Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational)
Reload this Page >

trying to find more functional replacement for road bike

Notices
Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational) This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like : "Unbound Gravel". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.

trying to find more functional replacement for road bike

Old 12-26-14, 10:49 PM
  #1  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 33
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
trying to find more functional replacement for road bike

I have in the past had a BikesDirect Motobecane Le Champion with Ultegra and I liked it but the gearing didnt work for me and it was too much of a race geometry. I stopped riding and sold all my stuff because i had no drive for it at the time. A couple months ago i had the urge to ride and bought a $200 Cannondale R600 with 9 speed 105. It has served me well and has proved that I have the desire. I have even thought of upgrading the bike bit by bit but to start with it is one, if not one and a half sizes too big. I am 6'3" but dont have the inseam of other gentleman my height (34") and the used bike was so cheap because of its large size. My wife will be taking on a very good job that starts in Charlotte in May, we are there for 8 months and then we could be almost anywhere in the continental US for any period of time.

Uses for the bike:
what my Cannondale is now, a recreational fitness road bike. No racing ever planned.
Tow bike - I will buy a trailer for my newborn daughter as she grows up.
Ability to handle sub par roads including gravel and weather (mild snow, mud, etc.)

bike details:
I would like to meet all these points since they are not too hard
first Priority is Price - I think I can get what I want to start for less then $1500
relaxed geometry (possibly compact frame) - I want comfort and have no plans to race
Shimano 105 11 speed - Not a requirement but a preference
no regular gear crank - Compact for more road-centric and cyclocross gearing is fine
bailout cog on cassette - towing trailer up steep hills could be painful depending where I am
Disc brakes - for trailer and lack of knowledge of where I will live.

Possible bike options I have seen:

Fuji - Sportif 1.1 Disc - easy to find a Performance Bike shop when moving around (advantage but, well, its Performance Bike). Con: Dont know if it can fit up to say, a 32c wheel

Diamondback - Hanjo Comp - Best deal is Amazon it seems which means NO shop support unless paid for. 105 is last gen which means 20 speed

Norco - Threshold Alu 105 - Pro: like the color (black with yellow letters), Has internal cable routing Con:Can't find a local dealer

Cannondale - Synapse 105 Disc - probably one of the front runners, name brand, REI purchasable for national support both at store and manufacture level, internal cable routing. Maybe issues with larger tires?

Cannondale - CAADX - maybe beefier then the synapse but all the cable routing bothers me when I compare the two. I realize the need in Cycle-cross but not for me

GT - Grade Alloy 105 - I really like the idea of what this bike was built for and the slightly unique look but it is actually one of the more expensive on this list and the crank is listed everywhere as a 52/36 which is easy enough to change but.....I don't want to buy the most expensive to have to change something

Kona - Jake the Snake - Outside my price range but have a bicycle mechanic friend who has contacts to get them for inside my price range. ONLY thing I seem to not like is the color.


Looking for everyones opinion. any favorites or something thats not on the list? I may start to try some test rides after some of your feedback and am planning on purchasing in late January/February.
jdotconnor is offline  
Old 12-27-14, 10:05 AM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 968
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 113 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
I'd look for a Fuji Cross:
Fuji Bikes | ROAD | CYCLOCROSS SERIES | CROSS 1.5 DISC

I've had two of them (minus disc brakes) and they are great do it all bikes.

Also check out one of Bianchi's cross offerings:
Zurigo Tiagra Disc | Bianchi USA
09box is offline  
Old 12-27-14, 10:26 AM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 20,441

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 178 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5893 Post(s)
Liked 3,480 Times in 2,081 Posts
Cross, gravel, and touring bikes all fit your requirements. At $1500, you have a lot of options. The cheapest is obviously internet direct. The motobecane fantom cxx 100 ticks those boxes at $799. That's a tempting price.
bikemig is offline  
Old 12-27-14, 03:14 PM
  #4  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 33
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by 09box
I'd look for a Fuji Cross:
Fuji Bikes | ROAD | CYCLOCROSS SERIES | CROSS 1.5 DISC

I've had two of them (minus disc brakes) and they are great do it all bikes.

Also check out one of Bianchi's cross offerings:
Zurigo Tiagra Disc | Bianchi USA
my only problem with these 2 is neither being 11 speed and I've noticed the true cyclocross bikes have messy cable routing for easier shouldering. Since I won't need to shoulder I like the look of the "gravel" bikes better, especially if they have the internal routing if possible.
jdotconnor is offline  
Old 12-27-14, 03:20 PM
  #5  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 33
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bikemig
Cross, gravel, and touring bikes all fit your requirements. At $1500, you have a lot of options. The cheapest is obviously internet direct. The motobecane fantom cxx 100 ticks those boxes at $799. That's a tempting price.
That one seems great for the price. 22 speed, cro-mo frame but the weight won't be an issue and it may ride smoother from what I understand of frame materials (not much). The cantilever brakes instead of discs I hadn't considered. I have heard you have to stay on top of them to stay adjusted. True?
jdotconnor is offline  
Old 12-27-14, 03:27 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Roadbikedude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: NW suburb of MPLS MN
Posts: 101

Bikes: 2012 Specialized Roubaix SL3, Specialized Tricross Comp, Specialized Expedition, Borus X7 Fat Bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Look at cross bikes from Specialized, Ridley, Fuji, etc. My Specialized Tricross has a triple in front and I can change the tires up to 38's. Road, gravel, single track, you name it. Has a more upright geometry than a road bike and always makes for a fun ride.
Roadbikedude is offline  
Old 12-27-14, 03:47 PM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 20,441

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 178 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5893 Post(s)
Liked 3,480 Times in 2,081 Posts
Originally Posted by jdotconnor
That one seems great for the price. 22 speed, cro-mo frame but the weight won't be an issue and it may ride smoother from what I understand of frame materials (not much). The cantilever brakes instead of discs I hadn't considered. I have heard you have to stay on top of them to stay adjusted. True?
Cantis were the std for a long time. They work well. You do need to know how to adjust them properly but you can get advice for how to to that here or online. Once adjusted properly, they're not particularly fiddly; they stay adjusted reasonably well. I like cantilevers.
bikemig is offline  
Old 12-27-14, 03:51 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Show-Me State
Posts: 397
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Consider an All-City Space Horse:
Space Horse | All-City Cycles
Universal Cycles -- All-City Space Horse Complete Bike 2013

I have one and love it. The geometry is a mix between road, touring, and cross-racing. The riding position is upright, so it is super-comfortable. I'm running 700x42's on it for riding gravel. It is really versatile - I ride it on pavement, gravel, and even singletrack. It is definitely a do-everything bike, that isn't expensive.

The complete bike parts kit is so-so, but isn't bad either. I custom built mine from a frameset, so I have all the parts to my liking. You also won't see very many people riding around on one, and I get compliments on mine all the time because it is kind of unique and has classic styling.
DirtRoadRunner is offline  
Old 12-27-14, 05:28 PM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
Kopsis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: St. Pete, Florida
Posts: 1,258
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
"Comfort" means different things to different riders. It would be helpful if you could identify the specific characteristics that you found made your R600 a comfortable ride for you. And if comfort is your number two priority, you should be very careful with Cyclocross bikes. Many are designed to race 'cross and as such have to be very nimble and able to handle huge bursts of power. As a result, they can have fairly aggressive geometry and frames designed for stiffness (both for power transfer and durability) without a lot of regard for ride quality. On your list the Norco, CAADX, and JtS might be more race-oriented than you want.

Also keep in mind that it's entirely possible that you are benefiting from the frame being "too large". You're likely running the saddle pretty low given your inseam. On a large frame that's likely going to reduce saddle to bar drop, putting you in a more upright position. In addition, the large frame's reach may actually be appropriate for someone of your height with a long torso. Probably a good idea to have a competent shop take a look at your current fit and offer some suggestions.
Kopsis is offline  
Old 12-27-14, 09:53 PM
  #10  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 33
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Kopsis
"Comfort" means different things to different riders. It would be helpful if you could identify the specific characteristics that you found made your R600 a comfortable ride for you. And if comfort is your number two priority, you should be very careful with Cyclocross bikes. Many are designed to race 'cross and as such have to be very nimble and able to handle huge bursts of power. As a result, they can have fairly aggressive geometry and frames designed for stiffness (both for power transfer and durability) without a lot of regard for ride quality. On your list the Norco, CAADX, and JtS might be more race-oriented than you want.

Also keep in mind that it's entirely possible that you are benefiting from the frame being "too large". You're likely running the saddle pretty low given your inseam. On a large frame that's likely going to reduce saddle to bar drop, putting you in a more upright position. In addition, the large frame's reach may actually be appropriate for someone of your height with a long torso. Probably a good idea to have a competent shop take a look at your current fit and offer some suggestions.
Great points. I think the r600 is more of a race geometry and you are most likely right that my saddle being lower makes the bike fit me more up right. Any direction I go will get a proper fitting. The more I research it I think what I'm really looking for is an "endurance" road bike that can fit larger (say 32c tires) which disc brakes may be more likely to allow.
jdotconnor is offline  
Old 12-27-14, 10:44 PM
  #11  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: SGV So Cal
Posts: 884

Bikes: 80's Schwinn High Plains, Motobecane Ti Cyclocross

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 108 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 30 Times in 21 Posts
You might want to check out the Motobecane CX offerings. You can get into one of the Ti ones for near your price range. Flip the steerer over and move the stack under for a more relaxed fit.

Rear rack brazeons and you can run tires as big as 42mm. The "messy" cable routing quickly becomes a non issue. the interrupters on the brakes are really handy if you ride on the tops most of the time or tend to make "wrong turns" down single tracks (even if the purists hate them).


The CX gearing is really more practical than a traditional compact on the top end. You practically need to pedal off of a cliff to spin out on a 50-11. If you have a lot of steep up, you can swap out the 36 for a 34 small ring for just a few bucks. An 11 speed 11-32 really gives you the better spacing of a 12-32 10 speed with a relatively useless 11 tooth cog added on.
TGT1 is offline  
Old 12-28-14, 09:25 AM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Show-Me State
Posts: 397
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by TGT1
You might want to check out the Motobecane CX offerings. You can get into one of the Ti ones for near your price range. Flip the steerer over and move the stack under for a more relaxed fit.

Rear rack brazeons and you can run tires as big as 42mm. The "messy" cable routing quickly becomes a non issue. the interrupters on the brakes are really handy if you ride on the tops most of the time or tend to make "wrong turns" down single tracks (even if the purists hate them).


The CX gearing is really more practical than a traditional compact on the top end. You practically need to pedal off of a cliff to spin out on a 50-11. If you have a lot of steep up, you can swap out the 36 for a 34 small ring for just a few bucks. An 11 speed 11-32 really gives you the better spacing of a 12-32 10 speed with a relatively useless 11 tooth cog added on.
The Motobecane bikes do look to be a great value, and actually has good components and gearing for an all-arounder. With the suggested swap of the 36t little ring for a 34t (the ring should cost $30 or so), they would be useable for climbing steep hills or pulling a kid trailer.

However, they still have the normal CX geometry, with a high bottom bracket and short headtube, and short-ish chainstays (430 mm). Adding a 17 degree stem may help raise the bars up a bit too, but I think a more relaxed frame is always be best way to go, rather than trying to make a racing designed frame comfortable for all-day riding.

Another option would be the Salsa Vaya 3 ($1500), which is really a light-touring bike, but the components are not anywhere near as nice as the Motobecanes at the same price point.

BTW, I went from a typical CX-race geometry gravel bike to a more relaxed all-arounder (the Space Horse), and found the Space Horse much more comfortable, capable, and stable for long rides, with almost no difference in speed. I can ride the bike for hours with zero back pain (unlike my more aggressive road bike). CX racing geometry just isn't ideal for recreational riding. The only disadvantage of the more relaxed bike is that I have to be a bit more careful on singletrack, due to the lower bottom-bracket.
DirtRoadRunner is offline  
Old 12-30-14, 02:57 PM
  #13  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Whatever you decide, it would be best to get a triple crank. Lugging my kid up a hill is a chore and even with compact/CX gearing, it would not be too easy. I stand and mash when I can, but trailer up a hill means sit and spin.
2:01 is offline  
Old 12-30-14, 03:41 PM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 968
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 113 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by 2:01
Whatever you decide, it would be best to get a triple crank. Lugging my kid up a hill is a chore and even with compact/CX gearing, it would not be too easy. I stand and mash when I can, but trailer up a hill means sit and spin.
+1

I am glad I got a bike with a triple crank. Hills are a breeze.
09box is offline  
Old 07-06-15, 07:08 PM
  #15  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 33
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Well, the deed is done. About a week before the move here to Charlotte I sold the Cannondale for what I bought it for (great investment). We've been here about a month and went and made my purchase. I had been looking and the disc brake versions of the Fuji Sportif had been looking better and better. I ran across a "performance bike only" model called the "Sportif 1.0 LE". It's basically just the 1.1D (105 group, mechanical disc brakes, same frame) with a different, and nicer, color scheme. It is not stocked in stores so I went to the store, checked the fitment on the large frame, a compact 58 on another Sportif frame, and ordered it.
jdotconnor is offline  
Old 07-06-15, 08:33 PM
  #16  
is just a real cool dude
 
Henry III's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: The Thumb, MI
Posts: 3,165
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 34 Times in 14 Posts
I'm not huge on Bike direct but the Ti Motobacon Fantom with 105 for under 1500 is a killer deal. If I had 2000 to play with I'd pick up the full Ultegra model but the 105 would suit me fine or the Rival.
Henry III is offline  
Old 07-06-15, 10:54 PM
  #17  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 19
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jdotconnor
Well, the deed is done. About a week before the move here to Charlotte I sold the Cannondale for what I bought it for (great investment). We've been here about a month and went and made my purchase. I had been looking and the disc brake versions of the Fuji Sportif had been looking better and better. I ran across a "performance bike only" model called the "Sportif 1.0 LE". It's basically just the 1.1D (105 group, mechanical disc brakes, same frame) with a different, and nicer, color scheme. It is not stocked in stores so I went to the store, checked the fitment on the large frame, a compact 58 on another Sportif frame, and ordered it.
Congrats on the purchase. I looked at the Sportif but no room for any larger than 28mm tires, unfortunately. Ended up with a Felt V85 for the same price which also has a 105 crankset and TRP Spyre brakes, both upgrades over the components on the Fuji.
RJ80 is offline  
Old 07-07-15, 07:02 AM
  #18  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 33
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Was the one you looked at a disc brake model? IT comes equipped with 28s. The only place it looks like there might be width limitations is the seat or chain stays but, even then shod be good for 32s. The front fork has a ton of clearance. When I get it I will measure for people interested in the future.
jdotconnor is offline  
Old 07-07-15, 06:52 PM
  #19  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 19
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jdotconnor
Was the one you looked at a disc brake model? IT comes equipped with 28s. The only place it looks like there might be width limitations is the seat or chain stays but, even then shod be good for 32s. The front fork has a ton of clearance. When I get it I will measure for people interested in the future.
Yeah, the Felt only comes with disc brakes, which I wanted. The Felt does come stock with 28s which is good for on-road stuff, but allows a max up to 38 which I wanted for gravel capability. I asked the guy at performance about the max on the Fuji and he said he said 32s would be a squeeze at the rear with the limited clearance at the seat and crank stays. Remember, you should have at least 5mm of clearance between the tire and stays however large you choose to go.
RJ80 is offline  
Old 07-08-15, 02:57 PM
  #20  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 968
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 113 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Save up to 60% off new Road Bikes - Gravity Liberty 2 | Save up to 60% off new road bikes

Save Up to 60% Off Touring Bikes | Commuting | Commuter Bikes | Windsor Bikes - Tourist

Save Up to 60% Off Touring Bikes | Commuting | Commuter Bikes | Motobecane Bikes - Gran Turismo for touring the country there is nothing better

Save Up to 60% Off Disc Brake Road Bikes - Motobecane Turino Disc
09box is offline  
Old 07-09-15, 03:04 PM
  #21  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 5,737
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 147 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
My Schwinn Super Sport DBX was the first adventure bike equipped with disc brakes. And it accepts 35 c tires with fenders.

I run it as a commuter. Its heavier than a road bike but I have no regrets.

Its a descendant of the sports touring bike of the old days that fell between a true road bike and the utility bike.
NormanF is offline  
Old 07-10-15, 12:59 PM
  #22  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 33
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
So the chain stays are the narrow portion that would limit the rear tires.

Bike at a glance. Haven't had a chance to adjust anything. When I picked it up it was raining and my wife had dropped me off to ride home. I was in a hurry to get home the 5 miles before the storm hit. I just made it.

Only thing I bought was the water bottle cage and the performance brand dual use pedals (platform/SPD, copies of shimano A530) I will use it with street shoes for runs to the store and road/gravel riding.


Front fork tire clearance. Room for days


Rear seat stay clearance. Not bad.


The limiting factor. Chain-stay clearance from bottom.

Going on a small ride either tonight or tomorrow for the first time in Charlotte.
jdotconnor is offline  
Old 07-10-15, 02:16 PM
  #23  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,357 Times in 863 Posts
can you test ride all these?

Fuji - Sportif 1.1 Disc - easy to find a Performance Bike shop when moving around (advantage but, well, its Performance Bike). Con: Dont know if it can fit up to say, a 32c wheel

Diamondback - Hanjo Comp - Best deal is Amazon it seems which means NO shop support unless paid for. 105 is last gen which means 20 speed



Cannondale - Synapse 105 Disc - probably one of the front runners, name brand, REI purchasable for national support both at store and manufacture level, internal cable routing. Maybe issues with larger tires?

Cannondale - CAADX - maybe beefier then the synapse but all the cable routing bothers me when I compare the two. I realize the need in Cycle-cross but not for me

GT - Grade Alloy 105 - I really like the idea of what this bike was built for and the slightly unique look but it is actually one of the more expensive on this list and the crank is listed everywhere as a 52/36 which is easy enough to change but.....I don't want to buy the most expensive to have to change something

Kona - Jake the Snake - Outside my price range but have a bicycle mechanic friend who has contacts to get them for inside my price range. ONLY thing I seem to not like is the color.
Go do test rides.. they all are competing in the marketplace for your money .

It's a combination of the parts list (various costs) and a big factory making many different brands, for various Importers

at least the Kona You know the shop and I assume like doing business there .

Last edited by fietsbob; 07-10-15 at 02:21 PM.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 07-12-15, 08:23 PM
  #24  
The Freewheeler
 
the_freewheeler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: ATL/CHI
Posts: 225

Bikes: '37 Iver Johnson Racer, '44 BSA Airborne, '45 Swiss Militarvelo, '92 Fat City Slim Chance, '97 Pinarello Monviso, '03 Giant TCR Composite, '12 Bianchi Super Pista, '15 Humble CX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Check out the Niner RLT 9, 2 Star (w/ 105 group). Pretty legit bike well below your price point, at $1049.

RLT 9
the_freewheeler is offline  
Old 07-20-15, 10:16 AM
  #25  
Senior Member
 
snow_echo_NY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Montpelier VT
Posts: 855

Bikes: Scott Genius, Surly Crosscheck, Yuba Mundo cargo, Specialized Dolce Triple (stolen 5/8/15)

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Triple crankset seems ideal. i had a triple crank on my road bike that was fine for towing. but with a compact it's pretty impossible up hills for extended times.

is it possible to get a 3rd crank added to my double as is? there is a place for it...
snow_echo_NY is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.