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Range Examples

Old 06-04-20, 08:16 AM
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danh123
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Range Examples

What does everybody get for range on their ebikes? Maybe list what motor, battery size(wh), what kind of terrain you ride, and any other details that may affect range.
I see numbers and estimates all over the place and would be great to see real world examples.
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Old 06-05-20, 02:53 PM
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On a recent ride, I took my Pinarello Dyodo for fifty miles and still had a lot of juice left in the battery when done, (extended/auxiliary battery was drained, primary frame-mounted battery still with over 50%). Set to the middle assist setting, (of three available), the whole way. With about ten miles to go, I went ahead and bumped it up to the maximum assist setting. Route was flat, no stops, (off-road paved bikepath/trail).

I'm pretty sure if I were to ride on the lowest assist setting, and on flat terrain, that I could easily get in a metric century. Will try a bit later this summer.

(I do not know the battery capacity, but could be easily found on the manufacturer website. Motor is hub-based ebikemotion. I myself am 220 pounds.)

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Old 06-05-20, 09:09 PM
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My Trike: 36V 500W geared hub motor.
Mostly flat paved trails and roads. Trike weighs 49 lbs, I weigh 177 lbs.
With 8AH 12S pack: Maximum speed 28MPH 10miles@22mph. 20miles@15MPH.
With 18AH 10S pack: Maximum speed 22MPH. 45miles@15MPH.
I do not ride with assist. 100% e-powered for all examples.
When I ride without e-power I ditch the Trike and ride a road-bike. Range 60miles@17MPH.
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Old 06-06-20, 09:29 AM
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Range depends on so many factors (rider weight, wind, gearing, terrain, PAS levels or throttle use) that it is pretty useless to look at what other riders do unless you get that info as well. Safe number is 20 w/h per mile. If you get more that's great. That way, you're comparing the same thing - w/h and not variables.
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Old 06-06-20, 10:13 AM
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danh123
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Originally Posted by volosong View Post
On a recent ride, I took my Pinarello Dyodo for fifty miles and still had a lot of juice left in the battery when done, (extended/auxiliary battery was drained, primary frame-mounted battery still with over 50%). Set to the middle assist setting, (of three available), the whole way. With about ten miles to go, I went ahead and bumped it up to the maximum assist setting. Route was flat, no stops, (off-road paved bikepath/trail).

I'm pretty sure if I were to ride on the lowest assist setting, and on flat terrain, that I could easily get in a metric century. Will try a bit later this summer.

(I do not know the battery capacity, but could be easily found on the manufacturer website. Motor is hub-based ebikemotion. I myself am 220 pounds.)
That's pretty good range! I am thinking about getting an orbea gain which is similar to your bike. At level 2 assist, how much of an assist did it give? Is that the level you usually ride in?

Have you gone up any big hills? How does it handle them?

Overall how do you like the bike??
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Old 06-06-20, 10:16 AM
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Originally Posted by linberl View Post
Range depends on so many factors (rider weight, wind, gearing, terrain, PAS levels or throttle use) that it is pretty useless to look at what other riders do unless you get that info as well. Safe number is 20 w/h per mile. If you get more that's great. That way, you're comparing the same thing - w/h and not variables.
Yes, it would definitely be more accurate with all of that info, and if people include it, that would paint a better picture. I am just trying to get a general idea for now as I am new to this.

I have heard that 20 w/h per mile rule and I have been using that when estimating mileage but it appears some bikes do much better. For example, the orbea gain and the pinarello ebikes that use the ebikmotion motor have small batteries but I see people getting big ranges.
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Old 06-06-20, 10:56 AM
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Originally Posted by danh123 View Post
Yes, it would definitely be more accurate with all of that info, and if people include it, that would paint a better picture. I am just trying to get a general idea for now as I am new to this.

I have heard that 20 w/h per mile rule and I have been using that when estimating mileage but it appears some bikes do much better. For example, the orbea gain and the pinarello ebikes that use the ebikmotion motor have small batteries but I see people getting big ranges.
I've got a tiny 130w motor and I get 30-35 miles on it - but that's because I'm light, the bike is light, I use lowest level PAS, and I pause PAS when I don't need it. So that range means nothing in the big scheme of things. If you don't want to end up pedaling what is probably a heavy e-bike without juice, just stick with the 20w/h rule. If I run out, it's no biggie (bike+ebike system is still only 23 lbs). But if you've got a 40-60lb e-bike, it won't be fun. The folks with "big ranges" might be doing a lot of coasting, or not using the motor on flats, avoiding hills, etc. The specs the manufacturer gives are always too generous so don't go by those. I've found the 20 w/h is great for giving you a minimum range you will get.
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Old 06-06-20, 11:26 AM
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Originally Posted by danh123 View Post
That's pretty good range! I am thinking about getting an orbea gain which is similar to your bike. At level 2 assist, how much of an assist did it give? Is that the level you usually ride in?

Have you gone up any big hills? How does it handle them?

Overall how do you like the bike??
I've heard good things about the Orbea. I'm just a Pinarello fanboy and have four other Pinarellos in my stable, (KOBH, FCX, FP6, FP Team). I've only had two real rides with the Dyodo, so can't really say about the assist settings. On the first ride, I tried all three. The lowest helps. The highest gives a good kick. The middle was a good compromise between assist and battery drain.

With my regular bikes, I used to average 15 mph on a ride of any length. Maybe faster on shorter rides, maybe slower on much longer rides. This ride I commented on in post #2 was sort of a test run to see just how far I could go with the assist. The route was planned to be flat, on a bike path, no stops, and it turned out to be a day without much wind. Ended up riding farther than I had planned. Went so far, still had a lot of juice and felt good, so went for the next mileage milestone. I do find that the assist makes me pedal harder to maintain that 20 mph speed. It's a blast going that fast, and solo, not part of a peloton. I'm also finding that riding that fast, one creates their own wind. Going 20 mph feels like you are constantly going into a wind, but it is a wind that you are creating yourself.

The middle setting is enough of an assist to allow me to maintain 20 mph without an overwhelming intense effort. Just a middling effort and 20 mph is easy. I can see that the highest assist would be used when I'm tired, or when I really am going into a headwind. The lowest setting I don't find much use for...yet. I'm still experimenting and learning the system.

No big hills yet. I'm saving them for later this summer when I've shaken off the winter inactivity. Being big, I'm not much of a climber anyway. Going up any hill of note at 5 mph is normal for me. The one hill I did climb, I found that I could take it at close to 10 mph. But can't say if that is because I'm in a bit better shape, the hill was not very steep, or the electric assist was helping that much. As I said, still experimenting and learning the bike.

How do I like it? Well, it's a Pinarello and rides like one. Stable while being responsive. Handles like my other Pinarellos, but feels heavy, (which it is - 27.5 pounds advertised). Once you're moving, it feels like a normal Pinarello, especially with the assist. Without assist, it feels like a heavy bike.

Hope this info helps. As I ride more, I'll get a better feel for the bikes characteristics. Been raining lately, so no riding.
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Old 06-06-20, 01:35 PM
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Originally Posted by volosong View Post
I've heard good things about the Orbea. I'm just a Pinarello fanboy and have four other Pinarellos in my stable, (KOBH, FCX, FP6, FP Team). I've only had two real rides with the Dyodo, so can't really say about the assist settings. On the first ride, I tried all three. The lowest helps. The highest gives a good kick. The middle was a good compromise between assist and battery drain.

With my regular bikes, I used to average 15 mph on a ride of any length. Maybe faster on shorter rides, maybe slower on much longer rides. This ride I commented on in post #2 was sort of a test run to see just how far I could go with the assist. The route was planned to be flat, on a bike path, no stops, and it turned out to be a day without much wind. Ended up riding farther than I had planned. Went so far, still had a lot of juice and felt good, so went for the next mileage milestone. I do find that the assist makes me pedal harder to maintain that 20 mph speed. It's a blast going that fast, and solo, not part of a peloton. I'm also finding that riding that fast, one creates their own wind. Going 20 mph feels like you are constantly going into a wind, but it is a wind that you are creating yourself.

The middle setting is enough of an assist to allow me to maintain 20 mph without an overwhelming intense effort. Just a middling effort and 20 mph is easy. I can see that the highest assist would be used when I'm tired, or when I really am going into a headwind. The lowest setting I don't find much use for...yet. I'm still experimenting and learning the system.

No big hills yet. I'm saving them for later this summer when I've shaken off the winter inactivity. Being big, I'm not much of a climber anyway. Going up any hill of note at 5 mph is normal for me. The one hill I did climb, I found that I could take it at close to 10 mph. But can't say if that is because I'm in a bit better shape, the hill was not very steep, or the electric assist was helping that much. As I said, still experimenting and learning the bike.

How do I like it? Well, it's a Pinarello and rides like one. Stable while being responsive. Handles like my other Pinarellos, but feels heavy, (which it is - 27.5 pounds advertised). Once you're moving, it feels like a normal Pinarello, especially with the assist. Without assist, it feels like a heavy bike.

Hope this info helps. As I ride more, I'll get a better feel for the bikes characteristics. Been raining lately, so no riding.
Very helpful, thanks. Would love to hear more after you do more rides!
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Old 06-28-20, 09:28 AM
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Did another 50 miler yesterday. Different bike path, (North Idaho Centennial Trail). I used all four assist modes. No assist when riding through the beach area. Had to go very slow due to all the people milling about, kids and dogs. The low assist mode is pretty worthless and I only used that on very flat stretches. As previous, the middle assist mode was the most useful, being a good compromise between power drain and amount of assist. Did use the turbo mode when going up a couple of hills and a few miles when headed into a stiff wind.

I wanted to try and drain the batteries completely, so after about forty miles, I kept it in the turbo mode. The auxiliary battery drained at about mile 35. When done with the 50 miles, still had somewhere around 50% juice in the primary, internal frame battery.

The motor assist is supposed to kick off at 20 mph, but I'm wondering if mine is good up to about 22 mph. Seems like it. On the hill climbs, I was able to ride about twice to three times the speed that I climb on one of my "analog" bikes. I'm big at 6'3" and 220 pounds, just a few weeks shy of age 69. I'm not a climber. Normally, I'll climb at 5 or 6 mph. With the turbo assist mode, I was able to climb at 13-15 mph. That was cool! The hills were crested a lot quicker and that felt good. Wasn't the normal chore.

On the times I used no assist, it just felt like a heavy bike. Couldn't go very fast anyway, due to the congestion. It worked well enough. Bike is balanced, so going slow felt fine. Using turbo mode into the stiff headwind from about mile 35 to 42 was really appreciated. Didn't really push it then and only averaged about 17-18 mph. No need to go faster. Was really looking forward to the return ride tail wind.

One thought occurred to me near the end of the ride. Riding this pedal-assist bike made me feel 35-45 years younger. In my youth, when I needed a burst of power to crest a hill or whatever, I'd stomp on the pedals and get that instant surge of power. Of course, you lose that as you age. Yesterday, it felt the same as then. When I wanted a boost, I'd stomp on the pedals again, and zoom! Off and away.

Best part of yesterday's 50-miler . . . after coming home, I wasn't totally wiped out as I would have been last year or the year before. I had enough energy and lack of weariness that I was able to take the dogs for a several-mile walk. And had enough energy to watch the New Zealand rugby match. That was awesome, (not being physically drained, that is, the rugby match which was a stinker). It was nice not being worthless for the rest of the day after a longish ride.

Last edited by volosong; 06-28-20 at 09:32 AM.
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Old 06-28-20, 08:37 PM
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Originally Posted by volosong View Post
Did another 50 miler yesterday. Different bike path, (North Idaho Centennial Trail). I used all four assist modes. No assist when riding through the beach area. Had to go very slow due to all the people milling about, kids and dogs. The low assist mode is pretty worthless and I only used that on very flat stretches. As previous, the middle assist mode was the most useful, being a good compromise between power drain and amount of assist. Did use the turbo mode when going up a couple of hills and a few miles when headed into a stiff wind.

I wanted to try and drain the batteries completely, so after about forty miles, I kept it in the turbo mode. The auxiliary battery drained at about mile 35. When done with the 50 miles, still had somewhere around 50% juice in the primary, internal frame battery.

The motor assist is supposed to kick off at 20 mph, but I'm wondering if mine is good up to about 22 mph. Seems like it. On the hill climbs, I was able to ride about twice to three times the speed that I climb on one of my "analog" bikes. I'm big at 6'3" and 220 pounds, just a few weeks shy of age 69. I'm not a climber. Normally, I'll climb at 5 or 6 mph. With the turbo assist mode, I was able to climb at 13-15 mph. That was cool! The hills were crested a lot quicker and that felt good. Wasn't the normal chore.

On the times I used no assist, it just felt like a heavy bike. Couldn't go very fast anyway, due to the congestion. It worked well enough. Bike is balanced, so going slow felt fine. Using turbo mode into the stiff headwind from about mile 35 to 42 was really appreciated. Didn't really push it then and only averaged about 17-18 mph. No need to go faster. Was really looking forward to the return ride tail wind.

One thought occurred to me near the end of the ride. Riding this pedal-assist bike made me feel 35-45 years younger. In my youth, when I needed a burst of power to crest a hill or whatever, I'd stomp on the pedals and get that instant surge of power. Of course, you lose that as you age. Yesterday, it felt the same as then. When I wanted a boost, I'd stomp on the pedals again, and zoom! Off and away.

Best part of yesterday's 50-miler . . . after coming home, I wasn't totally wiped out as I would have been last year or the year before. I had enough energy and lack of weariness that I was able to take the dogs for a several-mile walk. And had enough energy to watch the New Zealand rugby match. That was awesome, (not being physically drained, that is, the rugby match which was a stinker). It was nice not being worthless for the rest of the day after a longish ride.
Sounds great, especially for the hills. Also nice not to be so worn out so you can out sooner for the next ride. I am only 38 but live in a hilly area. Usually average just over 12mph on rides. Hoping with the Ebike it will boost the mpha lot by helping with the hills and can go out for longer rides in less time.

I ended up ordering the orbea gain. It is all set up and ready to ride but I broke my foot playing tennis so it is going to be a few more weeks 😭
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Old 06-29-20, 05:45 AM
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I only have a single battery on a 52 LB bike. Bosch drive, 190 LB rider and using highest settings as I'm still wearing the new off the bike and only getting 37 miles to shut down. Mixed hills and variable winds that day. Still haven't totally got away from the chain dropping problem. So not as much fun. Be Well, Bluesfrog.
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Old 07-04-20, 06:20 PM
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I have a Copenhagen wheel on a Specialized hybrid bike. Copenhagen Wheel is set to class 1 initially but can be augmented to a limit of 24 or 25 MPH, which I have done. When it was set at 20 MPH I could get nearly 50 miles on a charge using mostly the Eco mode (it has 3 modes). Now it seems the limit is more like 40-ish. Its pretty strong even in Eco mode so thats what I use most and its pretty flat around here.
PS- I love the Copenhagen wheel, I know not everyone has had stellar experiences but its pure fun!
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