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-   -   Am I making a mistake with getting a mid-step radmission? (https://www.bikeforums.net/electric-bikes/1228220-am-i-making-mistake-getting-mid-step-radmission.html)

Birdbikes 04-14-21 02:44 AM

Am I making a mistake with getting a mid-step radmission?
 
I'm about 5'10 without shoes with an inseam around 34.5 inches with shoes on. I have a wingspan of 68.5 inches, so long legs and short arms.

after a lot of research, i've pretty much decided that the mid-step radmission is better for me due to my longer legs and little bit shorter arms. I know nothing about bikes though, so part of me is still feeling like its a mistake to get the mid-step, and that it will be too cramped. I am at the max recommended inseam for the mid-step version too.

I have no way of testing it out before I buy it either.


Am I making a mistake by going with the mid-step? Does anyone have similar measurements for your proportions and ride the mid-step? Everything I read says i'd be better with more of a medium frame and not a large, but I just worry it will feel too small and i will regret not getting the bigger one.


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alloo 04-14-21 06:06 AM

Get the bike try it out if it doesn't work return the bike. That's the method to D2C bikes. Keep all the packaging. If it works keep the bike. Good luck.

cat0020 04-14-21 06:18 AM

What kind of riding do you plan on doing on this Radmission?
What kind of bike are you used to riding?
What are the measurements on the bike that you are used to riding?
What is the reach, what is the standover height? what is the geometry of the bike that you are used to riding?

2old 04-14-21 09:34 AM

It's possible to adjust the cockpit of a bike with a different stem, bars and/or seatpost if it's necessary. Alternately, go to a bike shop and find a similarly sized pedal bike and try it out (or possibly a used bike on Craigslist etc). Sounds like you might be in analysis paralysis.

Doc_Wui 04-14-21 11:15 PM

If you gave me one, I would probably crush the Rad Mission after scavenging all the useful pieces. Why? It's only one speed. They are catering to uneducated customers or clueless hipsters.

cat0020 04-15-21 06:29 AM

Maybe that's why nobody is giving you a Rad Mission?

Single speed e-bike may not suit your purpose, but plenty of other people can use it without the complication of shifting gears while cycling.
Calling people who might need a single speed e-bike "uneducated customers or clueless hipsters" is the same type of mentality that drive people from bike shop employees that think every customer is buying a $5k bike when they walk through the door.

Leisesturm 04-15-21 10:24 AM

Given the o.p.'s dimensions the choice between mid-step or high step come down to functionality. Women that wear dresses or skirts find mid-step (or stagger, or mixte) designs easier to use than high step designs. Most will have ample inseam to straddle a 'mans frame' but culturally will be biased to the mid-step. I personally choose the 'large' frame of a S,M,L size offering. I compensate for the added 'reach' of the larger frame with a shorter stem. It is absolutely the o.p.'s choice which to try.

Leisesturm 04-15-21 10:32 AM


Originally Posted by cat0020 (Post 22015691)
Maybe that's why nobody is giving you a Rad Mission?

Single speed e-bike may not suit your purpose, but plenty of other people can use it without the complication of shifting gears while cycling.
Calling people who might need a single speed e-bike "uneducated customers or clueless hipsters" is the same type of mentality that drive people from bike shop employees that think every customer is buying a $5k bike when they walk through the door.

I'm with the other poster. Anyone who can't handle the complication of shifting gears should walk. Look at the carnage on America's roads and tell me that automatic transmissions were a good idea. 1x8-12 is bad enough. I was already going 'wut?' when manufacturers started social engineering us into accepting 20% less gear range as a good thing. There have always been SSFG adherents. A niche community that have their eyes open as to what is what. This bike is being sold to ... normal people who haven't a clue. Even without a proper drivetrain that bike 'should' cost twice what it does. I have no idea how they sell it so cheap but the saying holds "if it sounds too good to be true ..."

2old 04-15-21 03:22 PM

Not to argue, but speaking as one who rode a single speed mountain bike off road in nasty terrain for 20 years before age took it's toll and I resorted to gears, the SS e-bike would make sense (to me) unless the terrain was hilly. The important aspect is being able to maintain half of the bike's top speed when ascending in order to avoid a significant portion of the battery's output being absorbed as heat by the motor.

speedy25 04-20-21 12:17 AM

If you dont mind replacing main harnesses, displays and controllers, then by all means get a rad!

Just my experience making repairs when they quit.

-SP

Calsun 04-21-21 08:35 PM

It comes down to comfort level and how you plan to use the bike. A standard frame can be difficult to manage when making a quick stop and having to straddel the top tube of the frame and more of a concern for men than for women. In a city where one may have someone all of a sudden come in front of you, a step through is helpful. Same goes for putting anything on the rear of the bike like a rack with some groceries or other items. Tough to get the leg all the way over the rear to dismount quickly. If you plan on wearing long pants and conventional shoes than a step through is easier to manage as compared to someone in shorts and or bicycling shoes.

Step through frames are heavier and so with non motorized bikes, the standard triangle frame has been more popular. The first really popular trail motorbike was the Honda Trail 90 introduced in 1964 and it had a step through frame. With e-bikes we are going back to the small ICE trail bikes of this era.

FREEBIRD1 04-29-21 04:13 PM

I had a RAD Mini, it functioned fine, electronics worker flawlessly. I used it to get me back in shape for a few months and my friend still has it. The Mission looks like a nice bike, the mid step may be more convenient for getting on/off easier.

Calsun 05-06-21 02:53 PM


Originally Posted by Doc_Wui (Post 22015489)
If you gave me one, I would probably crush the Rad Mission after scavenging all the useful pieces. Why? It's only one speed. They are catering to uneducated customers or clueless hipsters.

Or people who live in towns where there are few hills. Much like the 2WD pickups and cars that are sold to people who will never leave the pavement and never encounter snow and so have no need for 4WD or even AWD. I have come across many posts by people who bought an e-bike and have not had a bicycle of any type for more than 30 years and now are having trouble with adjusting the derailleurs on their new very heavy bikes.

YankeeRider 05-11-21 06:34 AM

Aventon Pace 500
 

Originally Posted by Birdbikes (Post 22013891)
I'm about 5'10 without shoes with an inseam around 34.5 inches with shoes on. I have a wingspan of 68.5 inches, so long legs and short arms.

after a lot of research, i've pretty much decided that the mid-step radmission is better for me due to my longer legs and little bit shorter arms. I know nothing about bikes though, so part of me is still feeling like its a mistake to get the mid-step, and that it will be too cramped. I am at the max recommended inseam for the mid-step version too.

I have no way of testing it out before I buy it either.


Am I making a mistake by going with the mid-step? Does anyone have similar measurements for your proportions and ride the mid-step? Everything I read says i'd be better with more of a medium frame and not a large, but I just worry it will feel too small and i will regret not getting the bigger one.


​​​​​
​​

As others have mentioned, the single-speed gearing on the Radmission may be limiting, unless you're in pretty decent shape and riding on level roads. Of course, it's hard to beat the Radmission's price. Another bike that you might want to look at would be the Aventon Pace 500, which comes in step-over and step-through designs and the frames come in sizes. And, they do have some dealers - Aventon has a mixed direct to consumer and dealer sales model. It does cost somewhat more, but is still a value bike from a well-known company, and it comes with an 8-speed Shimano Altus drivetrain and upgraded hydraulic disk brakes. I think this bike is well worth the extra cash, and if you live near a dealer, you can try before you buy.
https://www.aventon.com/products/ave...-complete-bike

senatorsca 05-11-21 07:54 PM

I would definitely consider a DIY bike, then you get the best of all worlds (quality frame, components and more performance from the electrical system). You could probably find a nice used mid-range touring/hybrid bike and do a conversion! :)

FREEBIRD1 05-17-21 05:13 PM

I really like mine, does what they say it will, simple operation and for a bike with no suspension the tires give a pretty good ride. The single speed doesn't bother me at all, with the assist, it climbs all the hills I ride. On the flats it will happily breeze along at 18-20 mph. The thing is built pretty stout, welds were good etc. The red color is almost a day glow dark orange (the pics don't really capture the tone) and is very visible far off. I had their Mini 4 and it functioned great, but to me it was more of a scooter/moped and was a lot heavier to move around, my friend still has it with a lot of miles racked on it. For $1100 IMO this is a nice e-bike,
https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...347e0fa101.jpg


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