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Cross bike sizing for 6 feet tall guy: 56" or 58"?

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Cross bike sizing for 6 feet tall guy: 56" or 58"?

Old 08-27-12, 01:31 PM
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Bumer
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Cross bike sizing for 6 feet tall guy: 56" or 58"?

Hello all!

Last week I've ordered Cannondale CAADX 6 Tiagra cross bike. When ordering the bike, LBS did not have any cross bikes in stock, did not do any measurements, and guesstimated that for my height of 6 feet 58" would be proper size.

Today, I've been talking to another LBS, and was told that for my height the proper bike size would be 56", and 58" would be too big.

Now I'm worried that the bike I'm buying at LBS #1 will be too big... which probably means that the bike cannot be properly fitted for me?
In addition, if size 58" is too big for me, how much does that tell me about competency of LBS ordering that bike for me?

Any comments on the issue would be great.

Thank you very much!

Vlad
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Old 08-27-12, 02:05 PM
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I am 6'0" also and just went with a 56" Soma DC. My inseem is about 32" as well.

I'd think for that bike, you would have been put on something with similar geometry from Cannondale. Maybe I'm wrong.
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Old 08-27-12, 02:08 PM
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I am 6'1" and I had a 58 Redline with fit good. Now I have an sworks tricross in a 56 and it fits well too. I personally like the shorter TT with a longer stem for CX.
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Old 08-27-12, 02:24 PM
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I'm 6'0" and have a size 60 Soma Double Cross and a size 59 Pedal Force CX2. Both fit great.

I used a well regarded fitter before buying the Soma.
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Old 08-27-12, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Wardman View Post
I am 6'0" also and just went with a 56" Soma DC. My inseem is about 32" as well.

I'd think for that bike, you would have been put on something with similar geometry from Cannondale. Maybe I'm wrong.
Yep, we are same size. Have you ever tried riding 58"?
I would think that all bikes should have similar geometry, but who knows.

Originally Posted by moralleper View Post
I am 6'1" and I had a 58 Redline with fit good. Now I have an sworks tricross in a 56 and it fits well too. I personally like the shorter TT with a longer stem for CX.
It sounds like it's better to have smaller size than bigger size for cross bike?

******
BTW, going with size 58 also meant going with only CAADX 6 Tiagra. For size 56 I could order CAADX 5 with 105 components.
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Old 08-27-12, 02:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Barrettscv View Post
I'm 6'0" and have a size 60 Soma Double Cross and a size 59 Pedal Force CX2. Both fit great.

I used a well regarded fitter before buying the Soma.
Ok, that sounds better. ) If you can fit well on size 60, chances are 58 might be good fit for me.

Between knowing / feeling if bike is good fit, would I know if it does or does not fit well?
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Old 08-27-12, 02:39 PM
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My size 60 Soma follows the "French Fit" ideal, while my 59 CX2 is more of an Eddie Merckx fit.

Competitive cyclist has a great bike fitting webpage, see: https://www.competitivecyclist.com/za...LCULATOR_INTRO


When we look at the bikes we sell we recognize that most of them descend from the traditions of road racing and long distance riding. There are also bikes for time trialing, cyclocross, and other cycling "disciplines" and each of these has its own traditions and optimal fit options. Very few of us actually race and many of us don't ride as long as we might like, but the bikes we sell can all be fit to suit your preferred riding.

We see three basic styles of road riding fit, each designed to meet clear goals and expectations. We believe that a bicycle that fits your riding style is the one that creates the best experience. We need first to determine what style of fit (or combination of styles) matches you best before we go about achieving a precise, personal fit for you.

The three styles of fit work with the sometimes complementary and sometimes competing objectives of comfort, speed, efficiency, and power. Creating a great fit involves creating priorities among these objectives and knowing yourself. All bikes should fit comfortably, but this priority can be weighed against other objectives. Every choice we make about fit and the bike we choose (frame, fork, model, material, size, parts, etc.) has consequences for our cycling experience. We can explain either by e-mail or telephone how different choices will change your experience and what the advantages and relative compromises will likely be.

For example, the more aerodynamic and "aggressive" Competitive Fit emphasizes speed and efficiency but favors those who can adjust to positions that others will find difficult to maintain over long days in the saddle. In other words, the Competitive Fit may for some become uncomfortable over longer distances or it may not suit those for whom the priority of greater comfort actually increases speed. The slightly more relaxed Eddy Fit adds comfort but compromises some aerodynamic and power efficiency in order to gain endurance and ease. The exceptionally comfortable French Fit understands speed as a feature of comfort and puts power and efficiency in terms of longer endurance goals.

Each of the three styles of fit can be achieved on the same model bicycle, though perhaps not the same size or parts set up. Knowing how you want to ride will help determine what you want to ride.

The Competitive Fit.
It's called the Competitive Fit because it's our signature fit. We've found that this is the look and the feel that most of our customers expect out of their new bike. This is the most "aggressive" fit and suits those with an interest in racing, fast club riding, as well as those with a greater measure of body flexibility to work within the racer's comfort zones. Most modern road bikes, like the majority we offer at Competitive Cyclist, are usually pictured in sales catalogues with the Competitive Fit. But this doesn't mean that you should ride a bike that looks or fits like this.
Wanna look like a pro? This is the fit. It features a low, aerodynamic bar position that places slightly more weight on the hands than on the pedals and saddle, a close knee to pedal spindle ratio that emphasizes power and efficiency, and it puts the rider low in the handlebar drops. Typically the frame chosen will be the smallest that is appropriate. In fact, since the heyday of mountain bikes in the 1990s and more recent studies of professionals looking for an aerodynamic advantage, the Competitive Fit has become most bike shop's conventional wisdom.

After all, who doesn't want to look and ride like a pro? This fit is easy to sell but may not work for you since it actually best suits those who are willing to accept its clear emphasis on speed over comfort. For most of us, the pure Competitive Fit is too extreme even if it is still viable for young riders and racers, for those who love shorter, faster rides, and for those who just find this comfortable. Expect to be rather low even on the tops of the bars where you will spend the majority of your cruising time on the brake hoods, expect too to be lifting your neck slightly to see ahead of you with a rather "short and deep" reach into the bars as you push back on the saddle to stretch out.

The Competitive Fit creates a more compact body position with the chest low and the back as flat as is necessary to get down into the drops. The saddle to handlebar drop is sometimes as much 10cm or more.

The Eddy Fit.
Lots of folks find the Competitive Fit to be ideal. But for those who find its aerodynamic emphasis to be overly aggressive and uncomfortable, the Eddy Fit is almost certain to be ideal for you. It's a position that reminds us of the way Eddy Merckx looked on his bike in the early 1970s, and it dates from well before Eddy's time and continued in the pro peloton well into the 1980s.
There is nothing "dated" about this style of riding. We all know that Eddy, Bernard, and Guiseppe were all very, very fast riders! Bike design has not, in fact, changed that radically since their time---only the look, the fashion, and the style of riding. The Eddy Fit is simply no longer the "fashion" among pros who keep pressing the envelope of comfort to create more efficiency and power.

The Eddy Fit emphasizes less saddle to bar drop. You will notice less exposed seat post on traditional frames and a lower saddle to bar ratio on all fits, including compact designs. Typically it requires a size up of about 2-3cm in frame size from what is today usually offered by in current aero professional look of today. But make no mistake about it, this fit will get you down the road with speed, efficiency, and power.

A few differences from the Competitive Fit in addition to a taller front end and less saddle/bar drop is a less craned neck and easier forward-looking position, slightly less weight on the hands and more on the saddle and pedals, and a knee position that usually moves a bit behind the spindle (rather than a knee-over-the-spindle position, thus adding a bit of power). Bikes set up for the Eddy Fit change their look only subtly in comparison to the Competitive Fit though the results are dramatic in terms of greater comfort. This fit is easier on the neck and shoulders but no less suited for racing or fast solo or club riding.

We adjust this fit by "sizing up" the frame and adjusting the stem lengths to create proper balance, proportion, and to maximize the frame's potential. This position lets you into the drops with less stress on the neck and back and so encourages you to go low into the bars for longer periods. The Eddy Fit typically features a saddle/bar drop of only a few centimeters.

The French Fit.
This fit is so named because of its legacy in the traditions of endurance road riding such as brevet rides and randonneuring. However, the French Fit isn't merely about touring, riding long, or even sitting more upright. It is about getting the most out of a bike that fits larger and provides much more comfort to the neck, back, and saddle position.
While the Competitive Fit generally puts you on the smallest appropriate frame and the Eddy Fit sizes up a bit or raises the bars, the French Fit puts you on the largest appropriate frame. While this bucks some current conventional wisdom - and is, in fact, the least commonly used position of the three we espouse - it is still the position advocated by some of cycling's wisest and most experienced designers, who also happened to be riders who like to go fast and far with an ideal amount of comfort.

This fit features a taller front end (with a larger frame and/or head tube extension and stem), handlebar to saddle drops that are much closer to level, and favors riders who are looking to ease stress on the neck and back, ride as long and as far as they like, and are not concerned with the looking like an aggressive professional. In comparison to the Eddy Fit, the rider has even more weight rearward and a slightly more upright position such that "hands in the drops position" is close to the Competitive Fit's "hands on the hoods position." Some may say that this was not how modern race bikes were "meant" to fit but we have learned that the French Fit's size up tradition works great on the most modern bikes.

By increasing the frame size we raise the bars without radical riser stems and still create balance and proportion with respect to the important knee-to-pedal dynamic. It is important to remember that as frames get larger the top tube effectively shortens. This means that the longer top tube on a larger frame is appropriate because as the bars come "up" and the ratio of saddle to bar drop lessens, the rider achieves a "reach" from the saddle to the handlebars that is just right!

We recommend this fit for riders who really want to be comfortable and fast over longer distances. Please note that the French Fit disregards all emphasis on stand over height (standing with the bike between your legs and your shoes flat on the ground) because the French Fit school believes that this measurement has little actual value regarding fit. An ideal compromise for those who can't shed their concern regarding stand over height is the choice of a "sized up" compact design to achieve a higher relative handlebar position.

Nevertheless, a French Fit can work with traditional, non-sloping frames as well. As an example, a person who might ride a 55cm or 56cm frame to achieve the Competitive Fit, might ride as much as a 59cm or 60cm in the French Fit. While bikes in the French Fit are not the racer's fashion they tend to look elegant, well proportioned, and ride like a dream.

Our Three Styles of Fit are dynamic and flexible programs that are molded to suit your needs and expectations. Elements of one style can be worked into another precisely because there is more than one perfect fit for everyone.

Our promise is to listen carefully to you, work closely with you to provide the confidence and expertise you should expect from a professional bicycle shop, and create an outcome that exceeds your expectations---we want you to have a bike that rides even better than you had dreamt it would. We are happy to discuss our fit philosophy and work out the specifics and details with you.

Buying a great bike starts with great products---and we are committed to brands that have long proven their value and quality. But having the right bike also means buying the one that best suits your riding goals. We work with people using all the resources of our experience, not just fixed formulas or dogmatic notions. If you know what works for you, we are happy to oblige. If you seek our professional advice, we are here to help.

Our aim is to offer you the competitive prices that you deserve, the personal touch of a local bike shop, and the experience of bicycle professionals who are committed to your satisfaction.

2010 Competitive Cyclist
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Old 08-27-12, 04:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Bumer View Post
I would think that all bikes should have similar geometry, but who knows.
Definitely not the case. Some manufacturers use longer top tubes relative to the length of the seat tube: Some use shorter. Some have level top tubes: Some are radically sloping: Some are in between. Some have higher bottom brackets than others. Different manufacturers use different head and seat angles, different chainstay lengths, fork rakes, etc.

Height is a very poor indicator of proper frame size. Example: I am 6' 1" tall. My son is 6' 2" tall. I usually ride a bike with a 59cm seat tube. He usually rides a 53. Why the difference? I have long legs and a short torso: He has a long torso and short legs. We both have a difficult time finding a non-custom bike that will work for us but for opposite reasons: For me, when the seat tube is the right length the top tube is too long. For him the scenario is exactly reversed.

Equally important as seat tube length is top tube length. If the top tube length is wrong you will end up either leaning uncomfortably far out to reach the handlebars or all cramped up hunched over bars that are too close. Yes, you can make some adjustments with stem length and saddle position but only within a fairly narrow range before you start adversely effecting things like steering and balance.

How are you going to use the bike? If strictly for racing then you can use a smaller frame with relatively lower bars since you will only be on it for an hour or so at a time. But if you're buying it for all day rides you will probably want something that allows you to ride a little more upright.

Please don't commit to buying a bike until you have taken it for a good long ride to ensure that it is comfortable for you. If you do a couple of searches you will find lots of useful information about bike fit.

I hope this is helpful.
Brent
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Old 08-27-12, 09:29 PM
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to Barrettscv
Wow! There is science to that! Will have to find time to read through that.

Originally Posted by obrentharris View Post
How are you going to use the bike? If strictly for racing then you can use a smaller frame with relatively lower bars since you will only be on it for an hour or so at a time. But if you're buying it for all day rides you will probably want something that allows you to ride a little more upright.

Please don't commit to buying a bike until you have taken it for a good long ride to ensure that it is comfortable for you. If you do a couple of searches you will find lots of useful information about bike fit.

I hope this is helpful.
Brent
Brent, that is helpful! I'm planning to use the bike not for racing, but for longer rides 30+ miles.
When LBS receives my bike, I will ask them to take it for a ride before paying in full for it.
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Old 08-27-12, 10:01 PM
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I'm 6ft with a 32 inseam and I ride 56.

Felt too stretched out on a 58. Of course seat positioning and a shorter stem would even it out so I don't think it really matters. Perhaps the 56 in a few grams lighter?
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Old 08-28-12, 06:56 AM
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Easy - buy a Felt and ride a 57
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Old 08-28-12, 07:30 AM
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I guess it all comes down to getting the bike in, and then sizing if it can fit me.
We'll see, the bike should be here this week.
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Old 08-28-12, 08:50 AM
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Looks like the 58 has a 57.5cm top tube (horizontal) with 73deg seat tube angle. I am 6'0" and ride a 56 TT with 73.5deg STA, and I consider my bike about spot-on. 1deg of STA = about 1cm TT, so I would say you are in the workable range. A lot depends on your stem & bars.

When you're choosing between two frame sizes, the larger size puts the front wheel a little farther forward, which makes the bike relatively more stable and less agile. In a cross bike, that's not necessarily a bad thing. The larger frame also makes it easier to shoulder...again, not a bad thing. Shorter stem (less PRO) but fewer spacers (more PRO!).

Meh.
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Old 08-28-12, 10:15 AM
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Racing? I'd go for the smaller,A having a cross bike as a ride it to get places, bike?
the larger.

At 5'9" (down an inch from when in my 20's)

I have a 56,a 57, and a 58, bike, all horizontal top tube
the Pinarello ,'90. steel, CX, is the 57, top tube also 57.
for my upper body its 565, on the 56, for the top tube, 9cm stem.

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Old 08-28-12, 11:51 AM
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Originally Posted by flargle View Post
Looks like the 58 has a 57.5cm top tube (horizontal) with 73deg seat tube angle. I am 6'0" and ride a 56 TT with 73.5deg STA, and I consider my bike about spot-on. 1deg of STA = about 1cm TT, so I would say you are in the workable range. A lot depends on your stem & bars.

When you're choosing between two frame sizes, the larger size puts the front wheel a little farther forward, which makes the bike relatively more stable and less agile. In a cross bike, that's not necessarily a bad thing. The larger frame also makes it easier to shoulder...again, not a bad thing. Shorter stem (less PRO) but fewer spacers (more PRO!).

Meh.
Sounds to me like larger frame has many pro.

Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Racing? I'd go for the smaller,A having a cross bike as a ride it to get places, bike?
the larger.

At 5'9" (down an inch from when in my 20's)

I have a 56,a 57, and a 58, bike, all horizontal top tube
the Pinarello ,'90. steel, CX, is the 57, top tube also 57.
for my upper body its 565, on the 56, for the top tube, 9cm stem.
This bike would be for not-racing (at least for now). So, it sounds like bike with larger size might work better for me?

*******

Just got call from LBS that my bike is in, and they will assemble it today, so I can pick it up later today.
Will see if they fit me on it, and how it will feel.

Thanks for the info everyone!
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Old 08-28-12, 12:43 PM
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I wanted to be more upright, so smaller without being stretched was the way I went. I sat on a 56 and it felt good. Hopefully you'll be well fit.

I may add straight bars later in life as well :-)
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Old 08-29-12, 11:08 PM
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6' .05''. I riding 56 cm gray fisher irwine. Racing 56 but if only crusing I would consider strongly 580mm. I even used to have a 60 steel raleigh that rode like a dream.
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Old 08-30-12, 09:45 AM
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5'11.5" True measurement on my height. I ride a 55 Felt (which has a 560mm top tube). swap between 110 and 120 stems depending on conditions.
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Old 08-30-12, 08:52 PM
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I have very similar measurements to you and I ride a 58cm Nashbar cx frame that fits perfectly. 58cm top tube, for reference. I do however use a shorter stem than usual, about 90-100mm
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Old 09-02-12, 04:43 PM
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I'm 6'1 195lbs with a 35.5 inch inseam. My CX rig has only a 55cm seat tube with a 57.5 cm TT. As such, I run a longer seat post and stem (120mm). The bike fits me as good as anything. You can always make a bike bigger, but not smaller - within reasonable measures. Also, I like having a slightly smaller bike that I can whip around turns. One thing - on a smaller bike - be wary of toe-overlap. But if that's not an issue - either bike can be made to fit you with the right equipment (running shorter/longer seat post / stem, stem angle, etc.)
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Old 09-02-12, 05:04 PM
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I've got the bike on Tuesday, and already put ~90 miles on it. First day it felt strange, more of unusual.
Yesterday I did 30 miles ride on it, and today I did 35 miles, both on pavement. The bike feels great, the only thing is that after some time my behind feels uncomfortable.

That being said, the bike seems to fit me well, so 58 is probably my size. I will look for some fitting guide to try and check if anything has to be adjusted.
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Old 09-02-12, 09:33 PM
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Originally Posted by simonaway427 View Post
Easy - buy a Felt and ride a 57
Yep. +1.
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Old 10-29-12, 07:47 PM
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This is by far the best explanation of different fit options and bike sizing. Thanks Competitive Cyclist. Great shop BTW.



Originally Posted by Barrettscv View Post
My size 60 Soma follows the "French Fit" ideal, while my 59 CX2 is more of an Eddie Merckx fit.

Competitive cyclist has a great bike fitting webpage, see: https://www.competitivecyclist.com/za...LCULATOR_INTRO


When we look at the bikes we sell we recognize that most of them descend from the traditions of road racing and long distance riding. There are also bikes for time trialing, cyclocross, and other cycling "disciplines" and each of these has its own traditions and optimal fit options. Very few of us actually race and many of us don't ride as long as we might like, but the bikes we sell can all be fit to suit your preferred riding.

We see three basic styles of road riding fit, each designed to meet clear goals and expectations. We believe that a bicycle that fits your riding style is the one that creates the best experience. We need first to determine what style of fit (or combination of styles) matches you best before we go about achieving a precise, personal fit for you.

The three styles of fit work with the sometimes complementary and sometimes competing objectives of comfort, speed, efficiency, and power. Creating a great fit involves creating priorities among these objectives and knowing yourself. All bikes should fit comfortably, but this priority can be weighed against other objectives. Every choice we make about fit and the bike we choose (frame, fork, model, material, size, parts, etc.) has consequences for our cycling experience. We can explain either by e-mail or telephone how different choices will change your experience and what the advantages and relative compromises will likely be.

For example, the more aerodynamic and "aggressive" Competitive Fit emphasizes speed and efficiency but favors those who can adjust to positions that others will find difficult to maintain over long days in the saddle. In other words, the Competitive Fit may for some become uncomfortable over longer distances or it may not suit those for whom the priority of greater comfort actually increases speed. The slightly more relaxed Eddy Fit adds comfort but compromises some aerodynamic and power efficiency in order to gain endurance and ease. The exceptionally comfortable French Fit understands speed as a feature of comfort and puts power and efficiency in terms of longer endurance goals.

Each of the three styles of fit can be achieved on the same model bicycle, though perhaps not the same size or parts set up. Knowing how you want to ride will help determine what you want to ride.

The Competitive Fit.
It's called the Competitive Fit because it's our signature fit. We've found that this is the look and the feel that most of our customers expect out of their new bike. This is the most "aggressive" fit and suits those with an interest in racing, fast club riding, as well as those with a greater measure of body flexibility to work within the racer's comfort zones. Most modern road bikes, like the majority we offer at Competitive Cyclist, are usually pictured in sales catalogues with the Competitive Fit. But this doesn't mean that you should ride a bike that looks or fits like this.
Wanna look like a pro? This is the fit. It features a low, aerodynamic bar position that places slightly more weight on the hands than on the pedals and saddle, a close knee to pedal spindle ratio that emphasizes power and efficiency, and it puts the rider low in the handlebar drops. Typically the frame chosen will be the smallest that is appropriate. In fact, since the heyday of mountain bikes in the 1990s and more recent studies of professionals looking for an aerodynamic advantage, the Competitive Fit has become most bike shop's conventional wisdom.

After all, who doesn't want to look and ride like a pro? This fit is easy to sell but may not work for you since it actually best suits those who are willing to accept its clear emphasis on speed over comfort. For most of us, the pure Competitive Fit is too extreme even if it is still viable for young riders and racers, for those who love shorter, faster rides, and for those who just find this comfortable. Expect to be rather low even on the tops of the bars where you will spend the majority of your cruising time on the brake hoods, expect too to be lifting your neck slightly to see ahead of you with a rather "short and deep" reach into the bars as you push back on the saddle to stretch out.

The Competitive Fit creates a more compact body position with the chest low and the back as flat as is necessary to get down into the drops. The saddle to handlebar drop is sometimes as much 10cm or more.

The Eddy Fit.
Lots of folks find the Competitive Fit to be ideal. But for those who find its aerodynamic emphasis to be overly aggressive and uncomfortable, the Eddy Fit is almost certain to be ideal for you. It's a position that reminds us of the way Eddy Merckx looked on his bike in the early 1970s, and it dates from well before Eddy's time and continued in the pro peloton well into the 1980s.
There is nothing "dated" about this style of riding. We all know that Eddy, Bernard, and Guiseppe were all very, very fast riders! Bike design has not, in fact, changed that radically since their time---only the look, the fashion, and the style of riding. The Eddy Fit is simply no longer the "fashion" among pros who keep pressing the envelope of comfort to create more efficiency and power.

The Eddy Fit emphasizes less saddle to bar drop. You will notice less exposed seat post on traditional frames and a lower saddle to bar ratio on all fits, including compact designs. Typically it requires a size up of about 2-3cm in frame size from what is today usually offered by in current aero professional look of today. But make no mistake about it, this fit will get you down the road with speed, efficiency, and power.

A few differences from the Competitive Fit in addition to a taller front end and less saddle/bar drop is a less craned neck and easier forward-looking position, slightly less weight on the hands and more on the saddle and pedals, and a knee position that usually moves a bit behind the spindle (rather than a knee-over-the-spindle position, thus adding a bit of power). Bikes set up for the Eddy Fit change their look only subtly in comparison to the Competitive Fit though the results are dramatic in terms of greater comfort. This fit is easier on the neck and shoulders but no less suited for racing or fast solo or club riding.

We adjust this fit by "sizing up" the frame and adjusting the stem lengths to create proper balance, proportion, and to maximize the frame's potential. This position lets you into the drops with less stress on the neck and back and so encourages you to go low into the bars for longer periods. The Eddy Fit typically features a saddle/bar drop of only a few centimeters.

The French Fit.
This fit is so named because of its legacy in the traditions of endurance road riding such as brevet rides and randonneuring. However, the French Fit isn't merely about touring, riding long, or even sitting more upright. It is about getting the most out of a bike that fits larger and provides much more comfort to the neck, back, and saddle position.
While the Competitive Fit generally puts you on the smallest appropriate frame and the Eddy Fit sizes up a bit or raises the bars, the French Fit puts you on the largest appropriate frame. While this bucks some current conventional wisdom - and is, in fact, the least commonly used position of the three we espouse - it is still the position advocated by some of cycling's wisest and most experienced designers, who also happened to be riders who like to go fast and far with an ideal amount of comfort.

This fit features a taller front end (with a larger frame and/or head tube extension and stem), handlebar to saddle drops that are much closer to level, and favors riders who are looking to ease stress on the neck and back, ride as long and as far as they like, and are not concerned with the looking like an aggressive professional. In comparison to the Eddy Fit, the rider has even more weight rearward and a slightly more upright position such that "hands in the drops position" is close to the Competitive Fit's "hands on the hoods position." Some may say that this was not how modern race bikes were "meant" to fit but we have learned that the French Fit's size up tradition works great on the most modern bikes.

By increasing the frame size we raise the bars without radical riser stems and still create balance and proportion with respect to the important knee-to-pedal dynamic. It is important to remember that as frames get larger the top tube effectively shortens. This means that the longer top tube on a larger frame is appropriate because as the bars come "up" and the ratio of saddle to bar drop lessens, the rider achieves a "reach" from the saddle to the handlebars that is just right!

We recommend this fit for riders who really want to be comfortable and fast over longer distances. Please note that the French Fit disregards all emphasis on stand over height (standing with the bike between your legs and your shoes flat on the ground) because the French Fit school believes that this measurement has little actual value regarding fit. An ideal compromise for those who can't shed their concern regarding stand over height is the choice of a "sized up" compact design to achieve a higher relative handlebar position.

Nevertheless, a French Fit can work with traditional, non-sloping frames as well. As an example, a person who might ride a 55cm or 56cm frame to achieve the Competitive Fit, might ride as much as a 59cm or 60cm in the French Fit. While bikes in the French Fit are not the racer's fashion they tend to look elegant, well proportioned, and ride like a dream.

Our Three Styles of Fit are dynamic and flexible programs that are molded to suit your needs and expectations. Elements of one style can be worked into another precisely because there is more than one perfect fit for everyone.

Our promise is to listen carefully to you, work closely with you to provide the confidence and expertise you should expect from a professional bicycle shop, and create an outcome that exceeds your expectations---we want you to have a bike that rides even better than you had dreamt it would. We are happy to discuss our fit philosophy and work out the specifics and details with you.

Buying a great bike starts with great products---and we are committed to brands that have long proven their value and quality. But having the right bike also means buying the one that best suits your riding goals. We work with people using all the resources of our experience, not just fixed formulas or dogmatic notions. If you know what works for you, we are happy to oblige. If you seek our professional advice, we are here to help.

Our aim is to offer you the competitive prices that you deserve, the personal touch of a local bike shop, and the experience of bicycle professionals who are committed to your satisfaction.

2010 Competitive Cyclist
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Old 10-30-12, 07:55 AM
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sxevegan
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I know the OP already bought the bike, but for anyone else wondering, I'm 6' and prefer a 56cm cannondale for CX racing. I also ride a 56cm cannondale on the road.

The standover height of the CAADX is pretty tall due to the traditional non-sloping top tube. If you have a long torso in relation to your legs, you'll want to go with the smaller bike and a longer stem. I know that standover isn't as important as stack and reach, but the 58 still felt awkward being so tall.
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