stem.

It isn't a replacement for mountain bike shocks, but with wide tires at low pressure, it is remarkable what you can do without mountain bike shocks (even on a mountain bike).

In case it isn't obvious, it doesn't have dampening, but I've never had any weird sensations of elastic rebound.
I put on a Lauf 30 MM gravel fork 3 years ago to try as a demo and never gave it up. It is fantastic, especially for control on fast descents. No bob, no dive and no stiction. No maintenance either. Personally I believe if most folks try it they also will not want to give it up. The Lauf fork provides true suspension close to the axle compared to the redshift stem which adds "suspension" after the fork puts half of the bumps straight into the frame through the headset. Than makes little sense to me if you really want to dampen vibration; why go half way? For me, the Lauf adds tremendous control enhancement on downhills, while it immediately eliminated hand numbness. Unfortunately it is rather pricey as a big downside, but it is the sort of thing that you can move from bike to bike to leverage the investment.
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Old 10-25-21, 08:35 AM
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Originally Posted by dwmckee
I put on a Lauf 30 MM gravel fork 3 years ago to try as a demo and never gave it up. It is fantastic, especially for control on fast descents. No bob, no dive and no stiction. No maintenance either. Personally I believe if most folks try it they also will not want to give it up. The Lauf fork provides true suspension close to the axle compared to the redshift stem which adds "suspension" after the fork puts half of the bumps straight into the frame through the headset. Than makes little sense to me if you really want to dampen vibration; why go half way? For me, the Lauf adds tremendous control enhancement on downhills, while it immediately eliminated hand numbness. Unfortunately it is rather pricey as a big downside, but it is the sort of thing that you can move from bike to bike to leverage the investment.
Are Lauf Forks good?

The Verdict. The Lauf Grit improves control and reduces fatigue on the bumpy surfaces of gravel, dirt and broken pavement at a weight cost of an extra pound. Since the fork does not affect front-end geometry and thus steering, the Grit can make your long rides faster and more comfortable.
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Old 10-25-21, 10:04 AM
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Old 10-25-21, 10:09 AM
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I would argue a small amount of suspension would probably allow most people to ride faster on gravel then if they didn't have it, even with the additional weight. There is a cost to having every single bump raising the bike from it's resting point.
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Old 12-03-21, 06:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Kapusta
This is what most people think that have not tried a light suspension fork like a Lauf. If you ask folks that have tried it the overlap in the middle is actually much larger.

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Old 12-03-21, 08:19 PM
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Originally Posted by dwmckee
This is what most people think that have not tried it..
What do you supposed riding one is going to change? Am I going to suddenly want suspension in places I don’t want it now or want drop bars where I don’t want them now?

Drop bar suspension bikes have been around for 25 years and have never caught on beyond being a niche thing. There is a reason for that.

I have tried a bike with a future shock last year. It was fine, but I did really feel the need for it. I would not buy a bike that had one.

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Old 12-04-21, 06:08 AM
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Originally Posted by dwmckee
This is what most people think that have not tried a light suspension fork like a Lauf. If you ask folks that have tried it the overlap in the middle is actually much larger.
Its the other way around. Its people who have more overlap in the two circles to start with that buy suspension forks.

For me (which is what the Venn diagram represents) that overlap is small. Riding a drop bar bike with suspension does not change that. Are you suggesting that I am going to want drop bars where I do not want them now? Or am I going to want suspension where I donít want it now? If you are going to claim that the overlap is bigger than I think, one of those two things must be true.
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