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Women Dutch Bike

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Old 10-30-15, 03:00 PM
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Women Dutch Bike

Looking to add a motor to my Women Gazelle bike, imported from Dutchland.
It has a 3-speed SA hub.
It has 635mm tires (28" x 1-1/2).

Is it easy to convert to e-bike?
I only have a $1000 budget.

Purpose: make my 6-mile commute on flat terrain a little easier on windy days.


Last edited by mtb_addict; 10-30-15 at 03:15 PM.
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Old 10-30-15, 03:09 PM
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We put a Hill Topper on my wife's first bike a few years ago. It exceeded our expectations, she followed me up the hills like I was a bandit. We went with the Sprinter Battery which is all we every needed for the average 25 mile loop with occasional hills. Hill Topper Electric Bike Kit, Electric Bike Batteries: Electric-Bike-Kit.com
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Old 11-01-15, 08:18 AM
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Not to quibble but they don't call them girls bikes any more, They were originally designed for girls who wore dresses or skirts while riding and few women do that any more. Now they are called step through bikes and both men and women ride them, If you have a disability that keeps you from easily mounting a bike or are old folks they're a lot easier to get on and off.
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Old 11-01-15, 09:33 AM
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+1 on Hill Topper; mostly good reviews (look up Clean Republic in electricbikereview). Plus, you should be able to get a motor kit that will allow you to use your existing front rim (assuming both have the same number of spokes - probably 36). For more power look at other (ebikekit, ebike-california, ebikesca, dillenger) kits. Anything more than 250w, you should consider a torque arm (look at Grin products).

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Old 11-02-15, 09:56 AM
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Originally Posted by 2old View Post
+1 on Hill Topper; mostly good reviews (look up Clean Republic in electricbikereview). Plus, you should be able to get a motor kit that will allow you to use your existing front rim (assuming both have the same number of spokes - probably 36). For more power look at other (ebikekit, ebike-california, ebikesca, dillenger) kits. Anything more than 250w, you should consider a torque arm (look at Grin products).
How much should a LBS charge to put this motor into my front rim, assuming it has the same number of spokes?
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Old 11-02-15, 12:53 PM
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That bike depicted by the OP is a step-thru design, an Azor Oma that was sold to me in January 2015 by Rolling Orange Bikes in Brooklyn that now only does tours of the city. FWIW. Oh, and I am a 61 y.o. male who also rides a '93 RockHopper setup for the asphalt and I use it strictly for exercise. The Azor is my cruiser and grocery getter. With a Nantucket basket hung from the handlebars, it does a really great job at hauling a "sixer" of Bud sixteen ouncers back home to the abode.

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Old 11-02-15, 01:01 PM
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Expect to need new spokes since their length will differ - $1.50 each X 36 = $54 or so + $25 - $50 to build the wheel; this is about your savings (as I recall) on the kit. It would be ok to use the wheel supplied with the Hill Topper though. Wheel building (especially a front wheel) is pretty easy (look up sheldon brown), and I would probably use the New Republic wheel if I weren't going to build the wheel myself.
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Old 11-02-15, 01:22 PM
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Looked at the CR site; didn't realize that they sold spokes for $19, so that would reduce the wheel cost appreciably, although I would probably just purchase the built wheel if I didn't build it myself. Also, they increased their prices by about $100 since I last looked. Makes a Dillenger 36V kit for $699 seem like a better deal unless the range of the CR is adequate for you.
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Old 11-02-15, 03:08 PM
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Originally Posted by 2old View Post
Looked at the CR site; didn't realize that they sold spokes for $19, so that would reduce the wheel cost appreciably, although I would probably just purchase the built wheel if I didn't build it myself. Also, they increased their prices by about $100 since I last looked. Makes a Dillenger 36V kit for $699 seem like a better deal unless the range of the CR is adequate for you.
So, you are saying that their 700C wheel is okay to use as replacement to my 635mm wheel, eventhough they're not same size...?

I think my 635mm is bigger than the 700C by 2 to 3 cm.
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Old 11-02-15, 04:35 PM
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"NORMALLY", 28", 29" and 700cc are the same size. However, I've only used 29", so you might want to check with the vendor by measuring the outside diameter (OD) of your rim. The unusual aspect of bike tires is that the size refers to the OD of the tire not the rim. For instance, a 24" bike tire is about the same size as a 17" motorcycle tire. The front rim of my 29er MTB is 700cc, but uses a 29" tire.
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Old 11-02-15, 04:48 PM
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Put "bike rim sizes" into your browser and go to Sheldon Brown's site (should be first entry). Looks like 700c and 29" are the same 622mm diameter, but 635mm is a Dutch designation which is also 700b. This suggests you would need a new tire for a 700c, 29" rim and the bike would be lowered slightly in the front (you might adjust this with a "fatter" tire). Also, check that the spacing of the front hub is 100mm, although this won't be a problem since you can "adjust" steel front forks.
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Old 11-04-15, 01:35 PM
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Yeah, sheldon is the definitive source for info.

In the US, we talk about 26, 27,27.5, 28, & 29” (plus road sizes), but there are really only two road bike sizes: 99% of them are 700c wheels (from 23mm up to over 50mm (aka 29”), and the very old school 27” tires from decades ago (i.e. old Schwinn wheels from the 1970’s).
Any road bike that doesn’t have 700c wheels should be converted to them if for no other reason the ability to purchase replacement tires easily, and the wide selection (assuming they fit your bike – converting a 27” rim to a 700c is pretty easy.

Best bet – go to your local bike store and see what tires/wheels they have available for your bike – they will give you better advice than we can.
It cost me about $100 to get a wheel built into an electric hub, including parts and labor.
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Old 11-05-15, 06:47 PM
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Originally Posted by FrenchFit View Post
We put a Hill Topper on my wife's first bike a few years ago. It exceeded our expectations, she followed me up the hills like I was a bandit. We went with the Sprinter Battery which is all we every needed for the average 25 mile loop with occasional hills. Hill Topper Electric Bike Kit, Electric Bike Batteries: Electric-Bike-Kit.com
Originally Posted by 2old View Post
+1 on Hill Topper; mostly good reviews (look up Clean Republic in electricbikereview). Plus, you should be able to get a motor kit that will allow you to use your existing front rim (assuming both have the same number of spokes - probably 36). For more power look at other (ebikekit, ebike-california, ebikesca, dillenger) kits. Anything more than 250w, you should consider a torque arm (look at Grin products).
I'm not sure if the Hill Topper is strong enough. I'm 160-pounds. And the Dutchbike is 55-pounds. Plus, I carry cloths, shoes, lunch, laptop, lights...probbably 10 pounds. Motor & battery probably 20-pounds.

So, I'm looking at a total of 245-pounds (160+55+10+20).

You think the Hill Topper work?

Don't have too much hill here besides overpasses for the Interstate highway. I do 12-mile commute each day.
But sometimes, it gets windy. I hate fighting 15-mph headlight on an upright bike. Hoping electrification will make the ride more enjoyable.
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Old 11-05-15, 10:54 PM
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I'd recommend NOT getting the Hill Topper conversion kit,...and here's why:

__________________
If it wasn't for you meddling kids,...
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Old 11-05-15, 11:11 PM
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IMO, your bike isn't the best platform for conversion since it's so heavy. I didn't realize that until your last post.
Possibly a Craig's List used MTB with 26" wheels would be a better candidate.
Dillenger US and Luna Cycle, as well as many other companies, have 36/48 V, 350 - 1000w kits that would compliment a different "donor" bike (with a total outlay within your price range); this would allow you to retain the Dutch bike for pedal activity.
Pose the same question on endless sphere where there are more DIY experts.
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Old 11-06-15, 07:20 AM
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Geeze, even fully loaded, (s)he and the bike weigh less than half the people on endless sphere. Seriously.

mtb_addict, How fast do you want to go? I assume you want to supply pedal power? I'm thinking about 16mph on that bike. A tiny 350 watt Q100 front hub would work. A bigger 500-1000 watt motor would work, but would be overkill on a dutch bike.

(Sondors bike weighs more, has heavy fat tires, and does fine with 350 watts).
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Old 11-06-15, 11:07 AM
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mtb, C58 has more experience than I do and is an excellent resource. You can really trust his advice IMO.
I was trying to steer you toward a turn key unit, since that worked for me when starting out. You may want to be more DIY.
My first kit, a Dillenger 36V, 350w front system (currently $699) with mid battery pedals great and functions perfectly after one year. The second was built for a friend using a Ypedal 36V motor only kit and 36V Ping battery; built it into a fat bike it works very well. Either would be a good starting point, but there are many other avenues.
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Old 11-06-15, 01:34 PM
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Originally Posted by chas58 View Post
Geeze, even fully loaded, (s)he and the bike weigh less than half the people on endless sphere. Seriously.

mtb_addict, How fast do you want to go? I assume you want to supply pedal power? I'm thinking about 16mph on that bike. A tiny 350 watt Q100 front hub would work. A bigger 500-1000 watt motor would work, but would be overkill on a dutch bike.

(Sondors bike weighs more, has heavy fat tires, and does fine with 350 watts).
I mounted a GPS to the handlebar. So, I'm able to see how fast I normally pedal during commute.
With no wind,
  • I can cruise comfortably about 11-mph and get to work pretty fresh.
  • I can cruise at 13-mph but with alot of physical exertion and get very sweaty when I get to work.
With strong wind, I'am going 10-mph, and get pretty tired and sweaty by time I get to work.

At this point, I don't really care how fast the motor can go. I just want to get to work without feeling like all sweaty and sore and tired.

But I'm afraid after a taste of electric freedom, I'll want more. I'll start to want to go faster because it is fun. And maybe I don't even want to pedal. Lol.
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Old 11-06-15, 02:17 PM
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Just for reference; 36V, 10 ah, 350w system --- 175 pound rider; 45 pound bike; no wind; level ground; 20 mph (top speed); about 16 miles throttle only.
Decided that I wanted to go faster so currently building 30+ mph rear hub and mid drives. May decide that 20 mph was fast enough or may go bigger; who knows (I've got four kids, so getting rid of the "extras" isn't a problem)?
I'm primarily an MTB enthusiast riding off road 4 or 5 times a week and the ebike once a week, so it's a minor, but fun hobby.
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Old 11-06-15, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by 2old View Post
Just for reference; 36V, 10 ah, 350w system --- 175 pound rider; 45 pound bike; no wind; level ground; 20 mph (top speed); about 16 miles throttle only.
Decided that I wanted to go faster so currently building 30+ mph rear hub and mid drives. May decide that 20 mph was fast enough or may go bigger; who knows (I've got four kids, so getting rid of the "extras" isn't a problem)?
I'm primarily an MTB enthusiast riding off road 4 or 5 times a week and the ebike once a week, so it's a minor, but fun hobby.
Oh, it would be sweet to hit the local mtb trails with powerful electric power. There are lots of good mtb trails around here. Some with extreme technical single tracks.
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Old 11-06-15, 03:32 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
Oh, it would be sweet to hit the local mtb trails with powerful electric power. There are lots of good mtb trails around here. Some with extreme technical single tracks.
If your main use will/would be mtb tails, I would go with a mid drive setup... JMO
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Old 11-06-15, 04:05 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
I'm not sure if the Hill Topper is strong enough. I'm 160-pounds. And the Dutchbike is 55-pounds. Plus, I carry cloths, shoes, lunch, laptop, lights...probbably 10 pounds. Motor & battery probably 20-pounds.

So, I'm looking at a total of 245-pounds (160+55+10+20).

You think the Hill Topper work?

Don't have too much hill here besides overpasses for the Interstate highway. I do 12-mile commute each day.
But sometimes, it gets windy. I hate fighting 15-mph headlight on an upright bike. Hoping electrification will make the ride more enjoyable.
It's a non-issue. Yes, at that weight acceleration might be slower but unless you are tackling 10% grades or drag racing I'd bet the weight you are talking about is immaterial. Fully loaded I'd guess my wife's bike was 220 or so. Remember, you are talking about mixing pedaling watts with a significant electric boost or pulse, it doesn't take all that much to boost the effective power at the rubber by 30% or so. If you are talking about turning it and leaving it to pull the bike f/t without any effort on the riders part - then this isn't the solution for you.

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Old 11-06-15, 04:12 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
Oh, it would be sweet to hit the local mtb trails with powerful electric power. There are lots of good mtb trails around here. Some with extreme technical single tracks.
Around here that has been illegal - same as taking a motorcycle on hiking trails. I think that is changing, a low power electric assist is being classified differently, I am not up on the latest developments but my thinking is a low power assist is no longer considered to be any different than riding a MTB on controlled trails.
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Old 11-07-15, 02:21 PM
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Theres this whole thing to crowd Fund.
Originally Posted by linberl View Post


For those of you who did not get the email:

ShareRoller V3 launching Oct 20th on Indiegogo





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Hello ShareRoller Community:

Finally, the time has come - ShareRoller will be launching the new V3 on Indiegogo this upcoming Tuesday, October 20th.


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Now onto the exciting stuff: First, here is a sneak Preview of the New V3 ShareRoller:






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Since it sits over the front wheel and has a drum that turns the tire its just a Matter of mounting it

Id make it removable to not get stolen when you lock up the Bike If I were You.
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Old 11-07-15, 02:35 PM
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I just converted my commuter. As in I finished it about two hours ago. I used this kit from GBK. When I started the bike, with lights rack, and other commuting accessories, but not the panniers, weighed 40.5 Pounds. When I finished it weighed 51 pounds.

Here is the "after" picture:



Here are some comments I made over at Endless Sphere.

Desired max speed on level ground. 17-20mph
Desired max range at what cruising speed. Ok, my desire is for infinite; forgoing that, 10mi @ 20mph, 20mi @ 17mph. Yes, I would like more, that is a minimum
Preferred bike wheel size, or wheel size of bike you want to convert. 700c (at some point I want to switch to 650. The bike is too big for me; but that will be later)
Brake type of motor wheel. Front Disc. (In the near future I want to switch to hydraulic discs; but they are mechanical right now.)
Rider weight. 210Lb (I got rid of my car over 8 years ago and have used a bicycle as primary transportation since then. I don't expect this to change much)
Terrain. Exp: mostly flat (this is Kansas)

I want a geared front hub for lighter weight and ease of pedaling.

If there is a chance of mid drive working with this bike I am interested; otherwise, front hub. I like the belt drive and NuVinci. I know that if I go with the mid drive I would also need a part to put the front pulley on it from california e-bikes. However, I suspect that it is not compatible with the Eccentric Bottom bracket.

My primary concern is to take the edge off while riding on windy days. I want to keep this below about $1000. I am, sort of, looking at this kit:36v250w front ebike kit with 36V Samsung frame battery and built-in sine wave controller set-Greenbikekit.com online store for electric bicycle components-GreenBikeKit.com and this one https://bmsbattery.com/ebike-kit/576...ebike-kit.html.

I really don't see much difference between them. As I see it, I will also need:
A torque arm (they seem to have that on their site)
A spacer for the disc (where should I get that?)
The in-line brake switches (they seem to have that on their site)
Anything else?

Here is what I have. Due to space concerns, I don't want to get another bike. I have a trike in the basement that I barely use because it is such an ordeal to get out. know I am going to lose the dyno-hub. That is no great loss; I am not very impressed by it anyways.


. . . Well, I got around to installing it today. It took about two hours (I don't work particularly fast). I ended up putting my old brake levers back on.

I realize that not having the interlock is a safety issue. My e-scooters in China all had them. At the same time, the brake levers with the kit were not pulling enough to give me good braking action.

Other than that I seem to have had no trouble holding 15-17 on assist level 3.

The front wheel is not perfectly centered; as in there seems to be a bit of offset, I can adjust that later; however, it was a bit of a fight to get the fenders to clear (yes, full fenders, this is a commuter, not a sport-bike). I am not pleased about stuffing all the connectors in small space in the bottom of the bottle bracket. I can also see myself getting a couple of voltage droppers in order to run the lights; but that is a project for later.

On another note, the bike (rigged for commuting; but no saddlebags) weighed 40.5 before, and 51 pounds after.
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