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Automatic gear changing for Shimano E7000

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Automatic gear changing for Shimano E7000

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Old 04-17-19, 04:56 AM
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drmaestro
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Automatic gear changing for Shimano E7000

Hi,

I've recently bought a Shimano E7000 e-bike system which has a Shimano Deore M600 rear derailleur (10 speed). My previous bike was bought 15 years ago and was a normal mountain bike, so I wasn't really following the technology, but it seems that we can have automatic gear shifting now. I have a few questions though:

1) Would the automatic gear shifting be helpful while climbing hills? My actual problem right now is to find the ideal way to use the gears and also the bike modes (eco/trail/boost) simultaneously to be able to climb hills comfortably. If I start climbing in boost mode, the pedals turn too fast in the beginning, which becomes tiring after a while. If I start on a harder gear, the beginning is comfortable but after a while I have to shift the gears, which decreases my momentum and I get tired again (of course these are all for long hills, short ones are not a problem). Would an automatic gear shift be able to find the ideal cadence for me? Someone mentioned that automatic shifters could not change gears while climbing, so they were only useful in flat roads, where you can pedal steadily. If that's the case, then the usefulness be limited in my situation.

2) What is the easiest way (which requires the least amount of modification) to convert my bike to an automatic gear shifting bike? The manual mentions DI2 shifting compatibility but I haven't been able to find an exact list of components required.

3) If the problem in my first question (climbing hills easily) cannot be solevd by an automatic gear shifter, which technique should I use to maximize my efficiency while climbing?

Thanks...
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Old 04-17-19, 08:46 AM
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2old
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IMO, you should try to solve your dilemma without the "automatic" first. I suggest you start climbing in a comfortable gear with low assist, then increase the assist when the hill gets harder. You might need to begin with "a little too easy gear", but shouldn't need to shift again. As you get stronger and more exposure to your system, it'll become intuitive.
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Old 04-17-19, 04:09 PM
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Doc_Wui
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I agree with 2Old. Might be better to start in the eco or trail mode and in a gear that makes it easy to pedal. You can probably sustain that all the way as you get stronger.

These are bikes after all, and are more efficient when operated by the rider. In the old days would you have subjected yourself to the wrong gear when climbing a hill? You could injure your legs. SImilarly, it's the same issue for the motor. It's very strong but you still want to make it easier for the motor.
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Old 04-17-19, 07:28 PM
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Nightdiver
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These integrated mid-drive systems are intended to be ridden as bikes first and foremost and will reward you for treating it like any other bike. So for riding hilly terrain, either set and forget your assist level and then use the bike's gearing normally, or if you find yourself in the middle of a long climb and want a little extra help, then just toggle up the assist level. Honestly, the auto shifting systems have their own frustrations and are not necessarily a solution to what you're describing.
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Old 04-18-19, 03:25 AM
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Thank you very much for all the suggestions. I should probably learn better how to use an ebike with gears. So which one is a better strategy: Start on eco mode with a too easy gear and increase the support level without changing gears or start on trail on a mid level gear, then go to an easier gear and then go to boost, or start on boost on mid/hard gear then decrease gear while climbing? My experience with the last choice makes me think it isn't the best one, as you probably loose some momentum while trying to change gears and there is no support left from the motor, so you probably can go fast this way but cannot sustain for a long period. The first option is probably the best one, but also slowest one.

And also, what is the real purpose of automatic gears? The regular derailleurs are very efficient in changing gears now (it was a lot problematic 30 years ago), so why would anyone need automatic if it doesn't help you choose the right gear to make you feel comfortable by maintaining a stable cadence independent of the gradient? The only real benefit I would expect from them would be while going uphill, as going on a flat road or downhill isn't a serious problem for gears.

Last edited by drmaestro; 04-18-19 at 03:32 AM.
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