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Carbon fork? yes or no

Old 08-28-14, 09:34 PM
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Carbon fork? yes or no

Hey all!

I have recently purchased a nashbar steel cyclocross bike to add to my stable (also to get back into gears). Rides smooth and is a real joy to ride with the 105 groupo.

Been looking at potentially adding a carbon fork to the rig. Currently has a standard nashbar steel fork with cantilevers and eyelets for fenders or racks.

The current fork isn't causing me any issues just wondering if i would see a big benefit by adding a carbon fork?

I was mainly looking at the nashbar carbon fork for 120 or a ritchey carbon cross fork for 165 (ritchey has no eyelets which is a bummer but i can use the steel fork for future touring if iget that far)

WHat do y'all think? Would it be a worthy investment or should I look to invest the money elsewhere?

I should mention I'm doing light touring (manly sub 24 your trips but upwards of 2-3 days) as well as some gravel riding and a lot of trail riding (asphalt, packed gravel, loose gravel ect)

Last edited by destroypedal; 08-28-14 at 10:04 PM.
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Old 08-29-14, 06:56 AM
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About the only benefit is weight. You're looking at about a 400g difference (low-cost carbon CX forks usually weigh in around 650g). I actually prefer the way a good steel fork rides. The low-cost carbon CX forks can be a bit flexy for my taste.
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Old 08-29-14, 08:39 AM
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Not sure I'd use the carbon fork for the touring aspect. You could, but it'd be taking a chance. I don't believe you'll see any difference with just a fork swap. I'd stick with the current fork you have and maybe save up for a dedicated race bike later if that's the route you want to take your riding after doing cross for a season or two.
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Old 08-29-14, 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Kopsis
About the only benefit is weight. You're looking at about a 400g difference (low-cost carbon CX forks usually weigh in around 650g).
good to know! The ritchey comes in right at 500 grams so about a pound difference on the weight. nothing too different so maybe ill skip. My friend said i could borrow his carbon cross fork for a bit so I might just try it out and decide. but I don't think ill notice much on a heavy frame like this.
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Old 09-07-14, 04:38 AM
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For touring - I wouldn't bother. If you were going to do anything else, then you might want to consider it. The problem with some steel forks on lower-end bikes is fork shudder. I run a Richey Carbon Comp Cross on mine - it's the next model up from yours but is $100 more. I personally like the carbon fork better - it weighs less and is as strong as steel (in theory). Ultimately - if I were you - I would just ride it as is as see how it goes and then consider upgrading at some point.
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Old 09-17-14, 03:16 PM
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Fork Wars da final on Vimeo no carbinooooo
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Old 09-17-14, 04:53 PM
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Not necessary on a steel frame. On an alloy frame, a carbon fork will dampen the ride and make riding feel smooth.
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Old 09-18-14, 08:45 AM
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Originally Posted by NormanF
Not necessary on a steel frame. On an alloy frame, a carbon fork will dampen the ride and make riding feel smooth.
Not to get all technical, but chromoly (i.e. steel frame) is an alloy.
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Old 09-18-14, 12:05 PM
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It's Not for me to decide.. you should do that for yourself ..
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Old 09-18-14, 12:38 PM
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If riding anything rougher or bumpier than chip seal roads, I prefer a steel fork. My 29er used to sport a carbon fork, but I switched over to a steel unicrown fork for a softer ride (and better tire clearance). The only 'drawback' is a minor weight penalty, but in all honesty, I don't notice it.

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Old 09-18-14, 12:50 PM
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I liked the ZERTs carbon forks on my specialized so much, that they are now on my newer Trek hybrid. It's light, rides nice, and makes bicycle snobs hate me.
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Old 09-18-14, 11:56 PM
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Originally Posted by 64ParamountrRC
I'm not exactly sure how well this reflects the stresses a fork would see on the road... If I take a baseball bat to a fork of any material, the fork is toast.
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Old 09-29-14, 03:44 PM
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I think it's demonstrating the type of failure one might expect, as opposed to which material is more invulnerable to damage.
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