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Trek Verve+ 2 Hybrid E-Bike

Old 07-25-21, 07:31 PM
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Trek Verve+ 2 Hybrid E-Bike

Just placed an order for one of these.

The rack and fenders were a priority for me along with wider/thicker tires, so some sort of hybrid proved to be most suitable.


Looking here at the geometry for thr XL size:

1. Bottom bracket height of 305mm seems unnecessarily high to me. Whats the point?

2. The head tube angle is very slack. A trail of 9.5 seems quite high for a bike designed for pavement. My priority for this bike was something comfortable so I dont care, but how would you guys expect something like this to handle.? Slow and comfortable?

the bike comes with 700x45 tires, another plus for me. But does anyone think that the overall tire diameter is unnecessarily large? Usually i am against trying out different diameter wheels, but would a 650b wheelset positively impact the trail and lower the bottom bracket down to a more reasonable height as per intended use?

What do you think of the adjustable quill stem? Would you switch it out for something fixed for better rigidity?

If I wanted to install my spare 190mm crank arms and bottom bracket onto this bike (Bosch Active Line motor,) would it be possible? Assuming I can get a good chainline

Lastly, 460mm ATC for the fork... I guess its to account for the massive diameter tires. Will it work fine for pavement use? If i hypothetically installed a shorter length fork onto this bike to steepen the angles a little and lower the bottom bracket, would it handle well?

The proposed changes are not something im looking to do, as I would not have bothered to buy such a bike if I was this concerned about handling. I am mainly concerned about commuting comfort.

If anyone is interested and would like to read a review once I test out the bike, let me know!

Thanks!
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Old 07-25-21, 10:12 PM
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Seems like a great bike and I'm a big fan of Trek anyway. Try it out before deciding on any alterations. Shouldn't need to worry about tire size with the motor, and I'm sure Trek has the system dialed. Doubt the adjustable stem will be a problem, but I don't like them. Easy to change.
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Old 07-26-21, 07:21 AM
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Originally Posted by 2old View Post
Seems like a great bike and I'm a big fan of Trek anyway. Try it out before deciding on any alterations. Shouldn't need to worry about tire size with the motor, and I'm sure Trek has the system dialed. Doubt the adjustable stem will be a problem, but I don't like them. Easy to change.
I agree. But 302mm for the bottom bracket height is typical for a mountain bike! It's very high for a simple commuter, especially one which uses 170mm crank arms.. on an XL frame. Totally not necessary.

On my FX 7.3, the bb height is about ~285mm and I've only had a few minor scrapes here and there with the end of my 190mm crank arms during the odd tight turn. That would would be a totally sufficient height for an XL hybrid bike assuming you need the clearance for those long arms.

Adjustable stem can be useful. Don't think it would be a problem unless we're talking about a more spirited bike. I'll be fine with the more upright riding position because I got a fairly aggressive handlebar to saddle drop going on with my trek fx.
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Old 07-26-21, 07:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
I agree. But 302mm for the bottom bracket height is typical for a mountain bike! It's very high for a simple commuter, especially one which uses 170mm crank arms.. on an XL frame. Totally not necessary.

On my FX 7.3, the bb height is about ~285mm and I've only had a few minor scrapes here and there with the end of my 190mm crank arms during the odd tight turn. That would would be a totally sufficient height for an XL hybrid bike assuming you need the clearance for those long arms.

Adjustable stem can be useful. Don't think it would be a problem unless we're talking about a more spirited bike. I'll be fine with the more upright riding position because I got a fairly aggressive handlebar to saddle drop going on with my trek fx.
You asked. I didn't say there was anything bad about adjustable stems, just that I don't like them. I've always been able to find the perfect stem for me. They might be great on a bike that had multiple users.
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Old 08-01-21, 03:13 AM
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My wife has a Verve 2+. The tires dragged on the fenders, and since we stay on the road, I replaced them with Schwalbe Marathon Supremes in a 42. You would prob want their Marathon Plus 440 or 492. I have been trying to get the 492s for a year.

I put a Thudbuster on it, she loves it.

What is your leg length? If you're all leg, and you actually need a 190, you'll be glad it has a high bottom bracket. You prob don't want more than a 180. Spin, don't mash..

Her bike doesn't have mtb style forks up front. I'm not a fan of cheap forks like that. If you decide to swap forks, see if the older model fork will fit. If you want shock absorbtion, get a suspension stem. I have a Redshift on my bike, it's ok. That also saves a little weight.
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Old 08-01-21, 02:41 PM
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Originally Posted by late View Post
My wife has a Verve 2+. The tires dragged on the fenders, and since we stay on the road, I replaced them with Schwalbe Marathon Supremes in a 42. You would prob want their Marathon Plus 440 or 492. I have been trying to get the 492s for a year.

I put a Thudbuster on it, she loves it.

What is your leg length? If you're all leg, and you actually need a 190, you'll be glad it has a high bottom bracket. You prob don't want more than a 180. Spin, don't mash..

Her bike doesn't have mtb style forks up front. I'm not a fan of cheap forks like that. If you decide to swap forks, see if the older model fork will fit. If you want shock absorbtion, get a suspension stem. I have a Redshift on my bike, it's ok. That also saves a little weight.
You can adjust the fenders to fit up to 700 x 50c.. depends on how they were installed.


I actually picked up the bike yesterday the motor assist is extremely smart and intuitive. Very good handling bike and a beautifully smooth high quality ride. Good handling, just not very fast turn in because of the slack head tube angle, but push around turns fluidly and the handling is very good. Its a stable ride.

My inseam is 87.5cm . 190mm is slightly too long, but better than way too short. It was all I could find. I would like 185 or 187.5mm ..

I tend to ride with a mix between mash and spin. E bikes use their own bottom brackets and cranks, so doubt its worth the trouble of switching it out.

Rigid forks greatly improve the responsiveness and agility of the bike on reasonably smooth surfaces. They can still handle rougher terrain with a good rider. Even a suspension fork with lock out functionality will never perform nearly as well unless your entire commute is one horrific road surface condition.

For the roads here in Toronto, I would honestly prefer suspension. But most of the pavement in the suburbs where I live are smooth enough to really get the most of a rigid fork.

I would maybe consider getting a rigid fork with a shorter ATC (and convert the headset to threadless and try some new stems) .

Other than that, the only other serious mod idea i have is to try a 650b wheelset.
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Old 08-01-21, 09:03 PM
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I would wonder if Drippy actually bought one of these but if one does buy a Bosch equipped bike be aware changing tire sizes can have an effect on the ride and how the motor assists. The Firmware is set by Trek for that bike and wheel size and other things. You cannot change to different gear systems easily and sometimes at all according to Bosch and (mainly their lawyers I am sure) and if you do try to change it gets messy.

That all being said you can upgrade things and have a good time. Drive Units, no. Displays, yes but you need a shop for that. Batteries potentially like a 500wh Powerpack in replace of a 400wh Powerpack but again you want to get a shop involved so you can make sure all the firmware is updated and make sure it is all done right. Not having everything on the same or correct firmware for that component to work with everything can cause many problems and I have seen it happen before.
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Old 08-02-21, 09:06 AM
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here she is..

No use in trying a new wheelset I supposed. I got the bike with the spoke magnet not properly aligned with the sensor on the chainstay. How inaccurate would the speed and mileage sensor be as a result?

I think a 38t chainring works really well for this bike, but I'm not sure I need 11-36t in the rear. I haven't spent nearly enough time on the bike just yet to decide for certain, but shifting down before a hill simply resulted in less boost and more effort needing to be exerted whilst climbing.

Lets say I found some 185mm crank arms which fit the Bosch motor and maybe changed the rear cassette. Would that cause any issues?
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Old 08-02-21, 07:31 PM
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Well shoot, ole' Drippy did it. Congrats.

YOU DO NOT WANT LONGER CRANKS ON AN EBIKE!!!!!!!!! I want really short cranks probably 160 a whole 10mm shorter than I normally ride pedal strike is real and a pain in a arse. Trust me the bottom bracket or what would be that area is generally quite low and if you saw my crank arms they look like crap (and not just because they aren't Scottish) they are torn up because they are simply too long.

However changing cranks and cassette is fine and that wouldn't cause issue. It is when you change the whole drivetrain to say Enviolo or Rohloff E-14 or something like that or if you are changing wheel sizes that causes the big issues.

A non aligned magnet will cause a ton of issues namely probably not actually working right at all.
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Old 08-03-21, 07:53 AM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
Well shoot, ole' Drippy did it. Congrats.

YOU DO NOT WANT LONGER CRANKS ON AN EBIKE!!!!!!!!! I want really short cranks probably 160 a whole 10mm shorter than I normally ride pedal strike is real and a pain in a arse. Trust me the bottom bracket or what would be that area is generally quite low and if you saw my crank arms they look like crap (and not just because they aren't Scottish) they are torn up because they are simply too long.

However changing cranks and cassette is fine and that wouldn't cause issue. It is when you change the whole drivetrain to say Enviolo or Rohloff E-14 or something like that or if you are changing wheel sizes that causes the big issues.

A non aligned magnet will cause a ton of issues namely probably not actually working right at all.
The bottom bracket on this bike is 305mm... that's quite high.

I've since then aligned the magnet properly. The odo claimed I went 13km since buying the bike, checking the trip on Google maps specified 16km.
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Old 08-08-21, 12:15 AM
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I'm a month shy of 2 years with a Verve+ (original) that I've got nearly 4K miles of commuting on. Last month I had to have a warranty replacement of my rear wheel because the rims were cracking around multiple spokes. Roads where I live are quite bad, including the main street I'm on for 6 of my 14 mile round trip to/from work. Also sometimes I can be pretty loaded down on those bad roads, especially if I stop at the grocery store. Anyway, just something to keep an eye on. Though your bike is newer, it appears as though we have the same wheels.

I'm on my ~3rd set of tires (less than a year in I took a massive nail in the side wall) and have decided the stock Bontrager H5s simply aren't cutting it. Just before the rim replacement I had gotten a new set of Kenda Kwick Journey tires. I wanted a different model that was nub-ier on the sides but stock levels in 45c weren't playing along. These tires are decent so far though. I had gotten multiple flats over a couple weeks as the tire thinned out so it was time. Used the tire change as an opportunity to get new tubes and put sealant in them as well.

I'm on my second chain as well, but it was more of a troubleshooting measure the shop took when diagnosing a different issue, which resulted in a warranty replacement of the cassette.
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Old 08-12-21, 04:43 PM
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Originally Posted by shawn_dubs View Post
I'm a month shy of 2 years with a Verve+ (original) that I've got nearly 4K miles of commuting on. Last month I had to have a warranty replacement of my rear wheel because the rims were cracking around multiple spokes. Roads where I live are quite bad, including the main street I'm on for 6 of my 14 mile round trip to/from work. Also sometimes I can be pretty loaded down on those bad roads, especially if I stop at the grocery store. Anyway, just something to keep an eye on. Though your bike is newer, it appears as though we have the same wheels.

I'm on my ~3rd set of tires (less than a year in I took a massive nail in the side wall) and have decided the stock Bontrager H5s simply aren't cutting it. Just before the rim replacement I had gotten a new set of Kenda Kwick Journey tires. I wanted a different model that was nub-ier on the sides but stock levels in 45c weren't playing along. These tires are decent so far though. I had gotten multiple flats over a couple weeks as the tire thinned out so it was time. Used the tire change as an opportunity to get new tubes and put sealant in them as well.

I'm on my second chain as well, but it was more of a troubleshooting measure the shop took when diagnosing a different issue, which resulted in a warranty replacement of the cassette.
how much do you typically weigh on average with or without carrying groceries? seems to be that these are well constructed wheels. the roads where I live are also quite bad. I've invested in a Suntour suspension seatpost.
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Old 08-12-21, 04:53 PM
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During that timeframe I've weighed between 155-165. I have two 20L paniers that I usually fill, but the worst case scenario there (e.g. if they were full of water), which is never the case, would be 88 pounds on top of my weight, making the total well under the 300 lbs limit.
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Old 08-12-21, 06:37 PM
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Originally Posted by shawn_dubs View Post
During that timeframe I've weighed between 155-165. I have two 20L paniers that I usually fill, but the worst case scenario there (e.g. if they were full of water), which is never the case, would be 88 pounds on top of my weight, making the total well under the 300 lbs limit.
I currently weigh somewhere between 190-195. On average, my combined weight can get quite close to 290lb. I make sure not to get close to 300lb.

With a good suspension seatpost and simply being careful, is there a risk of my wheel cracking? seems to me that the wheelset is the same as the e bike vs. regular verve version and not beefed up for the application of the heavier load on poor quality pavement.

could also be overtightened spokes which caused the cracking?
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Old 08-12-21, 06:42 PM
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I'm hoping it was just a fluke and it won't happen with this new wheel.

Didn't mean to get you paranoid, just saying keep an eye out in case it's a broader problem.

I never touch spokes, way out of my area of knowledge. I did have a spoke pop early on (while it was just sitting there in my apartment, wasn't riding or on it or anything) and the shop fixed it. Wouldn't think it'd be that since it's only been the experts touching them.
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Old 08-12-21, 07:31 PM
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Originally Posted by shawn_dubs View Post
I'm hoping it was just a fluke and it won't happen with this new wheel.

Didn't mean to get you paranoid, just saying keep an eye out in case it's a broader problem.

I never touch spokes, way out of my area of knowledge. I did have a spoke pop early on (while it was just sitting there in my apartment, wasn't riding or on it or anything) and the shop fixed it. Wouldn't think it'd be that since it's only been the experts touching them.
Alot of the guys you'd find working in your average shop aren't exactly what I would call experts.

The fact that you had a spoke pop without even being on the actual bike seems to be a clear indication that someone overtightened your spokes, which could be why your rim cracked.
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Old 08-12-21, 07:31 PM
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I actually placed an order for some Joseph Kuosac e-bike crank arms in 185mm size yesterday..
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Old 08-13-21, 09:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
Alot of the guys you'd find working in your average shop aren't exactly what I would call experts.

The fact that you had a spoke pop without even being on the actual bike seems to be a clear indication that someone overtightened your spokes, which could be why your rim cracked.
And you know this how???
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Old 08-13-21, 09:39 PM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
And you know this how???
I did not say this definitely. I said it merely as a possibility.
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Old 08-13-21, 09:42 PM
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Originally Posted by shawn_dubs View Post
I'm hoping it was just a fluke and it won't happen with this new wheel.

Didn't mean to get you paranoid, just saying keep an eye out in case it's a broader problem.

I never touch spokes, way out of my area of knowledge. I did have a spoke pop early on (while it was just sitting there in my apartment, wasn't riding or on it or anything) and the shop fixed it. Wouldn't think it'd be that since it's only been the experts touching them.
How do you normally ride your verve? Spirited? Hilly area? Which mode do you use most?

Honestly I haven't ridden mine much, but I tend to cycle through all the modes and mostly stay in tour. Definetly ride at a relatively high average speed. Not many hills.

I'm sure a somewhat steeper head tube angle woukd have been nice, but I find that the handling is plenty sharp even for more spirited riding. I think the geometry is perfectly suited to the way i fit on the bike, even though I like a more sporty ride.

Managing to somehow make the bike lighter would be the single best way to improve handling performance.
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Old 08-13-21, 09:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
I did not say this definitely. I said it merely as a possibility.
Originally Posted by Moisture View Post
Alot of the guys you'd find working in your average shop aren't exactly what I would call experts.

The fact that you had a spoke pop without even being on the actual bike seems to be a clear indication that someone overtightened your spokes, which could be why your rim cracked.
Didn't sound like possibility it sounded like a pretty strong statement.
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Old 08-23-21, 07:45 AM
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Originally Posted by shawn_dubs View Post
I'm hoping it was just a fluke and it won't happen with this new wheel.

Didn't mean to get you paranoid, just saying keep an eye out in case it's a broader problem.

I never touch spokes, way out of my area of knowledge. I did have a spoke pop early on (while it was just sitting there in my apartment, wasn't riding or on it or anything) and the shop fixed it. Wouldn't think it'd be that since it's only been the experts touching them.
How many km or miles roughly have you put on your verve so far? Are you happy with the bike overall?

I've gotten a chance to spend some more time with the bike. I got about 65km range total on my first battery drain which is totally fine for my needs.

I am a somewhat spirited rider which coincides strangely with the intentions of the verve. With that being said, the bike still handles that sort of riding well. It has a rather high trail figure.. even higher than my mountain bike. It refuses to be pushed quickly into turns and motivates the rider to chain together a series of smooth and fluid turns. It feels very rewarding and highly responsive when done right. For a 54lb bike, can't complain.

if possible to make it lighter, that would be the first major thing with this bike. Next would be the head tube angle. I'd imagine that an e bike would need a steeper head tube angle than the non e version to account for the extra weight. They did the opposite. 68.5 is normal for a trail bike with a long suspension fork, not a hybrid bike.

Overall, the bike is comfortable and extremely stable thanks to the longer top tube than what I've been used to. I had to brake quickly on a slight incline with some loose sand surfacing while carrying about 30lb in my panniers which really put into perspective how stable and easily controlled this bike is even when you try to overwhelm it. The extra weight in the panniers actually really helped to improve handling balance.
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