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Keep my hybrid, or move on to a road bike?

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Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

Keep my hybrid, or move on to a road bike?

Old 12-14-15, 12:16 PM
  #26  
rumrunn6
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Originally Posted by BlazingPedals View Post
n + 1
this


... we're an evil bunch of junkies
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Old 12-14-15, 02:48 PM
  #27  
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Lots of good advice. Suggest it depends on they type of athlete you are. I rode a hybrid for 3 years at about 1,000 miles annually.

Then added a road bike and fell in love with it. A very different experience. Will ride over 6,300 miles this year, 6,200 in 2014 and 5,000 in 2013. Weight dropped from 256 to 215

Oh yes started at 63 and the road bike at 66 and 70 now. Agree 25mm or more tires a lot better along with a fitting etc.

Enjoy the journey

Last edited by Miami Biker; 12-14-15 at 08:48 PM.
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Old 12-14-15, 04:59 PM
  #28  
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N+1, add not subtract..
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Old 12-14-15, 05:19 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
this


... we're an evil bunch of junkies
Co-dependant enablers.
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Old 12-14-15, 05:22 PM
  #30  
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Interesting thread as I’m going through the same decision process. After years of riding a mountain bike, I found myself riding mostly on bike paths and asphalt and while the mountain bike was still enjoyable, I knew something lighter and faster would be great. I became convinced that a hybrid with road bike attributes would be the best of both worlds and ended up having one built. I bought a Felt carbon disk frame and equipped it with Shimano 105, 28 mm tires and a flat bar. I’ve got to say that I love this bike, and at 66 I’m riding more than ever. In fact, I’m riding so much that I’m dreaming of metric centuries and bike tours in Europe. And now I’m wondering if I shouldn’t keep the frame and rebuild it with drops. I didn’t really believe that advice about multiple hand positions but I’m starting to get it now. I think I’ll rent a nice road bike for a day and see what I think.I’ve also thought about keeping my hybrid AND a road bike but I’m pretty sure that one of them would be my favorite and it’s the only one I would ever ride. I’d like to hear some arguments and justifications for owning multiple, yet similar, bikes. I just need a reason to fill my garage with bikes.
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Old 12-14-15, 05:25 PM
  #31  
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How about something like a Gunnar Sport, taller headtube, and room for 32's. Really nice bikes and made in the good ole US of A
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Old 12-14-15, 05:41 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by roadweary View Post
Interesting thread as Iím going through the same decision process. After years of riding a mountain bike, I found myself riding mostly on bike paths and asphalt and while the mountain bike was still enjoyable, I knew something lighter and faster would be great. I became convinced that a hybrid with road bike attributes would be the best of both worlds and ended up having one built. I bought a Felt carbon disk frame and equipped it with Shimano 105, 28 mm tires and a flat bar. Iíve got to say that I love this bike, and at 66 Iím riding more than ever. In fact, Iím riding so much that Iím dreaming of metric centuries and bike tours in Europe. And now Iím wondering if I shouldnít keep the frame and rebuild it with drops. I didnít really believe that advice about multiple hand positions but Iím starting to get it now. I think Iíll rent a nice road bike for a day and see what I think.Iíve also thought about keeping my hybrid AND a road bike but Iím pretty sure that one of them would be my favorite and itís the only one I would ever ride. Iíd like to hear some arguments and justifications for owning multiple, yet similar, bikes. I just need a reason to fill my garage with bikes.
I use both my mountain bike, and my "utility road bike" - both equipped with rack and panniers - for shopping, errands, picking up the mail. I use the mountain bike for - well - mountain biking, mostly single track stuff. Also, the utility road bike is great to have when the road bike is in the shop.

I use another mtn bike on my little used trainer in the basement workout room.

If I want to jump on a bike without "kitting up" - I have platforms on the utility and mtn bike.
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Old 12-14-15, 06:00 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by roadweary View Post
Interesting thread as Iím going through the same decision process. After years of riding a mountain bike, I found myself riding mostly on bike paths and asphalt and while the mountain bike was still enjoyable, I knew something lighter and faster would be great. I became convinced that a hybrid with road bike attributes would be the best of both worlds and ended up having one built. I bought a Felt carbon disk frame and equipped it with Shimano 105, 28 mm tires and a flat bar. Iíve got to say that I love this bike, and at 66 Iím riding more than ever. In fact, Iím riding so much that Iím dreaming of metric centuries and bike tours in Europe. And now Iím wondering if I shouldnít keep the frame and rebuild it with drops. I didnít really believe that advice about multiple hand positions but Iím starting to get it now. I think Iíll rent a nice road bike for a day and see what I think.Iíve also thought about keeping my hybrid AND a road bike but Iím pretty sure that one of them would be my favorite and itís the only one I would ever ride. Iíd like to hear some arguments and justifications for owning multiple, yet similar, bikes. I just need a reason to fill my garage with bikes.
Sounds like your riding is similar to mine. I just got a road bike afer a couple yrs on a hybrid, see my post above. The difference is not subtle, even with my road-adapted cyclocross. I don't work as hard to go farther, I can slip more easily through a head wind, the multiple positions are an advantage. As you suspect, the hybrid is still the favorite and off-road is my favorite ride. But the hybrid is a compromise for anything but the most casual road treck.
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Old 12-14-15, 11:04 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by roadweary View Post
Interesting thread as Iím going through the same decision process. After years of riding a mountain bike, I found myself riding mostly on bike paths and asphalt and while the mountain bike was still enjoyable, I knew something lighter and faster would be great. I became convinced that a hybrid with road bike attributes would be the best of both worlds and ended up having one built. I bought a Felt carbon disk frame and equipped it with Shimano 105, 28 mm tires and a flat bar. Iíve got to say that I love this bike, and at 66 Iím riding more than ever. In fact, Iím riding so much that Iím dreaming of metric centuries and bike tours in Europe. And now Iím wondering if I shouldnít keep the frame and rebuild it with drops. I didnít really believe that advice about multiple hand positions but Iím starting to get it now. I think Iíll rent a nice road bike for a day and see what I think.Iíve also thought about keeping my hybrid AND a road bike but Iím pretty sure that one of them would be my favorite and itís the only one I would ever ride. Iíd like to hear some arguments and justifications for owning multiple, yet similar, bikes. I just need a reason to fill my garage with bikes.
Spot on. I own multiple bikes, as does my wife. She splits her time between two bikes; a modern Jamis road bike and a vintage Peugeot recently modified into a city bike, while I ride my Salsa 99% of the time. I had this fantasy of using one bike for club rides, another for around town, another as a beater, and another for light trails. In practice, I ride the same bike all the time and the others sit in the garage as theoretical backup bikes, or extras should an out of town friend or relative wants to go for a ride, which happens maybe once or twice a year. If I were rational about it, I would get rid of my extra bikes.
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Old 12-14-15, 11:57 PM
  #35  
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The advantage to multiple bicycles is indeed that you can still ride, when one of them lands in the shop for repairs.
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Old 12-15-15, 07:44 AM
  #36  
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So, OP (one4smoke) - you have been quiet whilst folks here pour out their advice. What say you to all of these great suggestions?
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Old 12-15-15, 08:17 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by nobodyhere View Post
So, OP (one4smoke) - you have been quiet whilst folks here pour out their advice. What say you to all of these great suggestions?
Agreed.
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Old 12-15-15, 11:17 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by nobodyhere View Post
One should not predicate their selection of a bicycle(s) based on their age, IMHO. You stated,



Heck, I did not even start riding until I was 58. Your back is not "old" at 53, IMHO.

So, now at 76, I keep two road bikes and one mountain bike for my riding pleasure. As far as the "old back" goes, I have found that the stretch of a road bike is great for my back. YMMV - only trying things out will tell.

Good luck - and keep in mind that you are not "old" yet. You are very young. Even I still feel "young."
I think how big your stomach is, is more of a factor for a road bike than a bike. I'm 50, a clyde, and I ride a road bike, so if you want one, then get one. There will probably be one thing that you'll find. You'll want to go faster on the road bike than it is safe to do on the MUP, so you'll probably start riding on the streets, and possibly in group rides.

GH
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Old 12-15-15, 11:24 AM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by roadweary View Post
Interesting thread as I’m going through the same decision process. After years of riding a mountain bike, I found myself riding mostly on bike paths and asphalt and while the mountain bike was still enjoyable, I knew something lighter and faster would be great. I became convinced that a hybrid with road bike attributes would be the best of both worlds and ended up having one built. I bought a Felt carbon disk frame and equipped it with Shimano 105, 28 mm tires and a flat bar. I’ve got to say that I love this bike, and at 66 I’m riding more than ever. In fact, I’m riding so much that I’m dreaming of metric centuries and bike tours in Europe. And now I’m wondering if I shouldn’t keep the frame and rebuild it with drops. I didn’t really believe that advice about multiple hand positions but I’m starting to get it now. I think I’ll rent a nice road bike for a day and see what I think.I’ve also thought about keeping my hybrid AND a road bike but I’m pretty sure that one of them would be my favorite and it’s the only one I would ever ride. I’d like to hear some arguments and justifications for owning multiple, yet similar, bikes. I just need a reason to fill my garage with bikes.
The easiest reason for having similar bikes is the older one can become a rain bike, commuter bike, or bike you ride while your primary is in the shop. Of course, then you might want to buy some more accessories for the older bike, like fenders, a pannier, and/or a rack.

GH
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Old 12-15-15, 04:50 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by roadweary View Post
Interesting thread as I’m going through the same decision process. After years of riding a mountain bike, I found myself riding mostly on bike paths and asphalt and while the mountain bike was still enjoyable, I knew something lighter and faster would be great. I became convinced that a hybrid with road bike attributes would be the best of both worlds and ended up having one built. I bought a Felt carbon disk frame and equipped it with Shimano 105, 28 mm tires and a flat bar. I’ve got to say that I love this bike, and at 66 I’m riding more than ever. In fact, I’m riding so much that I’m dreaming of metric centuries and bike tours in Europe. And now I’m wondering if I shouldn’t keep the frame and rebuild it with drops. I didn’t really believe that advice about multiple hand positions but I’m starting to get it now. I think I’ll rent a nice road bike for a day and see what I think.I’ve also thought about keeping my hybrid AND a road bike but I’m pretty sure that one of them would be my favorite and it’s the only one I would ever ride. I’d like to hear some arguments and justifications for owning multiple, yet similar, bikes. I just need a reason to fill my garage with bikes.
The key to having AND using multiple bikes is to make each one better at something than the other. Not sure what kind of frame you used to build your flat bar road bike. If it has room for wider tires, maybe it could double as a gravel or urban assault type bike. But if it was based on a typical road frame, you won't get a lot of variation.

Something to remember any time you convert a bike from flat bars to drop bars (aside from the expense of drop bar shift/brake levers) is that the drop bars will extend farther forward to the hand positions than the flat bars. Unless you needed a fairly long stem to make the flat bars fit right, you may not be able to use a short enough stem to make the drop bars fit right.

Last edited by BluesDawg; 12-15-15 at 05:50 PM.
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Old 12-15-15, 05:18 PM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by BluesDawg View Post
The key to having AND using multiple bikes is to make each one better at something than the other. Not sure what kind of frame you used to build your flat bar road bike. If it has room for wider tires, maybe make it could double as a gravel or urban assault type bike. But it was based on a typical road frame, you won't get a lot of variation.

Something to remember any time you convert a bike from flat bars to drop bars (aside from the expense of drop bar shift/brake levers) is that the drop bars will extend farther forward to the hand positions than the flat bars. Unless you needed a fairly long stem to make the flat bars fit right, you may not be able to use a short enough stem to make the drop bars fit right.
Thanks for the advice on the fit. I did a full fitting session before having my hybrid built and my bike shop assures me that I could make the bike work with drop bars and stem changes. However, your note reminded me to be skeptical about this and I appreciate that.
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Old 12-15-15, 05:44 PM
  #42  
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I started on a road bike and last winter I upgraded the bike. I sold the old one and bought a hybrid, but more of a trail bike. It's a Trek Dual Sport with front suspension and 700x38 tires.I wanted something to take on trails and rode.

I can't say if your hybrid is redundant if you have a road bike.

As to being comfortable on a road bike, it depends on you're physical condition and how the bike is "fit". I'm 60 and have no problem with my fit. You should be faster on a road bike but then again it has to do with you and the fit.
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Old 12-16-15, 11:45 AM
  #43  
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All self built, --I have:
1) a commuter bike (IGH with dynamo hub on 26" frame),
2) a singlespeed with lightweight fenders (LOVE this thing. It's my workout bike and knock around bike),
3) a superlight tourer (CF roadie converted to 650B, attachable rear fender, handlebar bag),
4) a steel lightweight tourer (853 LeMond converted to 650B, rear rack, rear fender)
5-9) various projects and frankenbikes

I think suspension systems are dumb (heavy, energy sapping, useless) [wait.. my old commuter had a suspension seatpost]

About the only things I don't have are:
Hybrid bike (IMO they are compromises of: too heavy, too slow, too uncomfortable, not really good at anything)
Mountain bike for single track (quit doing that stuff years ago, did I mention I don't like suspension systems?)

Last edited by dbg; 12-16-15 at 11:54 AM.
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Old 12-20-15, 08:59 AM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
Question for OP. Did you ever figure out a solution to your hand problem?
Sorry for the delayed response... Not really. I took it to the LBS where I purchased it, which is 200 miles away, and the owner tried to help me get fitted to it better. Did a couple adjustments to the saddle (fore/aft and tilt) and put a shorter stem on. Seemed to help a little (could just be wishful thinking), but I still go numb after a period of time. Honestly, I've pretty much gotten used to it now where it doesn't affect my mindset. I'll change hand positions, and even ride no hands for a couple of minutes to relieve it. Kinda accepted it I guess.
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Old 12-20-15, 09:02 AM
  #45  
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Thanks to all for the advice!
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Old 12-20-15, 09:23 AM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by nobodyhere View Post
So, OP (one4smoke) - you have been quiet whilst folks here pour out their advice. What say you to all of these great suggestions?
Been super busy with work, my apologies for not responding sooner. Great suggestions from all. Much appreciated.

If I could do it over, I'd probably have gone with a road bike initially. I like my Roam 2, but it's very heavy. I didn't realize how much weight made such a difference. After much experience now, I have changed my mind about the front suspension. The surfaces I ride on, it absolutely does me almost no good. A bike with a carbon fiber fork would have been just fine.

I really think drop bars will be better suited for me also. With the straight bars on the Roam, I've always felt my hands were spaced much too far apart. I spent a lot of time in my teenage years on a Raleigh 12 speed with drop bars, and have always loved the feel. Even though I'm much older now, I'm sure I'd still feel the same way. Now, maybe a year ago when I was topped out at 268, I may have been out-of-touch on one. But now at 190, I foresee no issues.

Again, thanks everyone for the help!
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Old 12-20-15, 11:53 AM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by one4smoke View Post
Now, maybe a year ago when I was topped out at 268, I may have been out-of-touch on one. But now at 190, I foresee no issues.
Yea!! (or maybe I should say 'Amen!')

The only arguments against pulling the trigger on a road bike are: a) if you feel like you can't afford it, or b) if you lack a safe place to store it. From what I've seen, it doesn't seem like either applies.
Originally Posted by Dave Cutter View Post
The drop from the top of my saddle to the top of my handlebars is only about an inch.
On my 'primary ride,' I suppose the drop is even less. It's only a fraction lower than level. I find that, on some of the group rides where I go 'down-level' to keep my wife company, several of the ladies have road bikes with bars actually above their seats. Hey, if it works for them, that's cool...

I'm also guessing that you have a good relationship with your Giant dealer. If I'm surmising correctly, no reason to mess with a good thing. Furthermore, if your memories of drop-handlebars are from your old Raleigh, you'll find that modern drop handlebars space your hands wider than you may remember on the old 'Randonneur' or (even more extreme) 'Pista' bars. Might feel a little weird at first (it did for me...) but you quickly get accustomed to having your rib-cage spaced at normal width. And- at the risk of adding something that you likely already know, it'll be easier to change hand-positions on a road bike. [And this can't do anything but help your hand-pain issues.]
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Old 12-20-15, 12:07 PM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by one4smoke View Post
Been super busy with work, my apologies for not responding sooner. Great suggestions from all. Much appreciated.

If I could do it over, I'd probably have gone with a road bike initially. I like my Roam 2, but it's very heavy. I didn't realize how much weight made such a difference. After much experience now, I have changed my mind about the front suspension. The surfaces I ride on, it absolutely does me almost no good. A bike with a carbon fiber fork would have been just fine.

I really think drop bars will be better suited for me also. With the straight bars on the Roam, I've always felt my hands were spaced much too far apart. I spent a lot of time in my teenage years on a Raleigh 12 speed with drop bars, and have always loved the feel. Even though I'm much older now, I'm sure I'd still feel the same way. Now, maybe a year ago when I was topped out at 268, I may have been out-of-touch on one. But now at 190, I foresee no issues.

Again, thanks everyone for the help!
Maybe switch to a handlebar that puts your hands in a more natural position while you ponder a switch to drop bars.
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Old 12-20-15, 12:27 PM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
Maybe switch to a handlebar that puts your hands in a more natural position while you ponder a switch to drop bars.
Yeah, I've thought about butterfly bars, but would need to change a number of things.
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Old 12-20-15, 01:57 PM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by oldnslow2 View Post
I started on a road bike and last winter I upgraded the bike. I sold the old one and bought a hybrid, but more of a trail bike. It's a Trek Dual Sport with front suspension and 700x38 tires.I wanted something to take on trails and rode.

I can't say if your hybrid is redundant if you have a road bike.

As to being comfortable on a road bike, it depends on you're physical condition and how the bike is "fit". I'm 60 and have no problem with my fit. You should be faster on a road bike but then again it has to do with you and the fit.
is a road bike really faster than a hybrid if they have the same wheel size/tire size?

most of the cyclists that I see on road bikes never use the drop bars and always sit upright .... there are some really fast light hybrids now such as the Trek 7.5 and 7.9 fx and many other hybrids with carbon frames and very good gearing
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