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Four years off the bike, and now I'm old

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Four years off the bike, and now I'm old

Old 07-20-16, 10:49 PM
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Grouch
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Four years off the bike, and now I'm old

53-year old looking for some advice.

Although I'm certainly not in cycling shape, I haven't lived a completely sedentary life since last riding in 2012. On the other hand, for the first time in my life I've noticed a little beer gut and love handles, and as my huffing and puffing after long shifts during my roller/inline hockey games tell me, aerobically I'm not in superior shape either.

I started riding again about two weeks ago. Last week was my first full week, and I rode about 9 hours for the week (guesstimate) and 140 miles. Most of it was at my normal, plodding pace mixed with a few brief periods of increased intensity. One of the days left me feeling completely trashed after the ride while the other four rides were pretty much what I expected except that on Monday after three consecutive days of riding my legs were noticeably fatigued.

When I used to ride, I never followed any set plans or schedules unless I was planning on doing rides longer than 50 miles. My body was pretty good at telling me when to push harder or taper off a bit. I've never used a heart rate monitor, and I've never been much for racing, so I pretty much just went at a pace that felt right for me...which probably explains why I'm so damn slow now.

This time around, I have no idea how I should go about this. Although having fun is almost always paramount, the most important thing for me is to not overdo it and screw up any body parts that don't already hurt, but on the other hand I don't want to waste my time riding without seeing any real health benefits. The only real riding goal this year would be to maybe complete a 50 mile gravel ride before winter hits. I live in the Omaha area...an outstanding MUP system that's great for exercise and commuting but flat and pretty featureless. Our public roads are lousy for cycling, but there are a lot of nice gravel roads with enough hills to keep me challenged for as long as I want to ride. And I just like riding on the stuff for some reason (except the scary descents).

Has anyone been in a similar situation? How often, how long, how hard should I go at this? Are there any good training references out there? I appreciate any advice you guys and ladies might have. Thanks.
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Old 07-20-16, 11:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Grouch View Post
53-year old looking for some advice.
....... I have no idea how I should go about this. Although having fun is almost always paramount, the most important thing for me is to not overdo it and screw up any body parts that don't already hurt, but on the other hand I don't want to waste my time riding without seeing any real health benefits........
If you don't want to damage yourself... my best advice is be sure to stay hydrated and wear a cycling helmet.

Drink 1 ounce of liquid per 2 pounds of body weight (minimum) per day. A 180 pound man would consume 90 ounces of water/coffee/Gatorade.

All cyclists make mistakes. There is a decent change you'll touch the pavement this 1st season back. Generally it's no big deal. A road rash or black and blue mark. However bouncing you noggin on pavement can change your life... forever. Be sure to get a new helmet.

Then just ride..... ride lots (not my quote). Your body will reward your enjoyment.
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Old 07-21-16, 04:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Grouch View Post
53-year old looking for some advice.

Although I'm certainly not in cycling shape, I haven't lived a completely sedentary life since last riding in 2012. On the other hand, for the first time in my life I've noticed a little beer gut and love handles, and ...aerobically I'm not in superior shape either.

I started riding again about two weeks ago. Last week was my first full week,and I rode about 9 hours for the week (guesstimate) and 140 miles. Most of it was at my normal, plodding pace mixed with a few brief periods of increased intensity. One of the days left me feeling completely trashed after the ride while the other four rides were pretty much what I expected except that on Monday after three consecutive days of riding my legs were noticeably fatigued.

When I used to ride, I never followed any set plans or schedules unless I was planning on doing rides longer than 50 miles. My body was pretty good at telling me when to push harder or taper off a bit. I've never used a heart rate monitor, and I've never been much for racing, so I pretty much just went at a pace that felt right for me...which probably explains why I'm so damn slow now.

This time around, I have no idea how I should go about this. Although havingfun is almost always paramount, the most important thing for me is to not overdo it and screw up any body parts that don't already hurt, but on the other hand I don't want to waste my time riding without seeing any real health benefits. The only real riding goal this year would be to maybe complete a 50 mile gravel ride before winter hits…

Has anyone been in a similar situation? How often, how long, how hard should I go at this? Are there any good training references out there? I appreciate any advice you guys and ladies might have. Thanks.

FWIW, I recently posted about my self-developed,pragmatic training program based on "Relative Perceived Exertion" to a Training & Nutrition Forum thread, “commuter training.”
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
...last year I developed for myself myTime-restricted,Personally Ambitious, but Non-competitive Cyclist Training Routine.,”as discussed on this Fifty-Plus thread, “Riding versus Training” (also with other good training tips).
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
About two weeks ago I described a new training routine for myself combining a well-established Ten Week Century Training Schedule of daily mileage goals with a personalized intensity scale based on ”Relative Perceived Exertion (RPE).” My basic premise was that I wanted to get significantly fit, within a busy work/family time-crunched life, but not suffer so much that I would abandon the program.

I do have the advantages of a very nice minimum 14 mile one way commute that is easily extended; and a high end, very comfortable carbon fiber road bike that encourages riding…
I’m still riding it, and enjoying more than ever.
Currently,while mileage is still important to training, IMO, now I put much more emphasis on (comfortable but prolonged) intensity (Relative Perceived Exertion).




Last edited by Jim from Boston; 07-21-16 at 05:19 AM.
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Old 07-21-16, 05:56 AM
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If you actually were riding at an average speed of 15.5 mph and you considered it "plodding", it's because you aren't spinning fast enough. Especially if you've been off the bike for a while, you should always keep your spin above about 75 rpm.
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Old 07-21-16, 06:50 AM
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I'd probably look at 20 minute interval training in this situation with longer rides in between interval days, and sprint intervals one day a week if I was really gung-ho about it. Or maybe skip the sprint intervals entirely until after building up aerobically and then decide.
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Old 07-21-16, 07:24 AM
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Originally Posted by AlexCyclistRoch View Post
If you actually were riding at an average speed of 15.5 mph and you considered it "plodding", it's because you aren't spinning fast enough. Especially if you've been off the bike for a while, you should always keep your spin above about 75 rpm.
FYA, I posted about cadence in my above-mentioned training program, on a General Cycling Forum thread, “Cadence.”

Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
This year though, I decided to go for speed (intensity),and I use the semi-quantitative, standardized, but personally relavant system of (Borg’s) Relative Perceived Exertion (RPE), with my own particular adaptation.

Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
The RPE scale ranges from 6 to 17, with descriptions of the intensity. Multiply the RPE by 10 is the approximate heartrate. Jim's scale is the equivalent on a 0 to 100 scale, easier to think about:

RPE = 6, resting... Jim's scale = 10 to 20

RPE = 7, very, very light... Jim's scale = 20 to 30

RPE = 9, very light... Jim's scale = 30 to 40

11, fairly light...50 (my usual happy-go-lucky pace without thinking about it)

13, somewhat hard...60 (I have to focus to maintain)

15, hard...70 (I start breathing hard at about 30 seconds)

17, very hard (lactate threshold; breakpoint between hard but steady
breathing and labored with gasping)...80 (my predicted max HR)

19, very, very hard...90 to 100.
My basic training is to ride at my RPE of 50% for six miles to warm up, then cruise at an RPE of 60%, and do intervals (on hills) at 70%. I try to change gears to maintain a cadence of about 85-90 rpm on flats and rolling hills, and about 60 to 80 rpm on harder hills, to maintain my RPE. Shift up to higher gears as the cadence rises, and shift down as the RPE increases.

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 07-21-16 at 07:28 AM.
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Old 07-21-16, 07:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Grouch View Post
53-year old looking for some advice.

[T]he most important thing for me is to not overdo it and screw up any body parts that don't already hurt, but on the other hand I don't want to waste my time riding without seeing any real health benefits.
Whoa ... that's interesting perspective. For me, the health benefits are an inevitable consequence of riding for fun.

Don't forget the fun component. For me, any activity partaken purely for health benefits is one that will be abandoned as soon as the goal is achieved, and pretty soon, I'm right back to where I started or worse.
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Old 07-21-16, 08:50 AM
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Biker395 I think has the answer. For me also, the best exercise is the one that will be maintained.
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Old 07-21-16, 09:44 AM
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I'm 57,, Started just like you...

Get a Mountain bike, Get Out In the woods, your not gulping down car exhaust just fresh air, no noise,

It's Intense, It's hard, It will hurt, alot, But the Rewards,,oh my,, The 'Flow' Is,, nothing,,It's EVERYTHING !
God I love It so !

You've bled with worse, Come bleed with me
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Old 07-21-16, 11:23 AM
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I started riding again in my early 40s after quitting for a few years when our child was a baby and toddler. I also gained a lot of weight from a "sympathetic pregnancy" when my wife was expecting, but I didn't lose the weight like she did after our daughter was born.

My first year cycling again I rode about 1,200 miles from August through December. The next year, I rode more than 7,000 miles and ride even more now at age 62. My advice would be to increase your mileage slowly and pay close attention to bike fit. If something starts hurting -- like your knees -- take some rest and make sure that your bike is properly fit for you. Saddle placement, height as well as forward/back movement, is particularly important.

Cycling is a great exercise with minimal impacts on your body, if everything is adjusted properly, you don't crash, and you don't try to do too much too fast. However, you spin so many revolutions cycling that you can injure your knees if saddle placement is not right. I've also found it important to warm up by spinning at relatively low effort for several miles.
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Old 07-21-16, 07:44 PM
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Originally Posted by AlexCyclistRoch View Post
If you actually were riding at an average speed of 15.5 mph and you considered it "plodding", it's because you aren't spinning fast enough. Especially if you've been off the bike for a while, you should always keep your spin above about 75 rpm.
Believe me, I'm not grinding gears. One of the best pieces of advice when I first started riding road bikes was to keep my rpms at 90 when riding on flat/flattish roads. My new computer has a cadence feature, and I'm pretty good with staying between 85-95 rpm. When I say plodding, I mean I'm just slow at a steady pace even when spinning at a healthy rate. Right now I'm a little leery of trying to push a bigger gear at my normal cadence.

Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
I'd probably look at 20 minute interval training in this situation with longer rides in between interval days, and sprint intervals one day a week if I was really gung-ho about it. Or maybe skip the sprint intervals entirely until after building up aerobically and then decide.
I've never done proper intervals, because I don't really know how to do them. I'd try to do them and think to myself "Is this max effort? Do I need to go harder? What does harder even feel like? Harder gear? Easier gear and spin more? Should I be coughing up a lung at this point?" Maybe Jim's RPE would be helpful. When I wanted to do intervals or increase riding intensity in the past, I'd look for a few hills to climb (which I really enjoy). But I agree that they're probably the best way for me to improve my overall performance. Should I ride a bit more before even trying them (not sprints, just intervals)?

Originally Posted by Biker395 View Post
Whoa ... that's interesting perspective. For me, the health benefits are an inevitable consequence of riding for fun.

Don't forget the fun component. For me, any activity partaken purely for health benefits is one that will be abandoned as soon as the goal is achieved, and pretty soon, I'm right back to where I started or worse.
Agreed. My problem with a lot of activities is that I end up having so much fun that I wear myself out or end up hurting myself due to overuse (hip bursitis due to golf and hockey, elbow tendinitis, I think I broke my little finger back in March playing hockey...just haven't had it x-rayed...scored 8 goals in 4 games since the incident. Didn't want to mess with it. Still hurts a little.).

Originally Posted by osco53 View Post
Get a Mountain bike, Get Out In the woods, your not gulping down car exhaust just fresh air, no noise,

You've bled with worse, Come bleed with me
I've never owned one, but man I take a peek at them every time I'm in a shop. I love the woods and getting away from traffic...thus my attraction to gravel. She Who Must Be Obeyed would probably not be happy with another bike in the house. Something to think about for next year though. It will give me time to work on her as well.

Originally Posted by tarwheel View Post
My first year cycling again I rode about 1,200 miles from August through December. The next year, I rode more than 7,000 miles and ride even more now at age 62. My advice would be to increase your mileage slowly and pay close attention to bike fit. If something starts hurting -- like your knees -- take some rest and make sure that your bike is properly fit for you. Saddle placement, height as well as forward/back movement, is particularly important.

Cycling is a great exercise with minimal impacts on your body, if everything is adjusted properly, you don't crash, and you don't try to do too much too fast. However, you spin so many revolutions cycling that you can injure your knees if saddle placement is not right. I've also found it important to warm up by spinning at relatively low effort for several miles.
Very inspiring and great advice regarding fit and technique.

Thanks everyone. And yeah Jim, I definitely agree that mileage isn't the end-all for cycling fitness. The time component is also important.

I think I'll try to work into intervals at a reasonable rate on the "exercise days" (riding the MUPs) and head for the gravel/trails when I want to enjoy myself. At least I don't think I'm doing anything stupid or outside of my limits at this point.

Thanks again.
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Old 07-21-16, 09:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Grouch View Post
I've never done proper intervals, because I don't really know how to do them. I'd try to do them and think to myself "Is this max effort? Do I need to go harder? What does harder even feel like? Harder gear? Easier gear and spin more? Should I be coughing up a lung at this point?" Maybe Jim's RPE would be helpful. When I wanted to do intervals or increase riding intensity in the past, I'd look for a few hills to climb (which I really enjoy). But I agree that they're probably the best way for me to improve my overall performance. Should I ride a bit more before even trying them (not sprints, just intervals)?
I don't see why you should need to ride more first, you're already doing 140 miles a week which is nothing to scoff at.
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Old 07-21-16, 10:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Biker395 View Post
Whoa ... that's interesting perspective. For me, the health benefits are an inevitable consequence of riding for fun.

Don't forget the fun component. For me, any activity partaken purely for health benefits is one that will be abandoned as soon as the goal is achieved, and pretty soon, I'm right back to where I started or worse.
I entirely agreed, but add that I don't think bike riding will provide all the health benefits you (OP) hope to achieve anyway. I appreciate I might be a minority opinion, but sitting on you butt for 3 hours spinning your legs in the same motion, using the same muscles to fatigue -- what do you think you get? Hungry perhaps? Ride for fun, but it you are looking for serious cardio development or strength development you may want to look at other activities.

I ride for fun.
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Old 07-21-16, 10:15 PM
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I started riding again at 50. My method was to get on the bike and ride away from home until I got tired. Then I rode back. This program led to some interesting experiences, but hey, if you're not failing, you're not learning. I had a lot of fun anyway. It took me two years to work up to riding my first double century on a wobbly 80's 6-speed bike. I didn't start really training until years later because at first just riding the bike is all the training you need or can absorb.

Keep track of your miles per week and very gradually, increase them.

Back then, my feelings of relative importance were, IIRC:
1) Proper clothes, because if you're not comfortable, you won't be riding far.
2) The right on-bike food because if you don't eat right, see above.
3) Real, good fitting bike shoes with clipless pedals. I started with $60 MTB shoes and later jumped to Sidi - same pedals. Because with real shoes and pedals you can put down some power. Otherwise, not so much.
4) Decent bike. Absolutely the last thing on the list. You can ride anything long distances. Money doesn't buy much speed. I started with a $120 used bike. Worked great.

Also, if you need to, take a bike maintenance class. Work on your own bike as much as possible without needing a lot of special tools. I don't install headsets or bottom brackets. Everything else I do.
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Old 07-22-16, 04:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Grouch View Post
Believe me, I'm not grinding gears. One of the best pieces of advice when I first started riding road bikes was to keep my rpms at 90 when riding on flat/flattish roads. My new computer has a cadence feature, and I'm pretty good with staying between 85-95 rpm. When I say plodding, I mean I'm just slow at a steady pace even when spinning at a healthy rate. Right now I'm a little leery of trying to push a bigger gear at my normal cadence…
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
… I try to change gears to maintain a cadence of about 85-90 rpm on flats and rolling hills, and about 60 to 80 rpm on harder hills, to maintain my RPE. Shift up to higher gears as the cadence rises, and shift down as the RPE increases.
And yeah Jim, I definitely agree that mileage isn't the end-all for cycling fitness. The time component is also important.

I think I'll try to work into intervals at a reasonable rate on the"exercise days" (riding the MUPs) and head for the gravel/trails whenI want to enjoy myself. At least I don't think I'm doing anything stupid or outside of my limits at this point.

FYA, As a “Time-restricted, Personally Ambitious, but Non-competitive Cyclist,” I totally agree with this comment by @tsl,the commuter maven of the Fifty-Plus crowd, about optimal mileage:

Originally Posted by tsl View Post
…I was concerned about getting decent miles in. This is the time of year when I'd take my 17-mile long loop to work, and a 13-mile cut of it coming home. It's not that I chase miles for the sake of numbers. It takes me 50 miles a week just to feel good and normal, I feel fantastic over 100 miles a week, and like Superman over 150
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I particularly agree with your assessment of weekly mileage, though at over 150 miles per week, I call it hyper-fit.
Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
I don't see why you [@Grouch] should need to ride more first, you're already doing 140 miles a week which is nothing to scoff at.



Last edited by Jim from Boston; 07-22-16 at 04:18 AM.
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Old 07-22-16, 04:17 AM
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Old 07-22-16, 07:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
FYA, As a “Time-restricted, Personally Ambitious, but Non-competitive Cyclist,” I totally agree with this comment by @tsl,the commuter maven of the Fifty-Plus crowd, about optimal mileage:


Originally Posted by tsl View Post
…I was concerned about getting decent miles in. This is the time of year when I'd take my 17-mile long loop to work, and a 13-mile cut of it coming home. It's not that I chase miles for the sake of numbers. It takes me 50 miles a week just to feel good and normal, I feel fantastic over 100 miles a week, and like Superman over 150…
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I particularly agree with your assessment of weekly mileage, though at over 150 miles per week, I call it hyper-fit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
I don't see why you [@Grouch] should need to ride more first, you're already doing 140 miles a week which is nothing to scoff at.
At last I'm enshrined in a Jim from Boston quote chain, feels like the big time! Thank you.

But if you want to ride more miles, don't let us discourage you. Ride on.
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Old 07-22-16, 07:43 AM
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One more piece of advice is to drink plenty of fluids. When I started riding again in my 40s, I would usually carry just one water bottle and often didn't finish it off. I didn't drink until I felt real thirsty. Then I got a kidney stone, an experience I don't want to repeat. My doctor told that the best way to prevent a recurrence was to always drink plenty of fluids. When riding, I try to finish a water bottle at least every 20 miles or so.
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Old 07-22-16, 09:20 AM
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Old 07-22-16, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by FrenchFit View Post
I entirely agreed, but add that I don't think bike riding will provide all the health benefits you (OP) hope to achieve anyway. I appreciate I might be a minority opinion, but sitting on you butt for 3 hours spinning your legs in the same motion, using the same muscles to fatigue -- what do you think you get? Hungry perhaps? Ride for fun, but it you are looking for serious cardio development or strength development you may want to look at other activities.

I ride for fun.
I dunno ... that all depends on how and where you ride.

As for cardio, I guarantee that riding a bike at an aerobic and occasionally anerobic pace will do wonders for cardio development.

As for strength, perhaps not. But how much exercise you get out of riding a bike depends on how you ride it. I ride up a lot of hills, and enjoy standing up on the bike quite a bit (some of my bikes require that, as they don't have serious climbing gears). Standing while pedaling exercises a lot of other muscles, including the arms, chest, back, and core.
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Old 07-22-16, 11:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Biker395 View Post
I dunno ... that all depends on how and where you ride.

As for cardio, I guarantee that riding a bike at an aerobic and occasionally anerobic pace will do wonders for cardio development.

As for strength, perhaps not. But how much exercise you get out of riding a bike depends on how you ride it. I ride up a lot of hills, and enjoy standing up on the bike quite a bit (some of my bikes require that, as they don't have serious climbing gears). Standing while pedaling exercises a lot of other muscles, including the arms, chest, back, and core.
Mountain biking, yeah. I've had my butt kicked on the hills more times than I'd like to admit. On the road, seems like it's spin up to 20+ and then slow down in 20 secs for traffic, stop lights, bad road, whatever. Overall, I'd wager that if you gave the average cyclist a fit test, i.e. running, push-ups, pull-ups, weight work, swimming, even yoga they'd be average at best. But..there are obviously going to be exceptions.
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Old 07-22-16, 11:35 AM
  #22  
Biker395 
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Originally Posted by FrenchFit View Post
Mountain biking, yeah. I've had my butt kicked on the hills more times than I'd like to admit. On the road, seems like it's spin up to 20+ and then slow down in 20 secs for traffic, stop lights, bad road, whatever. Overall, I'd wager that if you gave the average cyclist a fit test, i.e. running, push-ups, pull-ups, weight work, swimming, even yoga they'd be average at best. But..there are obviously going to be exceptions.
What's this running you speak of? My knees are already aching at the thought of it.
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Old 07-22-16, 11:42 AM
  #23  
Jim from Boston
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Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
At last I'm enshrined in a Jim from Boston quote chain, feels like the big time! Thank you…

Hey, thanks for your acknowledgement, @wphamilton.By way of explanation (to our OP, et al) here’s my Annual Explanation of my Posting Philosophy and Style.

Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Thanks for your quote and reading my post…My nested quotes are meant to be read in a linear array, as if a conversation with one person speaking (posting) followed by another, then maybe another one or two.

“I said, “then I said, “as @turbo1889 said, “and then I commented

Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Regards however to my specific style using the quote function, I have described it in previous Forum posts:

Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
…Last year I came upon a post that to me embodied the communication style that I like about BF. In response to a long quote, turbo1889 wrote [not to me]:

Originally Posted by turbo1889 View Post
First of all you have no need to apologize for a lengthy post, least of all to me of all people. Part of the reason I like forums as opposed to other forms of written communal internet forms is because I consider it the "long deep conversation format" rather then the quick short snappy sound bite like format like twitter and such.
So when I nest quotes, I feel I’m emulating a conversation…”He said," then “You said," then “I said, and now I’m saying…” I leave my quotes as links to identify the author, and if anyone is interested in reading further, or verifying those quotes, they can easily be followed right from the post…

I use ellipses...to eliminate as much as possible, and still leave the context of the quote comprehensible; and I bold key words and phrases to emphasize the core content of the discussion
Anything outside a quote box (in the linear array) is my current post.

BTW by way of further explanation, I like to make my posts self-explanatory, as if someone reading from the last post in a thread forward could understand the context of my post, so I include quotes expressing the entire “conversation.” Often for reference I'll even include the title of the thread itself. If I go back to review the post (to find a specific quote by myself or others), I also will recognize the context.

Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Posting has become an avocation for me. Since my job requires writing formal reports, with legal implications, I consider myself a “wordsmith,” and beside the exchange of information and ideas [and chit-chat], I enjoy the mechanics of writing, such as grammar, composition , style, etc. for that additional mental stimulation.

So with my experiences in cycling, and my frequent posting over the years, if I have replied on a recurrent topic, written to my satisfaction, I’ll just quote it. A further challenge then becomes finding the post.

Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
…I have been an avid cyclist, as a lifestyle since about 1972…I happened serendipitously on Bike Forums in 2008, and it was frankly incredible to find a community that shared so many concerns I had kept to myself as a lone cyclist.

What I have gotten directly from BF [include]…the opportunity to post and literally "journal" my thoughts and activities about cycling and lifestyle (even if nobody else reads them), but which I wouldn't write down otherwise.
This reply is written, not just for you, [@wp], but in case anybody else is curious.

Originally Posted by Roody View Post
…BTW, off-topic, I have often noticed your clever and helpful use of the forum's quote function. Along with your clear writing style, it makes your posts a delight to read

Originally Posted by yankeefan View Post
…Hey Jim, yeah I can never forget your trademark style of nested quotes.

Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
you have mad quotation skills

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 07-22-16 at 01:20 PM.
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Old 07-22-16, 01:27 PM
  #24  
osco53
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"She Who Must Be Obeyed",,, what ?

Your kidding right ?

I wear the pants In MY house, I call the shots,,,wait a sec, ok ok I wear the spandex and she wears the pants..


I hear ya brother I hear ya
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Old 07-22-16, 03:25 PM
  #25  
chinarider
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I'd be careful about too much too soon. 140 miles in the first full week seems like a bit much to me when you haven't ridden in 4 years. It may not feel too hard, but I fear you may be asking for injury. You may not want to hear it, but I'd back off to maybe half that and give yourself a few weeks ( or more) to work back up to it. Even though you've ridden before, you should pretty much consider yourself a new rider. It's a common trap for those new to an activity to go all gung ho and then get hurt and/or burnt out and wind up dropping out. There's not rush. Even giving yourself some time to ease into it as I suggest, there'e is plenty of time to be ready for a 50 miler before winter. You win by sticking to it long term.

Last edited by chinarider; 07-22-16 at 03:34 PM.
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