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60 YO looking for advice about clipless

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60 YO looking for advice about clipless

Old 09-06-15, 03:17 PM
  #76  
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I tried out the Novara flexible fiber/nylon/whatever half-clips from REI with quills and 5-10s. Those half-clips were useless in that application, at least IME - when I attempted to flip the pedal, the toe of the shoe invariably was positioned on top of the clip, because the top of the clip extended too far into the pedal.

The clip you show looks like it wouldn't have that problem.
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Old 09-07-15, 09:33 PM
  #77  
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Sorry I'm late

Originally Posted by DAC17 View Post
Background: I'm a long-time runner (37 years), but as I got slower and more sore after some longer runs, I took up cycling as a cross-training sport about 6 years ago. Since then, I've heard a lot about the advantages of clipless pedals, but I can't see my way clear (fear mainly, since I was hit from behind a year ago...) to getting full road shoes and clipless performance pedals. Is there any middle ground that anyone knows of maybe mountain bike shoes and pedals that would be easier to unclip from? I ride a Trek FX 7.5 and currently average about 16 mph on flat pedals, if that matters for anything.

I'm sure this has been discussed before, but the search function appears to be down.

Thanks.
I'm a bit late to the party, but if the OP is still checking this thread, my first piece of advice is to completely ignore anything that Nightshade says about clipless pedals.

My personal favorite combination is Shimano M324 (mountain) or A530 (touring) double sided pedals. One side is a traditional flat pedal and the other is SPD clipless. I pair these with the Shimano MT34 mountain bike shoe which is part of their Click'R line which is specifically designed for easy release and comfortable walkability off the bike. Almost all Shimano shoes now come with their multi-release (silver) cleats rather than the single-release (black). The multi-release with clip out in any direction except straight forward or straight back while the single release require a more specific twist of the heel. IMHO if you don't have multi-release they are a good upgrade.

Whichever pedal you get, there is a retention adjustment that requires a hex wrench. IMHO, the factory setting is higher than most riders will ever need and it's where some new riders have problems. My suggestion is to back the tension all the way to the lightest setting then practice clipping in and out while supporting yourself against a fence, wall, or post. This is also time to tune the placement of your cleats which can be adjusted fore and aft, side to side, and angle of axis. Start by placing them under the ball of your foot at an angle so that they point straight forward when your foot is in its natural position on the pedal. After you have the feel for clipping in and out, practice in a low risk area. If you find yourself accidentally clipping-out increase the retention a half turn at a time until you find the setting to your liking. Contrary to what Nightshade and a few others might say, properly adjusted cleats and pedals DO NOT lock you to your bike. They help keep your foot in position even under wet or rough conditions but allow you to easily step off the pedals. I ride clipless on my MTB and have had to put a foot down quickly many times with no problem from the SPDs. I've even had a few unanticipated stops in positions other than upright and the SPDs have released cleanly and appropriately every time with no effort on my part.

As with any new piece of equipment, practice in a low risk environment at first. Many people first trying out clipless will forget they are clipped in at least once when they come to a stop and a very low speed tipover could result. Keeping the retention setting low and using multi-release cleats will minimize the chances of this happening. Even early on when I forgot I was clipped in, I would slightly startle myself when I felt the cleat release but I was still able to get a foot down in time. Only twice did I actually tip over and both were before someone showed my how to adjust the pedal retention and cleat placement.

SPD clipless does require proper setup and a short learning curve but IMHO the benefits are worth it.
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Old 09-08-15, 04:11 AM
  #78  
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+1 No need to fear clipless if you take a little time to check out the different clipless systems, get your equipment set up right, and practice a little before heading out into traffic. I can think of a few instances where clipless might have prevented a crash or injury, such as when I've had to stand up over rough sections during wet conditions. I've had a foot slip off a flat pedal while standing and it is not fun.
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Old 09-08-15, 06:23 PM
  #79  
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Myosmith: Still watching the thread. Thanks much for the post. Exactly the kind of idea I was looking for. I'm going to check out your suggestion tomorrow or Thursday.
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Old 09-08-15, 07:24 PM
  #80  
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Originally Posted by qcpmsame View Post
I doubt that, we have several regulars that still use toe clips and straps here, I do ride SPD-SL now, but I am planning a future C&V build and quill pedals and clips will be on board. Some have had bad experiences back in the day with the strps too tight and the old style nailed on clips sticking, but I never had any issue with them. If you have something that works for you, use it and more power to you.
I'm one of them... I have toe clips and straps on my old classic Fuji road bike. They just look right on that bike and they work well. I don't know if I have some type of "mental issue" with clipless pedals, but I just can't get into them. I know there are dozens and dozens of makes and models out there, and the really do work well. One of these days, I might give them a try... might...

Edit - I saw a photo that 10 Wheels posted about using VO half clips and has been for well over 50,000 miles (or something like that). That's all the proof I need! Thank you 10 Wheels!

Last edited by ButchA; 09-08-15 at 07:41 PM. Reason: Added a little bit about 10 Wheels
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Old 09-08-15, 07:49 PM
  #81  
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My experience has been exactly as described by Myosmith. His advice is spot on. Shimano SPD, just takes the proper tension adjustment and a little practice.
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Old 09-08-15, 08:39 PM
  #82  
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Originally Posted by DAC17 View Post
Myosmith: Still watching the thread. Thanks much for the post. Exactly the kind of idea I was looking for. I'm going to check out your suggestion tomorrow or Thursday.
In the past I had SPD pedals on all my bikes - mountain, touring, road. This time around I went with Crankbrothers BMX platform with my hiking shoes, which are goretex and waterproof. It has been way to dry to worry about rain here in S. California, but my shoes stick to those BMX pedals so well that it almost feels the same as the SPD's.

I wanted something with more flexibility to wear what shoes I happen to have on for a short ride and use my hiking shoes with a Superfeet insert, which makes them plenty stiff. Comfortable on the bike, off the bike and can comfortably walk anywhere I need.

I like the SPD's and I am loving the Crankbrother platforms with the adjustable spikes. Really grip well. No need for a toe clip, which I did use for a while with MKS pedals, metal clip & leather strap. Those were fine too.

YMMV, but I would go with what ever you feel comfortable with. Anything we say based on our personal preferences and experience may not apply for you. POSSIBLE FLAMES - There are no real evidence, tests, studies, etc. that any of us can produce that show that going clipped is superior that I have been able to find. - End of Possible Flame Statement
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Old 09-09-15, 11:35 AM
  #83  
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Originally Posted by DAC17 View Post
Thanks to all for the various viewpoints. I see there are no "correct" answers; all depends on your view. I may try the two-sdied pedals to start, and see how that goes.

And the mirror idea is absolutely correct.
The only purpose for clipless pedals is shoe retention and for that, they all work. It really becomes a personal preference as to which system you decide to go with and who's advertising you want to believe. Personally, I use MTB shoes with Shimano M530 pedals on my road bike. Unlike the M520, the M530 has a cage around the retainer that allows the shoe to make contact with the pedal and gives you more shoe to pedal contact area.

Edit: And Myosmith's post is pretty much spot on.
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Old 09-09-15, 01:03 PM
  #84  
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I can only add my own experience. I use Speedplay on my road bike with road shoes. I also use SPD on my cross bike with Mtn Shoes. The Speedplays are excellent if you want a secure attachment. The SPDs are sometimes troubling to me but only because they are so easy, at least for me, to come out of. But, if you are worried about being able to unclip SPDs should do it for you. I was understanding of but not a particular a fan of Mtn bike shoes for the road. But, I recently bought a pair of Spidi Mtn bike shoes (on sale of course) and they are really nice. I wouldn't have a problem using them on a road bike.
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Old 09-09-15, 03:43 PM
  #85  
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You know... when I was able to buy PD-7400 DA pedals, new take-off, for $10 in 1988 I promised myself that I would go clipless after they wore out...

...and I still intend to.

John
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Old 09-09-15, 04:41 PM
  #86  
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Myosmith for the win, in total!

70sSanO, don't you hate it when that happens.....

I am going to give the Speedplay X-5 a try, I talked with one of our LBS owners about my issues with Parkinson's Disease and unclipping from my spd-sl 105 pedals (the PD causes problems with control of my legs and ankles at times.) He uses the Light Action model and likes the release action they have. I chose the X-5 as the LA carries a warning about the ease they will release if you hammer any time. I do a times, although I am no sprint threat at all. I'll leave it there, I don't want to hi-jack the OP's thread. (any more than already) Besides the X-5 were on sale at Competitive Cyclist.

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Old 09-09-15, 05:34 PM
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If you have foot or pedal trouble, you ought to consider, at least, studded flat pedals and rubber-soled shoes. You'll have much more surface area under your shoe. The studs will grab the shoes, which might help with Parkinson's. You can move your foot in case of foot or knee pain. For shoes, I'm using FiveTens, but I suspect I could use my Brooks running shoes, not to mention Chrome or other FiveTen competitors.
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Old 09-09-15, 08:23 PM
  #88  
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Well, for me (since I resurrected the thread), I'm still using my SPD road pedals the vast majority of the time. I just want something when I take my bike with me on trips where I use it for "local" transportation instead of purely road riding. For example, another hobby is amateur astronomy and I attend "star parties" from time to time (gatherings of amateur astronomers for several days to a week at a remote site). Having my bike with me is very handy for getting around while onsite, but clipless pedals aren't the best choice for that. Still, I sometimes take a road ride or two, so having some kind of toe clip helps. The VO clips 10Wheels uses look like a good compromise for such situations. I can wear sneakers but not be totally "platform" if I get out on the road.
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Old 09-10-15, 05:31 AM
  #89  
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Originally Posted by philbob57 View Post
If you have foot or pedal trouble, you ought to consider, at least, studded flat pedals and rubber-soled shoes. You'll have much more surface area under your shoe. The studs will grab the shoes, which might help with Parkinson's. You can move your foot in case of foot or knee pain. For shoes, I'm using FiveTens, but I suspect I could use my Brooks running shoes, not to mention Chrome or other FiveTen competitors.
I appreciate the input, but I am not having any pain in the use of the spd-sl pedals at this time. Its mainly an ease of movement issue that the various muscle problems can bring on at times. I have ridden with plenty of the platform type pedals in the past, but I have had some type of positive engagement for my feet on the pedals since 1971 when I put my first pair of rat trap and cage/straps on that first "10-speed". The Speedplay X-5 is the lightest action, of their racing pedals, but still enough to keep a safe engagement under hard acceleration. their Light Action is too loose for my riding style.

I have slipped off of platform pedals too many times to be comfortable using them, even with the studded designs. And the soft soled shoes are not the ticket for me, either. Strangely, the various issues that PD can "offer" me makes for the use of stiff soled shoes a better option. I fond myself leaving my beloved New Balance 990, v.2, running shoes behind, and wearing an old school loafer, or my leather hard soled brogans, to work. It has to do with stability, and fall problems, that are some of my worst symptoms. Falling hard sucks.

Thanks for your ideas, it is nice to have constructive, positive people here in the forum.

Bill
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