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New Lynskey Ti Gravel Build

Old 06-03-24, 01:23 PM
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New Lynskey Ti Gravel Build

So, I just scored a GR300 @ $950 from Lynskey!

That price doesn't include a fork, so I need some advice on a fork (42/52 Headset). I don't have much (any?) experience with a gravel bike other than riding a Canyon CF bike for a few miles a couple weeks ago. Great bike but very stiff (rigid).

I'm looking for something with a little more flex.

Any recommendations?

I also need advice on BB width and a few other things.

I’ll probably start with SRAM drivetrain (at least cassette, driver, etc.).
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Old 06-03-24, 01:49 PM
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Nobody is going to do this but one of the fun secrets is that traditional steel forks work really well on ti bikes. Seems that the stiffness (higher modulus of elasticity) of the cantilever steel is a near perfect match feel-wise for the less stiff but all triangulated titanium frame. (Cantilever - think of a diving board. Triangulated - think of a truss style steel bridge. If you want to make that diving board feel like the bridge, you gotta mike it a lot stiffer.)

I ordered my first Ti Cycles '08, inspired by a quick spin I did on the Merlin co-founder's bike almost 20 years before. Of course, the Merlin had a steel fork. Carbon forks barely existed at the time. Kept wondering over the months of the build if I was being a fool to go non-carbon. First ride banished that thought! Three years later I ordered another. I've never had the thought I was missing anything in the years and close to 40k miles since. (Well, there's that pound I have to carry. Oh well.)

And little pluses of that steel that cannot be found in carbon? Your choice of blades, bends, crown, paint, fender eyes, rack mounts, etchings ... (All depending on the framebuilder you go to.) That fork is yours. You won't see it on any other bike.
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Old 06-03-24, 01:56 PM
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Originally Posted by 79pmooney
Nobody is going to do this but one of the fun secrets is that traditional steel forks work really well on ti bikes. Seems that the stiffness (higher modulus of elasticity) of the cantilever steel is a near perfect match feel-wise for the less stiff but all triangulated titanium frame. (Cantilever - think of a diving board. Triangulated - think of a truss style steel bridge. If you want to make that diving board feel like the bridge, you gotta mike it a lot stiffer.)

I ordered my first Ti Cycles '08, inspired by a quick spin I did on the Merlin co-founder's bike almost 20 years before. Of course, the Merlin had a steel fork. Carbon forks barely existed at the time. Kept wondering over the months of the build if I was being a fool to go non-carbon. First ride banished that thought! Three years later I ordered another. I've never had the thought I was missing anything in the years and close to 40k miles since. (Well, there's that pound I have to carry. Oh well.)

And little pluses of that steel that cannot be found in carbon? Your choice of blades, bends, crown, paint, fender eyes, rack mounts, etchings ... (All depending on the framebuilder you go to.) That fork is yours. You won't see it on any other bike.
I was thinking about steel. Thanks for the detail and theory behind it!

I imagine the challenge will be finding a production steel fork that fits a tapered stem. My favorite framebuilder wants $1250 & 8 months to build a custom fork

What does one look for in a production steel fork (besides proper fit, disc mounts, axle)? How do I get an idea it will perform as desired?
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Old 06-03-24, 02:22 PM
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If it is disc brake, flex in the fork is best avoided. However, there is the Lauf fork, and a new generation of very low travel gravel forks. I personally would get an Enve adventure fork with the bosses on the side for mounting stuff (including panniers, if you want). The titanium frame will likely provide the flex you need; it is a much less harsh ride than most carbon. But if you need more, the Redshift stem is a decent option.
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Old 06-03-24, 02:25 PM
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I've just spent the last 10 years on a (custom) steel bike and Enve carbon fork. With wide supple tires (Rene Herse), it has been great to ride on our very rough (Santa Cruz mountain) trails (I'm old and decrepit and got the bike as recovery motivation after a nasty ankle break 11 years ago). The only thing that would improve my setup would be a titanium frame. I just got a FS XC bike, but still prefer to ride this.
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Old 06-03-24, 02:38 PM
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My first thought is an Enve fork.
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Old 06-03-24, 02:45 PM
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This is the one I have in mind. It lists for 2/3 of what your frame cost, but sometimes you can find it for $500:

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Old 06-03-24, 03:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Polaris OBark
This is the one I have in mind. It lists for 2/3 of what your frame cost, but sometimes you can find it for $500:

Thanks! Which model is it?
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Old 06-03-24, 03:08 PM
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Rodeo Spork 3.0 - https://www.rodeo-labs.com/shop/fork...abs-spork-3-0/
Less expensive alternative to the ENVE option and works great with the Lynskey.
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Old 06-03-24, 03:40 PM
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Originally Posted by softreset
Rodeo Spork 3.0 - https://www.rodeo-labs.com/shop/fork...abs-spork-3-0/
Less expensive alternative to the ENVE option and works great with the Lynskey.
That's a great one, too.

Originally Posted by PromptCritical
Thanks! Which model is it?
The Enve one I posted is the Adventure fork.

I would take either of these over what I have now (Gen 1 CX fork), which was the only option at the time.

https://enve.com/collections/forks

Both the Spork and the Enve Adventure fork can work with low-riders and paniers, FWIW. I don't know of any other carbon forks that are officially compatible, if that matters.

My wife's titanium frame came with an Enve "all-road" fork. I don't recommend it, unless it is the only option that fits your frame. (It limits tire size too restrictively).

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Old 06-03-24, 03:55 PM
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Whoa - the price is back up to $1,150. Hope some folks were able to take advantage of it.
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Old 06-03-24, 10:38 PM
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Good lord- you should narrow your fork search by figuring out which forks have the axle to crown(A-C) measurement that your frame needs in order to have the stated geometry be the actual geometry. Next, you should figure out how much trail you want your bike to have, and narrow down your options by the rake/offset measurement.
After that, focus on tire clearance, hose routing, mounts for packs and fenders if you care, and price.


You should Google how much your frame geometry changes with just 10mm of difference in A-C.
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Old 06-04-24, 01:45 AM
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr
Good lord- you should narrow your fork search by figuring out which forks have the axle to crown(A-C) measurement that your frame needs in order to have the stated geometry be the actual geometry. Next, you should figure out how much trail you want your bike to have, and narrow down your options by the rake/offset measurement.
After that, focus on tire clearance, hose routing, mounts for packs and fenders if you care, and price.


You should Google how much your frame geometry changes with just 10mm of difference in A-C.
Great advice - thanks!
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Old 06-04-24, 02:18 AM
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As someone who has a GR300, I'd recommend a fork with a lot of offset, 50mm or better. The GR has north of 70mm of trail with a 45mm offset fork and handles like a Schwinn Varsity. The GR is hands down the worst bike I've ever had for wheel flop and "hunting" at low climbing speeds. With a 45mm offset fork, you better hold onto those bars when you stand to climb or accelerate.
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Old 06-04-24, 05:25 AM
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Lynskey has a couple of fork options for that bike, no drama.
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Old 06-04-24, 06:21 AM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv
Lynskey has a couple of fork options for that bike, no drama.
That would be too easy.
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Old 06-04-24, 08:55 AM
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Originally Posted by nomadmax
As someone who has a GR300, I'd recommend a fork with a lot of offset, 50mm or better. The GR has north of 70mm of trail with a 45mm offset fork and handles like a Schwinn Varsity. The GR is hands down the worst bike I've ever had for wheel flop and "hunting" at low climbing speeds. With a 45mm offset fork, you better hold onto those bars when you stand to climb or accelerate.
Good to know. "Offset" and "rake" are the same, correct?
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Old 06-04-24, 09:17 AM
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Another possibility?...https://whiskyparts.co/forks#/
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Old 06-04-24, 11:08 AM
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Originally Posted by PromptCritical
Good to know. "Offset" and "rake" are the same, correct?
Yes. The distance from axle center to perpendicular to the line of the headtube/steerer. Going steel makes this all so easy. Pick the dimensions you want that give you a level bike (and hence the designed head tube angle), the rake to get the steering quickness you want (and this can be tweaked later; yes at the expense of paint) and all the goodies. Plus, steel fork crowns can be selected that have any width you want and tend to be much shallower than carbon fiber. So you can get far more tire clearance if you want. And will probably get significantly more clearance just picking your crown for looks.

Now, the builder matters. Some like their approach and aren't so flexible on changes. Or have limited crowns to chose from. Others see different as a challenge they thrive on. I'd contact Lynsky for optimum fork geometry, decide on the details (axle/dropout, racks, fender eyes, ... then contact framebuilders and ask if they are comfortable building that. Then, what are their crown choices? And, yes, can they do the tapered steerer? (Does someone like Henry James make crowns for those large steerers? I don't know that stuff. I insisted my ti bikes be 1" steerer. Second bike specifically so I could ride a quill stem that looks so nice and it is so dead easy to vary the height. No regrets.)
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Old 06-05-24, 02:54 AM
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Originally Posted by PromptCritical
Good to know. "Offset" and "rake" are the same, correct?
Yes
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Old 06-07-24, 05:48 PM
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I've been looking at forks and components and I'm wondering what Enve means by "variable" ("49/55.5") with respect to fork rake.

https://enve.com/collections/forks/p...adventure-fork
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Old 06-07-24, 08:02 PM
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Originally Posted by PromptCritical
I've been looking at forks and components and I'm wondering what Enve means by "variable" ("49/55.5") with respect to fork rake.

https://enve.com/collections/forks/p...adventure-fork

the axle hole attachments (for lack of a better term) can be positioned two different ways
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Old 06-07-24, 09:25 PM
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Originally Posted by nomadmax
As someone who has a GR300, I'd recommend a fork with a lot of offset, 50mm or better. The GR has north of 70mm of trail with a 45mm offset fork and handles like a Schwinn Varsity. The GR is hands down the worst bike I've ever had for wheel flop and "hunting" at low climbing speeds. With a 45mm offset fork, you better hold onto those bars when you stand to climb or accelerate.
How much difference does 2-5mm in rake make in terms of handling?
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Old 06-08-24, 12:20 AM
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Anyone have experience with Lightbike wheels?

https://www.lightbicycle.com/AR25-di...symmetric.html

Bitex hubs, 1078grams $916.

Or, Btlos?

Bitex hubs, 1440grams $740

Other good options? I’m comfortable lacing up my own wheels, but these prices are tough to beat
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Old 06-08-24, 04:03 PM
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You are good lacing your own wheels, but you weren't aware of what trail is, didnt know that fork rake and offset are the same, and can't find the site that shows you how much difference in trail a 5mm change in rake is?

That sounds pretty insulting, I'm sure, but I am simply shocked to hear wheels are whats confident in all this, since they are usually the mystery to most, even those who are comfortable with frame geometry.
You can lace wheels and bring em to proper tension?

Bicycle Trail Calculator | yojimg.net
This allows you to figure out trail difference based on tire size, HTA, and fork rake differences.

As for how much difference 5mm of rake is...well some are pretty aware of steering feel and others couldn't care less. 2mm of rake difference is nothing, to me. I can probably feel 5mm of rake difference...and then I would adapt really quickly and not think about it, if the HTA is on the steep side for gravel, because 62mm of trail or 57mm of trail are both numbers I wouldnt hate.


I have btlos wheels with bitex hubs and Pilar Aero spokes laced to 35mm deep carbon rims. They are more wheen than I need and I like em.
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