Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Electronics, Lighting, & Gadgets
Reload this Page >

Bike headlight matching car headlight wattage

Electronics, Lighting, & Gadgets HRM, GPS, MP3, HID. Whether it's got an acronym or not, here's where you'll find discussions on all sorts of tools, toys and gadgets.

Bike headlight matching car headlight wattage

Reply

Old 08-06-18, 12:42 PM
  #51  
TimothyH
- Soli Deo Gloria -
 
TimothyH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Northwest Georgia
Posts: 10,905

Bikes: 2018 Rodriguez Custom Fixed Gear, 2017 Niner RLT 9 RDO, 2015 Bianchi Pista, 2002 Fuji Robaix

Mentioned: 148 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4758 Post(s)
Originally Posted by angerdan View Post
Doesn't matter, ebike mounted lights are also just battery powered. Booth use DC and booth have around 6-12V voltage.
So only the voltage matters. Some light offer even 5-24V input voltage, especially from Supernova.
So for this particular light, how is it powered and mounted on something other than an e-bike?

I'm sincerely asking out of ignorance. Not trying to challenge and I have not looked at the manufacturer's website in depth yet. If the answer is in the manufacturer's documentation then so be it.

I am interested in this product.
TimothyH is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-18, 08:15 PM
  #52  
there
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 39
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
I'd like to run a light off of a lipo battery, and regenerate energy for the lipo battery from braking and riding in "regen" mode (a mode where there is a slight constant friction applied to the bike to regenerate the battery). I understand that regenerating drive power is typically very low -- online I've seen 5-10% capable recoup numbers for drive power, although this 2013 EPA / UMich study points to 70% possible (https://archive.epa.gov/otaq/technology/web/html/research-hhb.html) -- but in terms of powering a light, that ought to be quite a bit less than what's required for drive power. (By drive power I'm referring to the power needed to actually move the bicycle forward. This is in contrast to the power needed to run a 10-30 watt light.)

Last edited by there; 08-09-18 at 06:51 AM.
there is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-18, 02:11 PM
  #53  
angerdan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Germany
Posts: 326
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 88 Post(s)
Lightbulb

Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
So for this particular light, how is it powered and mounted on something other than an e-bike?
I have not looked at the manufacturer's website in depth yet. If the answer is in the manufacturer's documentation then so be it.
I am interested in this product.
PRODUCT DETAILS
Input voltage 24 V – 60 V DC (75 V max.)
Mounting is possible with the Trelock mount (ZL HB 100), B&M mount (B&M 470LH) or several Supernova bicycle mounts.

It can be powered by 7S battery packs or 24V powerbanks.
https://enerprof.de/shop/batteries/p...harger-5v-24v/
https://enerprof.de/shop/batteries/e...tery-10x3-diy/
https://www.xtpower.de/XT-16000QC2-P...0mAh-up-to-24V
https://www.xtpower.de/XT-20000QC2-P...-5V-12V-to-24V
angerdan is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-18, 03:39 PM
  #54  
TimothyH
- Soli Deo Gloria -
 
TimothyH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Northwest Georgia
Posts: 10,905

Bikes: 2018 Rodriguez Custom Fixed Gear, 2017 Niner RLT 9 RDO, 2015 Bianchi Pista, 2002 Fuji Robaix

Mentioned: 148 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4758 Post(s)
Thank you for this. Very informative.
TimothyH is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-18, 03:25 PM
  #55  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Village, New York City
Posts: 34,585

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1973 Raleigh Twenty, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 341 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4024 Post(s)
Originally Posted by there View Post
I'd like to run a light off of a lipo battery, and regenerate energy for the lipo battery from braking and riding in "regen" mode (a mode where there is a slight constant friction applied to the bike to regenerate the battery). I understand that regenerating drive power is typically very low -- online I've seen 5-10% capable recoup numbers for drive power, although this 2013 EPA / UMich study points to 70% possible (https://archive.epa.gov/otaq/technology/web/html/research-hhb.html) -- but in terms of powering a light, that ought to be quite a bit less than what's required for drive power. (By drive power I'm referring to the power needed to actually move the bicycle forward. This is in contrast to the power needed to run a 10-30 watt light.)
Regenerative braking is not likely ever to be practical for bicycles. It would be heavy and expensive. The weight would add to the effort required to pedal the bike. The cost would not justify the amount of energy you get, and you would get very, very little. Bikes don't brake that often, and the amount of energy is very low because speeds are low and so is mass. Just forget it. It is possible to charge a battery with a dynamo hub, and even that is not worth the expense unless you are going to be away from a power outlet for a few days.
__________________
Tom Reingold, [email protected]
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-18, 07:59 AM
  #56  
Nachoman
hello!
 
Nachoman's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Point Loma, CA
Posts: 14,727

Bikes: Bill Holland (Road-Ti), Fuji Roubaix Pro (back-up), Bike Friday (folder), Co-Motion (tandem) & Trek 750 (hybrid)

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 259 Post(s)
One of the guys I 'night ride' with uses one of the brightest NiteRiders. Not sure which model it is.
When I'm out in front, and look behind me, his light is so bright it's indistinguishable from a motorcycle.
It looks like a locomotive is bearing down on me.
Seems great for riding solo. But unless you're out front leading the pack, it's a bit bright for group rides.
__________________
.
.

Two wheels good. Four wheels bad.
Nachoman is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-18, 09:01 PM
  #57  
bluehills3149
Senior Member
 
bluehills3149's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Brooklyn USA
Posts: 143

Bikes: depends what week it is..

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 44 Post(s)
About 20 years ago I set out to build the brightest bike lamp possible. Using a fancy 20w halogen MR16 bulb that had some (expensive at the time) tech that meant it put out the equivalent of a usual 50w lamp, I then overvolted it to 14 v (a 12v halogen lamp at 14 v outputs about double the lumens but shaves 90% off its life) so it was the equivalent of a 100w halogen light. Mounted in a piece of PVC pipe and with a chunky lead acid battery it lasted about 30 mins - enough for my commute.
Problem was it was too bright. Pedestrians would freeze in place like an animal in a hunter's spotlight and cars would flash their lights at me like I was demonic. So although is was great on dark paths, lighting the way like it was daylight I retired it to my "old gadget drawer", never to run again.
bluehills3149 is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service