Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fifty Plus (50+)
Reload this Page >

Tell me it an't so, or something else to worry about

Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

Tell me it an't so, or something else to worry about

Old 07-29-15, 01:20 PM
  #1  
bowzette
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 518
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Tell me it an't so, or something else to worry about

Cycling to extremes - VeloNews.com
My excuse for not riding "hard" or "often"
bowzette is offline  
Old 07-29-15, 02:07 PM
  #2  
berner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bristol, R. I.
Posts: 3,372

Bikes: Specialized Secteur, old Peugeot

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 280 Post(s)
Liked 18 Times in 14 Posts
I saw that also. While I may like to push the pace a bit, as an old man, I no longer need to push hard enough to hurt myself.
berner is offline  
Old 07-29-15, 02:08 PM
  #3  
rmfnla
Senior Member
 
rmfnla's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: La La Land (We love it!)
Posts: 6,330

Bikes: Gilmour road, Curtlo road; both steel (of course)

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 268 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Fits perfectly with my fitness mantra: No pain, no pain...
__________________
Today, I believe my jurisdiction ends here...
rmfnla is offline  
Old 07-29-15, 02:32 PM
  #4  
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 19,368

Bikes: 1959 & 1960 Capo; 1982 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 687 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
I don't worry about it, because I do not push myself that hard. My analogy is stretching, which one should take to the point of discomfort and challenge, but never pain.
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324
Capo: 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Old 07-29-15, 02:52 PM
  #5  
bowzette
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 518
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by rmfnla View Post
Fits perfectly with my fitness mantra: No pain, no pain...
Fully understand. I've been studying Joe Friel's latest book Cycling Fast after 50. Basically three types of workouts with plenty of recover between workouts to the point of creating a 9 day schedule or even 12 day if need for recovery. I going to work off a 9 day schedule with three days recovery between workouts. Also of the three hard workouts there is only one of "high" dosage, one of "medium" and one of "low" depending upon type of event and time of year.
bowzette is offline  
Old 07-29-15, 02:52 PM
  #6  
intransit1217
Senior Member
 
intransit1217's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Kenosha , Wi
Posts: 1,206

Bikes: 2013 specializes secure sport, Salsa vaya, Masi giramondo

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
That was eye opening. Thank you.
intransit1217 is offline  
Old 07-29-15, 02:55 PM
  #7  
intransit1217
Senior Member
 
intransit1217's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Kenosha , Wi
Posts: 1,206

Bikes: 2013 specializes secure sport, Salsa vaya, Masi giramondo

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Anybody go by the 15/85 % rule? 85% low hr and 15% high hr measured by total workout hours?
intransit1217 is offline  
Old 07-29-15, 02:58 PM
  #8  
Rick@OCRR
www.ocrebels.com
 
Rick@OCRR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Los Angeles area
Posts: 6,189

Bikes: Several bikes, Road, Mountain, Commute, etc.

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yes, I read that and it really hit home since I had what seemed like a heart attack last week (yes, pushing very intense . . . 175 bpm up a climb) but, after spending the night in the hospital with all kinds of wires stuck on me (and taking my blood pressure every hour) . . . they determined it wasn't a "heart attack" but simply a slightly torn muscle in my heart.

It's what they term a "cardiac episode" which I think is a funny name, but what do I know. Anyway, the cardiologist has limited me to 165 bpm max but otherwise no worries, I can still ride double centuries and other epic climbing rides.

Rick / OCRR
Rick@OCRR is offline  
Old 07-29-15, 04:04 PM
  #9  
Biker395 
Seat Sniffer
 
Biker395's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: SoCal
Posts: 4,600

Bikes: 2008 Scott CR1 Pro; 2006 Schwinn Fastback Pro and 1996 Colnago Decor Super C96; 2003 Univega Alpina 700; 2000 Schwinn Super Sport

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 435 Post(s)
Liked 27 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by John E View Post
I don't worry about it, because I do not push myself that hard. My analogy is stretching, which one should take to the point of discomfort and challenge, but never pain.
That's me too. I know there are those that push themselves really hard, time themselves and monitor their improvement ... but that's not me. Heck, the bikes I've been riding as of late don't even have speedometers on them.

I suppose it's possible, but I rather doubt riding a bike at a conversational pace is damaging to your heart, regardless of how long you do it for. I'm sure our ancestors evolved to maintain that kind of pace for hours at a time without damage.
__________________
Proud parent of a happy inner child ...
www.photo395.com
Biker395 is offline  
Old 07-29-15, 04:47 PM
  #10  
Biker395 
Seat Sniffer
 
Biker395's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: SoCal
Posts: 4,600

Bikes: 2008 Scott CR1 Pro; 2006 Schwinn Fastback Pro and 1996 Colnago Decor Super C96; 2003 Univega Alpina 700; 2000 Schwinn Super Sport

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 435 Post(s)
Liked 27 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by Rick@OCRR View Post
Yes, I read that and it really hit home since I had what seemed like a heart attack last week (yes, pushing very intense . . . 175 bpm up a climb) but, after spending the night in the hospital with all kinds of wires stuck on me (and taking my blood pressure every hour) . . . they determined it wasn't a "heart attack" but simply a slightly torn muscle in my heart.

It's what they term a "cardiac episode" which I think is a funny name, but what do I know. Anyway, the cardiologist has limited me to 165 bpm max but otherwise no worries, I can still ride double centuries and other epic climbing rides.

Rick / OCRR
Cripes, Rick. When did that happen? It wasn't this Sunday, was it?
__________________
Proud parent of a happy inner child ...
www.photo395.com
Biker395 is offline  
Old 07-29-15, 05:19 PM
  #11  
nobodyhere
Banned.
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Still looking for myself
Posts: 205
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
75 yo, AFib 11 years ago, ablation 10 years ago, normal sinus rhythm since. Cross-trainer including easy/moderate/"for pleasure" bicycling, swimming, walking/hiking and stretching. According to the doc the old ticker is plugging along just fine. Lots of other interests and activities, don't sit well or long.

Everything in moderation is my motto.
nobodyhere is offline  
Old 07-29-15, 05:29 PM
  #12  
StanSeven
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Delaware shore
Posts: 13,061

Bikes: Cervelo C5, Guru Photon, Waterford, Specialized CX

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 576 Post(s)
Liked 26 Times in 24 Posts
Originally Posted by intransit1217 View Post
Anybody go by the 15/85 % rule? 85% low hr and 15% high hr measured by total workout hours?
I do that mostly because I'm a long time competitive runner that got into cycling. I tried many schedules and programs over the years running. That formula was the only one that worked. I know people that did much higher intensity workouts for a much might percentage that 15%, like 50%. Most either were injured or burnt out and don't fun.

I do that now cycling. I made dramatic improvements in performance by gradually increasing the distance with the occassional speed workout (interval, fast group ride, individual TT, etc.) keeping in at no more than 15-20% of my total.
StanSeven is offline  
Old 07-29-15, 05:40 PM
  #13  
Rick@OCRR
www.ocrebels.com
 
Rick@OCRR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Los Angeles area
Posts: 6,189

Bikes: Several bikes, Road, Mountain, Commute, etc.

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Biker395 View Post
Cripes, Rick. When did that happen? It wasn't this Sunday, was it?
No, it was the previous week, racing David and Doug up Pelican Hill. Stayed at 175 bpm for a couple minutes, then felt this sharp pain right above where (I think) my heart is. Eased off and rolled back to the park with the pain dramatically reduced . . . but still there. Rode to work the next day and could still feel the pain.

So, I called Peg Miller who is a Kaiser Permanente nurse and asked her. She asked me a few very specific questions and decided it was a strained muscle, but . . . I should go in and have it checked out.

So I did. I told Jackie I'd be gone for an hour or two; ended up having to spend the night. All kinds of tests, taking blood every 6 hours, 2 different EKG's, blood pressure every hour (no, didn't get much sleep that night!). Finally got to do a stress test on a treadmill (never been on one before!) and did great on that. I kept asking for more speed and more % elevation but when my bpm's got to 165 the cardiologist made me quit.

In the end . . . they said it was a strained muscle; no heart attack at all. Dr. said I could go ahead and ride as much as I want, just keep the bpm's @ 165 or below. Let me out on Sat. afternoon; rode GMR/GRR the next day. Actually, on the Crystal Lake ride we did last Sun. I kept my heart rate at 120 or below. And that includes the Little GMR climb.

Big picture, no worries and the only thing I learned is that if you don't want to be kept waiting at Intensive Care or the Emergency room (which is where Intensive Care sent me), all you have to say is "chest pain" and it's your ticket to immediate service . Oh, and I learned my resting heart rate is 50 bpm.

Rick / OCRR

Vic, I just posted this on fb too since several people had heard about it 2nd hand and thought I really did have a heart attack.

Last edited by Rick@OCRR; 07-29-15 at 05:59 PM.
Rick@OCRR is offline  
Old 07-29-15, 08:52 PM
  #14  
TCR Rider
Senior Member
 
TCR Rider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
Posts: 867

Bikes: Pinarello Dogma F8 Giant TCR Advanced 2 Jamis Coda

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 177 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 7 Posts
The article hits very close to home for me. I started distance running around 30 yrs of age. Competed in countless races of distances from 5k to the Marathon. Not a stellar runner but solid upper middle of the pack. Qualified for and ran the Boston Marathon. I regularly ran 50 miles a week for over 20 years without issue. Due to orthopedic issues I transitioned to cycling about 10 years ago. I had my first episode of ventricular tachycardia two and a half years ago at the age of 61. I was riding on the trainer doing a Spinnerval workout at the time when my heart started racing and fluttering. Looked at the Garmin and my heart rate was just over 200 when normally I have a low max heartrate around 155. My legs were wobbly and it didn't get any better in a half hour so my wife called the EMTs and I was taken to the ER. By the time I got to the hospital the V Tach had passed and all my EKG was normal. I was admitted and stayed in the hospital for 2 days. They never really made a diagnosis because everything was back to normal.
Fast forward about a year and a half and it happened again as I was cresting a hill. Was able to soft pedal home but it felt really weird. Again I waited for it to pass, big mistake I later learned, but it began to get worse. EMTs called again and this time they had to do a cardioversion in the ambulance on the way to the ER. After a Cardiac MRI they found some scaring on the heart and an ablation was performed. The Electrophysiologist couldn't resolve it so it was strongly recommended that I not go home without an ICD implanted in my chest. Just like the picture in the article. I had a couple of incidents when the ICD fired to return a normal rhythm so you could say I was not happy.
My cardiologist suggested a second ablation and referred me to an EP who is one of the top practitioners in the field. I had the second procedure on January 20th of this year. I was on the table for over five hours but the Doc was confident he was able to locate the cause and correct it. I'm now back to normal riding in both volume and intensity, within reason. I'm able to do intervals and rides up to a metric so far with no ill effects. I don't race and I don't let my heartrate get too high and base my riding on power. Two followups and so far so good. I'm told the longer you go without an episode after the procedure the less likely you are to have another. Cautiously optimistic.
Sorry for the long post but after reading the article I felt the need to unburden myself.
TCR Rider is offline  
Old 07-29-15, 10:20 PM
  #15  
augiedogie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Lubbock, tx
Posts: 61

Bikes: Specialized Crosstrail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have never understood why people push beyond recommendations like Max. beats per minute. Maybe you remember Jim Fix, The running book. The guy fell over at 50 from a heart attack, dead. It was discovered he had a heart of an 80 year old man. Years of long running had deprived his heart of the oxygen it needed. The walls of his heart were like paper. I see this also with people running too late in life and ruining their knees. IMHO, its better to not push the old bucket of bones. Once its worn out, in most cases, there's no replacement parts. So my advice to people is, everything in moderation.
augiedogie is offline  
Old 07-29-15, 10:25 PM
  #16  
Biker395 
Seat Sniffer
 
Biker395's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: SoCal
Posts: 4,600

Bikes: 2008 Scott CR1 Pro; 2006 Schwinn Fastback Pro and 1996 Colnago Decor Super C96; 2003 Univega Alpina 700; 2000 Schwinn Super Sport

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 435 Post(s)
Liked 27 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by augiedogie View Post
I have never understood why people push beyond recommendations like Max. beats per minute. Maybe you remember Jim Fix, The running book. The guy fell over at 50 from a heart attack, dead. It was discovered he had a heart of an 80 year old man. Years of long running had deprived his heart of the oxygen it needed. The walls of his heart were like paper. I see this also with people running too late in life and ruining their knees. IMHO, its better to not push the old bucket of bones. Once its worn out, in most cases, there's no replacement parts. So my advice to people is, everything in moderation.
The running isn't what damaged his heart and killed him. One could easily argue that the running extended his life by 11 years. From Wiki:

"On July 20, 1984, Fixx died at age 52 of a fulminant heart attack, after his daily run on Vermont Route 15 in Hardwick. The autopsy revealed that atherosclerosis had blocked one coronary artery 95%, a second 85%, and a third 70%.[SUP][3][/SUP] Still, medical opinion continued to uphold the link between exercise and longevity.[SUP][4][/SUP] In 1986 exercise physiologist Kenneth Cooperpublished an inventory of the risk factors that might have contributed to Fixx's death.[SUP][5][/SUP] Granted access to his medical records and autopsy, and after interviewing his friends and family, Cooper concluded that Fixx was genetically predisposed (his father had a heart attack at 35 and died of another at 43, and Fixx himself had a congenitally enlarged heart), and had several lifestyle issues. Fixx was a heavy smoker prior to beginning running at age 36, he had a stressful occupation, he had undergone a second divorce, and his weight before he took up running had ballooned to 220 pounds (100 kg).[SUP][6]"[/SUP]
__________________
Proud parent of a happy inner child ...
www.photo395.com
Biker395 is offline  
Old 07-30-15, 04:15 AM
  #17  
OldsCOOL
Senior Member
 
OldsCOOL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: northern michigan
Posts: 12,416

Bikes: '77 Colnago Super, '76 Fuji The Finest, '88 Cannondale Criterium, '86 Trek 760, '87 Miyata 712

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 413 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
I've learned to accept when my body says "enough". Heat does this if I'm riding above 85F ambient (tarmac??). Those temps I ride but back off into casual mode. I am not an endurance rider, it does not match with my meso frame. TT's are a whole 'nuther thing. To me, there is no feeling like riding an all-out 6 or 15mi road course when in good shape.
OldsCOOL is offline  
Old 07-30-15, 07:15 AM
  #18  
qcpmsame 
Semper Fi
 
qcpmsame's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Barrineau Park, Florida
Posts: 12,402

Bikes: '80 Medici Pro Strada, '86 Tommasini Prestige, '12 CAAD 10 Ultegra

Mentioned: 81 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 971 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
If you aren't pushing yourself when you ride, walk, run, kayak, etc., I wouldn't worry. Unless you have some type of predisposition towards heart disease, or past cardiac history, and you have been having regular check ups, a normally paced workout isn't putting you at any more risk. Like Vic said above, Jim Fixx wasn't killed by his act of running, he had severe arteriosclerosis and the blockage reached the point where if blocked off a main cardiac artery while he was on a regular run, for him. If you feel like you are having an episode like Lennard Zinn had, then get to a doctor, or an emergency room, if its that bad.

I am reading Joe Friel's, "Faster Past 50", too, and I take a lot away from it, and he cautions you about pushing things when you can feel that a problem is there. In all of Joe Friel's, and Lennard Zinn's books, they both recommend being cleared by a doctor prior to undertaking a hard, aggressive program. But, I am not surprised that Zinn went into denial after experieicing the symptoms of the irregularities in his HR and its rhythm. He competed at a high, serious level for quite a while, like many of us he felt that it could not possibly happen to him.

I could not tell you that it isn't a possibility for you to have something occur, I am not any kind of physician, or physiologist and I don't know anything about you, your workouts, or your current and past medical history. Listen to your body, and pay attention to what you feel/hear. I wouldn't obsess about things, unless you have a problem, and haven't done anything to assess your current health level. That aspect is up to each of us, individually.

Bill
__________________
I Didn't Choose To Have Parkinson's Disease, I Have Chosen Not To Allow It To Define How I Live
Life Member "Hairy Eared Engineer's Society"
"I Can Do All Things Through Christ, Whom Strengthens Me" Philippians 4:13
qcpmsame is offline  
Old 07-30-15, 07:44 AM
  #19  
big john
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 12,055
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 227 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 7 Posts
[QUOTE=Biker395;18026609]The running isn't what damaged his heart and killed him. One could easily argue that the running extended his life by 11 years. From Wiki:

QUOTE]

I read that he outlived all the other men in his family, despite his earlier self abusive lifestyle. (this is what I hope to accomplish)
big john is offline  
Old 07-30-15, 09:41 AM
  #20  
Slash5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Southern Ontario
Posts: 1,890
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 258 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Interesting article. I've found that if I push hard for a while, specially on road rides (mostly a mountain biker) I'll occasionally develop an arrhythmia - slowing down and taking a few deep breaths or coughing will settle it down. Not sure but heavy coffee drinking on the same day may make it more prevalent - watching for this.
Been checked over and the doctor was happy with my tests. That article explains why nothing shows on the test.
Slash5 is offline  
Old 07-30-15, 10:06 AM
  #21  
peterws
Senior Member
 
peterws's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Near Lancaster
Posts: 360

Bikes: Carrera Virtuoso and friend

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Sounds like common sense prevails at a certain age . . .I guess I could`ve been sucked into long distance cycling and running. But I wouldn`t wear the gear or pay the money for a decent racing bike, without which (I was assured by a "friend") I would not fit in!

Not that it matters. Being naturally stingy and lazy keeps you out of all sorts o` trouble . . .
peterws is offline  
Old 07-30-15, 10:31 AM
  #22  
bowzette
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 518
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I use to be a member of the Cooper's Aerobic Center in Dallas where Fixx died. It is my understanding he avoided getting a stress test EKG for years despite warnings from the doctors. For years I bought his annual running diary to record my miles when I was a runner. A sad day when he died. I made the original post as I though the article was interesting and "food for thought". What I found the most interesting was the comment that the medical profession understood what "too little" and "too much" endurance exercise was but the "gray" area between was unknown. I suspect this varies a lot with the individual and genetics. Years ago I use to race bikes and over the years often trained to ride with Cat 4 level racers even though not racing usually doing three hard rides a week. But I came to realize I need three days recovery recovery between hard rides (4 days if I really over do it) and if not careful I rode far too many miles/time at too high a heart rate. I really like Friel's new book. He is personally working off a 9 day week (schedule) to give himself three days of recovery, and using the "dosage" concept the "hard" workouts vary as to the degree of effort (intensity and distance/time) depending upon event and time of year. Unless I have a genetics issue I don't know about I'm hoping this approach will allow me to ride as a reasonably strong recreational rider (forget the racers) and avoid the heart issues discussed in the article. In my old age I have to do a reasonable amount of structured "training" to ride with the recreational rides I want to ride with, and I'm one of those strange riders that likes doing structured intervals on a trainer
bowzette is offline  
Old 07-30-15, 12:57 PM
  #23  
Jarrett2
Senior Member
 
Jarrett2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: DFW
Posts: 4,129

Bikes: Steel 1x's

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 630 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm 44 but still pay attention to this stuff. I'm not a long time, endurance competitor like the folks they talked about in the article. I start riding a little over 2 years ago. I have no intention of racing, but I do regularly do 50+ mile rides on the weekends and do 20+ mile rides most week days. I don't usually push too hard. Some days I'll chase a Strava KOM, but most days I just pedal along and never notice myself out of breath.

I hope they come up with a little more data for that gray area. I'd like to make sure I'm not inadvertently hurting myself when I'm trying to make myself better.
Jarrett2 is offline  
Old 07-30-15, 01:10 PM
  #24  
habilis
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Morris County, NJ
Posts: 1,106

Bikes: 90's Bianchi Premio, Raleigh-framed fixed gear, Trek 3500, Centurion hybrid, Dunelt 3-spd, Trek 800

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2166 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Lifestyle is, I think, the greater danger and can overwhelm a healthy exercise regimen. In the cited article, Mike Endicott was sleep-deprived and had downed two large cups of coffee (but no breakfast) before the ski race. His "perfect storm" consisted of much more than just over-exertion. Another cited victim of a cardiac episode needed a stent inserted in an artery, which (I believe) would indicate a blockage due to lifestyle and/or heredity. Jim Fixx had numerous health, heredity, and life-circumstance issues that weighed upon him. In short, the article provides a useful warning against hyper-exercising, but the biggest takeaway for me is, don't expect exercise to compensate for smoking, dietary mistakes, overwork, or any of the other components of an unhealthy lifestyle. No, I ain't a doctor, just an old guy.

Last edited by habilis; 07-30-15 at 01:15 PM.
habilis is offline  
Old 07-30-15, 01:59 PM
  #25  
tarwheel 
Senior Member
 
tarwheel's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 8,906

Bikes: Waterford RST-22, Bob Jackson World Tour, Ritchey Breakaway Cross, Soma Saga, De Bernardi SL, Specialized Sequoia

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 194 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Interesting article, and thanks for posting it. I'm 61 and in some ways in the best shape of my life. I've sensed for a while that extreme exertion at my age is not healthy, although I have not developed any of the symptoms described in the article. For me, the most telling issue has the long time it takes for me to recover after hard rides. That is one reason why I seldom participate in fast group rides any more. Another reason is the frequency of crashes with injuries on fast rides in my area. One of my main motivations for cycling is promoting good health, and crashes and heart attacks don't fit into that.

Much of my riding now is commuting. My commute distance is fairly long (30-32 miles RT), but I generally ride at a moderate pace. Most of my group riding now is with older friends who share a similar approach toward riding. We always warm up easily, ride at a moderate pace, and take regular stops for water, food and rest if needed. Although I track my ride statistics, I am mainly concerned with mileage, time and calories burned. I don't worry about average speeds any more. I am a bit of a mileage junkie, however, and perhaps need to tone that down. I've ridden my highest annual mileage totals over the past three years.

Last edited by tarwheel; 07-30-15 at 02:50 PM.
tarwheel is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.