Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational)
Reload this Page >

Help select Fuji sportif 2.5 vs gravity liberty 3

Notices
Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational) This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like : "Unbound Gravel". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.

Help select Fuji sportif 2.5 vs gravity liberty 3

Old 01-01-15, 04:34 PM
  #1  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Help select Fuji sportif 2.5 vs gravity liberty 3

Save up to 60% off new Road Bikes - Gravity Liberty 3 | Save up to 60% off new road bikes

Product: Fuji Sportif 2.5 C Road Bike - 2014

Hi all, been riding a cruiser for 6 months. I'm 350 currently from 389 and ready to upgrade bikes.

I've been looking at the gravity liberty 3 vs the fuji sportif 2.5

Being new to the sport it appears to me that the liberty 3 is a way better deal dollars wise but because of a buddy's hesitation with regards to ordering a bike online he is hesitant and feels that the components are low grade. Same buddy talked me into going endurance vs flat bar so he's not all bad right? I've tried the sportif 1.5 at performance bike because they don't cardy the 2.5 in store and would think it will be noticeable going from the 1.5 with carbon fork to 2.5 with alloy. The 1.5 also has disc brakes vs the lower grade sportif and liberty 3 I'm looking at but I was told that wheels for disc brakes are pricier and I'm afraid I'll be eating through wheels so I'm ok with having pivot.


Also, my friend says buying local you have an assembled bike and relationship for adjustments. I've watched enough videos on assembly and adjusting components that it appears doable so ordering and self assembling doesn't matter to me. Am I being short sighted on this? Ultimately any repairs to wheels are going to generally cost additional money if I buy local anyways.

Any thoughts as far as the liberty being a better bike than the 2.5 sportif? I assume either bike will require an upgrade in the wheels. I'm just looking for something more efficient and quick then a cruiser.


Please feel free to offer suggestions. I apologize if this is in the wrong forum and admin please move because I'd really like experienced opinions on this.

Last edited by Keenan; 01-01-15 at 05:17 PM. Reason: Added info for clarity.
Keenan is offline  
Old 01-04-15, 01:24 PM
  #2  
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 46
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'll make your decision easier for you. I've been looking at the Liberty 3 also, because it's an awesome deal, but it will not let you add it to your cart. After the second/third step it says it is unavailable, at least for the yellow one. So go ahead and get your sprortif, unless you get other recommendations.
evil_lies is offline  
Old 01-04-15, 04:16 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Show-Me State
Posts: 397
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
For your current situation, I'd recommend a touring bike. Bikes Direct lists the Windsor Tourist for $600:
Save Up to 60% Off Touring Bikes | Commuting | Commuter Bikes | Windsor Bikes - Tourist

You get a beefy frame, triple crankset, and 36 spoke wheels. They also have pretty laid back geometry, larger tires, and should be a lot faster than a cruiser. The components are a lot better than either bike you listed. You will likely have wheel problems with either the Gravity or Fuji bikes you listed.

I would recommend having a bike shop fit you on whatever bike you get. A poorly fit bike can make it uncomfortable to ride, and even hurt you (I messed up my knee on a do-it-yourself fit). A fit usually costs about $100. Regarding mechanical adjustments/repairs to the bike, they are really easy to do if you have basic mechanical skills, and don't mind learning by doing. But, if you aren't mechanically inclined, it is definitely a good idea to get a bike though the LBS, which will usually offer cheap or free adjustments.

If you do go the LBS route, I would still reccomend a touring bike (like a Surly Long Haul Trucker, or Novara Randonee if you have an REI near you). I really think you'll benefit from the heavy-duty wheels and hubs.
DirtRoadRunner is offline  
Old 01-04-15, 04:57 PM
  #4  
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 46
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm still new to road bike variations, but a touring bike would make a lot of sense for a clydesdale (I'm 250 and am considering them as well). A touring bike is designed to carry the weight of the rider and his/her luggage/gear. They are also supposed to be a larger frame so you can be more comfortable on it for longer periods. I would definitely look into them while you are shopping.

edit: Also, congrats on the weight loss so far! Keep up the good work!
evil_lies is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
BikingViking793
Road Cycling
3
01-30-18 10:48 AM
Keenan
Road Cycling
1
01-03-15 05:43 PM
mekanik
Hybrid Bicycles
8
09-09-13 10:02 PM
EvoFX
Touring
34
02-01-10 10:59 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.