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Yet another "should I buy" thread (2010 Redline Conquest)

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Yet another "should I buy" thread (2010 Redline Conquest)

Old 09-18-12, 10:57 AM
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Yet another "should I buy" thread (2010 Redline Conquest)

My LBS has a 2010 Redline Conquest that they got on closeout probably last year.

https://www.redlinebicycles.com/archives/2010-conquest
https://www.bikerumor.com/2009/07/14/...locross-bikes/

(These bikes had a recalled front fork, but it's been replaced already.)

I rode it, and I like it. It has good clearance for wider tires, and proper fender bosses. I want something for weekend road/gravel rides, and maybe a gravel road race next year, possibly cross.

There are a couple of issues with it:
  • The frame and fork have disc tabs, but rear dropout spacing is 130mm. Extremely limited options there, so it pretty much makes this a rim brake bike. This is okay with me.
  • I'm a Clyde, and the 20/24h wheels would need to go.
On the other hand, I can get it for a song. Like less than 50% of MSRP. What do you think? Skip it and find something that I don't need to swap parts on immediately, or jump on a really smokin' deal?
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Old 09-18-12, 11:57 AM
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Sounds like a good deal to me. Disc hubs with 130mm are becoming a little more common. They're at least out there. The 9-speed Tiagra stuff is pretty decent. Half of MSRP (~$500?) sounds like about what you'd pay for a four-year old used bike with similar components. New wheels are always a good upgrade for entry-level cross bikes anyway. Depending on how you ride, the 20/24 wheels might work as a road wheelset. I'm a mini-Clyde (~205 pounds) and had no problems at all with a 20/24 Mavic Aksium wheelset for road riding. I don't know anything about the wheels on the Redline though.
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Old 09-18-12, 01:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Andy_K
Sounds like a good deal to me. Disc hubs with 130mm are becoming a little more common. They're at least out there. The 9-speed Tiagra stuff is pretty decent. Half of MSRP (~$500?) sounds like about what you'd pay for a four-year old used bike with similar components. New wheels are always a good upgrade for entry-level cross bikes anyway. Depending on how you ride, the 20/24 wheels might work as a road wheelset. I'm a mini-Clyde (~205 pounds) and had no problems at all with a 20/24 Mavic Aksium wheelset for road riding. I don't know anything about the wheels on the Redline though.
MSRP is $1400, so a little more than that. I've been hearing things about 130mm disc hubs, but it's not something I can just go and buy from Universal or BWW at the moment.

Thanks for the perspective on the 20/24h wheelset. What are the factors there, primarily road surface, or things like mashing up hills? Obviously they're not going to stay true under heavier weight on rough surfaces like gravel or a cross course.
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Old 09-18-12, 10:40 PM
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I have the 2011 Conquest Pro and my daughter has the 2010 Conquest. They are superior bikes that are fun to ride! Sounds like a good deal to me.
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Old 09-19-12, 06:38 PM
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If you don't plan to run discs the 130 spacing is not a problem. If you do it will make it a considerable hassle. This is coming from the former owner of a 130 spaced alloy disc-only frame.

The wheels may surprise you, but if you're concerned about it sell them off for a few bucks before you do any damage.
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Old 09-20-12, 07:36 AM
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Thanks for the input. I think I'll pull the trigger on this and order up a wheelset from https://velomine.com/, probably Mavic A319 or Open Pro. I'll run rim brakes for a while and keep my eyes open for 130 disc options in the future.
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Old 09-20-12, 10:45 AM
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Originally Posted by jdoff
MSRP is $1400, so a little more than that. I've been hearing things about 130mm disc hubs, but it's not something I can just go and buy from Universal or BWW at the moment.
Here's one: https://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...&category=2601

A bit spendy, but nice.


Originally Posted by jdoff
Thanks for the perspective on the 20/24h wheelset. What are the factors there, primarily road surface, or things like mashing up hills? Obviously they're not going to stay true under heavier weight on rough surfaces like gravel or a cross course.
The biggest factor is how well the wheel is built. If the tension is high and even, the wheel is likely to do well. The wheels on that Redline are probably machine-built, but if the shop has a good wheel builder and he/she checks them out, they could work for you.

Otherwise, I'd say riding style and tire volume/pressure are the other biggest factors. If you ride over rough terrain slightly out of the saddle and with your arms and legs slightly bent, it takes a lot of the impact off the wheels. If you avoid hitting large obstacles at speed, that helps too. High volume tires with low air pressure will absorb small impacts, but if you get the pressure too low the rim can get hit directly.

But really, my understanding is that wheels going out of true is a product of momentary imbalances in spoke tension. When you hit something hard, it detensions the spokes on the impact side temporarily. The same thing happens on a smaller scale just from normal riding as the wheels hold your weight. Ideally when the pressure is relieved things go back to normal, but if the spoke is twisted (which they often are, especially on machine built wheels) it can unwind a bit in this moment of reduced tension and so the tension is lost longer term. Loss of spoke tension is what causes a wheel to be out of true (assuming the rim doesn't collapse). If starting spoke tension was really high, there's a chance of rim collapse during an impact, but that's fairly uncommon with decent quality rims.

The thing about high spoke count wheels is that they're great for reliability. More spokes work together to absorb changes in tension with less impact on each individual spoke and with the spokes closer together it takes a bigger change in tension to cause a wobble in the wheel, so they're more fault tolerant. If you're going on a tour or riding to work, you want to eliminate risk of mechanical failure, so high spoke counts make sense. For CX racing, you generally have a higher tolerance for random failures, because mechanicals are just a fact of life and you can either run to the pit or take a DNF and come back next week. For recreational rides, it's usually sufficient to carry a tool with a spoke wrench.
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Old 09-20-12, 11:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Andy_K
Here's one: https://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...&category=2601

A bit spendy, but nice.
I did see that one, but was looking more seriously at this one:

https://www.bdopcycling.com/Hubs-CX.asp#D352SB

I've read some mixed reports, but overall it seems like it would be worth trying.

But really, my understanding is that wheels going out of true is a product of momentary imbalances in spoke tension. When you hit something hard, it detensions the spokes on the impact side temporarily. The same thing happens on a smaller scale just from normal riding as the wheels hold your weight. Ideally when the pressure is relieved things go back to normal, but if the spoke is twisted (which they often are, especially on machine built wheels) it can unwind a bit in this moment of reduced tension and so the tension is lost longer term. Loss of spoke tension is what causes a wheel to be out of true (assuming the rim doesn't collapse). If starting spoke tension was really high, there's a chance of rim collapse during an impact, but that's fairly uncommon with decent quality rims.
Thanks for this explanation. They effects of dynamic loading make a lot of sense, and kind of ties in to a conversation I was having with a buddy about butted spokes earlier today. His experience has been that double butted spokes need attention much less frequently than straight spokes, probably because they handle the dynamic loading you're talking about better.

The thing about high spoke count wheels is that they're great for reliability. More spokes work together to absorb changes in tension with less impact on each individual spoke and with the spokes closer together it takes a bigger change in tension to cause a wobble in the wheel, so they're more fault tolerant. If you're going on a tour or riding to work, you want to eliminate risk of mechanical failure, so high spoke counts make sense. For CX racing, you generally have a higher tolerance for random failures, because mechanicals are just a fact of life and you can either run to the pit or take a DNF and come back next week. For recreational rides, it's usually sufficient to carry a tool with a spoke wrench.
CX kinda scares me at this point, but is something I want to try eventually. For now, this bike will be for weekend road/gravel rides and a few gravel road races next spring. High spoke count seems like a good idea for that, and I don't really see a down-side for CX either, assuming a not-massive rim like the Open Pro.
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Old 09-20-12, 11:59 AM
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Originally Posted by jdoff
Thanks for this explanation. They effects of dynamic loading make a lot of sense, and kind of ties in to a conversation I was having with a buddy about butted spokes earlier today. His experience has been that double butted spokes need attention much less frequently than straight spokes, probably because they handle the dynamic loading you're talking about better.
There's something to that, I think. The only hitch is that butted spokes twist a lot more during the building process. If the builder takes care to avoid that, they're definitely better.


Originally Posted by jdoff
CX kinda scares me at this point, but is something I want to try eventually.
Don't be afraid just because you hear things like CX being described as "an hour in hell." It is hell, but it's pure, sweet hell.

Seriously, try it. It's fun.


Originally Posted by jdoff
For now, this bike will be for weekend road/gravel rides and a few gravel road races next spring. High spoke count seems like a good idea for that, and I don't really see a down-side for CX either, assuming a not-massive rim like the Open Pro.
Yeah, more spokes are definitely better for non weight weenies. I use 32-spokes on my CX race bike.
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Old 09-29-12, 02:12 PM
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A happy ending:



The LBS threw in a different saddle (the stock Selle Italia Q-Bik was narrower than I usually ride, and they had a WTB SST which I like on my Surly LHT), and a slightly better pair of tires (Bontrager H2). It was missing the Maxxis CX tires that came on it, and had a pair of heavy hybrid tires on it, though the Bontrager H2s aren't anything amazing. They'll be fine for now.

Keen eyes will notice that there are a few more spokes in play now. 36h Mavic Open Pros, straight DT spokes, Shimano 105 hubs. I'm very happy with the arrangement so far, though I don't have too many miles on it yet.

Anyway, it spins up much faster than my Surly LHT (shocking), and it handles much quicker, though I can definitely feel the road more. I didn't put too much thought into the 35-25 low gear before buying, and it's pretty hilly around here, so there might be some HTFU-ing in my near future.
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Old 09-29-12, 04:47 PM
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Originally Posted by jdoff
A happy ending: I can definitely feel the road more. I didn't put too much thought into the 35-25 low gear before buying, and it's pretty hilly around here, so there might be some HTFU-ing in my near future.
just swap the cassette for a MTB with a 32T low. With 35c cross tires at 60psi (or lower) you shouldn't notice the road vibrations from the aluminum frame - nice looking ride. Now just sign up on BikeReg for the next Cat 4 beginners race - you will be hooked.
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Old 09-29-12, 05:09 PM
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I think the biggest I can go with the 105 RD is a 27. But so far I've made it up all the usual climbs, just with more standing and mashing than usual, so I'll stick with this cassette for now.

I ran at 70/80 PSI today but found I didn't really need to, I just went with the pressures I use on my (typically somewhat loaded) touring bike.
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