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-   -   Have you ridden a race bike? (https://www.bikeforums.net/fifty-plus-50/1084067-have-you-ridden-race-bike.html)

BikeArkansas 10-13-16 03:53 PM

Have you ridden a race bike?
 
Just curious how many of the 50+ men and women have ridden a true race bike. Lets say less than 17#, set up agressive with a ride of at least 25 miles (not just around the parking lot or block). Of course a good fit would make a difference as far as enjoying a race bike, as it is normally not a forgiving type ride. Did you find it much easier to climb, quicker to handle, harsh ride? What did you decide - Loved it, Hated it, bought one or will never get on another bike like that again?

Bandera 10-13-16 03:59 PM

1 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by BikeArkansas (Post 19121118)
Just curious how many of the 50+ men and women have ridden a true race bike.

I competed in Track, Road, Cyclo Cross and MTB racing.
So Yes I have on several flavors thereof.
Still own and ride some of them, what's not to like?

-Bandera

deacon mark 10-13-16 04:08 PM

I ride a race bike everyday I ride it is not suppose to be painful. The pain comes in with the increased effort and output. To make an analogy , I can use racing flats to run a 5k and they do not hurt more than my regular training shoes the issue is I am running harder to that is the difficult part.

79pmooney 10-13-16 04:08 PM

Quote "Lets say less than 17#, set up agressive with a ride of at least 25 miles (not just around the parking lot or block)."

You forget some of us actually raced. Back when 17 pound bikes didn't exist. Late '70s. My bike probably weighed 21 pounds. And yes, it was a pure racing bike. Light sew-up wheels, very quick steering. Over two years I put 9000 miles on it, raced it, rode it on many long rides.

It was a race bike only. Not a weekend cruiser. It took me a month every spring to get confident riding it one-handed, longer to go no-hands. But threading the needle to get through a crash that was happening all around me- for that it was superb. A week after I rode my last race, I went to Peter Mooney to order a bike with similar fit, but that was a do everything bike, not a race bike. The race bike got a few more rides before I sold it. Sad but no regrets.

Ben

bbbean 10-13-16 04:08 PM

Go to virtually any race, and you'll find lots of 50+ riders on race bikes. If you want to ride fast, it only makes sense to ride a bike designed for riding fast. I love my Propel, and find it both comfortable and fast. I don't know anyone who races a bike they don't find comfortable.

BB

BikeArkansas 10-13-16 04:10 PM


Originally Posted by Bandera (Post 19121133)
I competed in Track, Road, Cyclo Cross and MTB racing.
So Yes I have on several flavors thereof.
Still own and ride some of them, what's not to like?

-Bandera

Beautiful bike.

Carbonfiberboy 10-13-16 04:19 PM

My everyday bike is a race bike, same frame Lance rode to his first TdF victory in '99. Different size, though. My longest 1-day ride on that bike is 400k or 250 miles. My fastest 400k was just under 15 hours. I was in my early 60's. I run slammed -17 stems on all my bikes. Grand Tour bikes are great. They go where they're pointed and climb very well. This bike is carbon and is very comfortable with 23mm tires.

DiabloScott 10-13-16 04:28 PM

I think it was about 21 pounds, but yeah.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/3Y...=w1427-h951-no


... and I looked GOOD doing it. :)

Bandera 10-13-16 04:29 PM


Originally Posted by BikeArkansas (Post 19121154)
Beautiful bike.

Thank you, it's keeper w/ good results in it's past.

The idea of "normally not a forgiving type ride" won't come from the experienced (ex)-racers in the sub-forum.

A properly fitted race bike has to be comfortable enough to put in the long hours, big miles in all conditions as well as maximizing hard efforts in climbs/sprints while offering precise control for racing.

Adaptation to the machine, significant seat time, pack skills, structured training and race experience might well be required to appreciate a good race bikes' actual qualities.

-Bandera

CliffordK 10-13-16 04:36 PM

Hmmm...

My Colnago C-40 comes in between 17 and 18 lbs... and I absolutely love it, although some racers might consider it stoneage vintage. I've made a few changes, so I should probably weigh it again.

Everything about it just feels right. I did the custom build to my desires.

It is light and responsive. Brakes are an order of magnitude better than many others I've used.

The old Colnago Super could also be classified as a racing bike, and I've put many miles on it over the years, but it isn't "modern" by any stretch.

Barrettscv 10-13-16 05:19 PM

I have ridden several racebikes, mostly classic models, but modern carbon models also. A great frame accelerates quickly, climbs without swaying, holds speed easily, and is stable on descents.

This 1988 Eddy Merckx is a response and remarkable ride. It really was an advancement over prior bikes and is still capable of staying with many of the expensive road bike seen in the showroom today.


http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/l...pssebnpedf.jpg

http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/l...psmxtm56j4.jpg

http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/l...pskry9eyil.jpg

http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/l...psgcag0qjy.jpg

http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/l...psmemg496i.jpg

http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/l...ps1dst210a.jpg

TejanoTrackie 10-13-16 05:50 PM

I raced on the road and did a lot of long fast touring rides on a road racing style bike. I still ride that style of bike and the only change is that now my riding position is more upright. Provided the bike fits you properly and you get a good saddle that fits your anatomy, a road racing bike can be very comfortable. My newest road bike has a full carbon fiber frame, and it has both a very smooth and responsive ride. As long as you don't overinflate the tires, the ride will not be harsh.

GeneO 10-13-16 05:53 PM

You are implying road, but here is an 18.5 lb trail bike I find a pleasure to ride. It is fast, handles well and is very comfortable on gravelly and dirt trails. I actually commute my 32 mi RT to work on it. Before that I rode a 20 lb Al cyclocross race bike. I also do 50-70 mi trail rides on them.


https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-...rcvzqfh-XL.jpg

NealH 10-13-16 06:11 PM

The Diverge is a really nice bike. I have been riding a S-Works Tarmac for 6 years now, and have about 65k miles on it. I wouldn't ride anything else except maybe a Diverge. Steel....forget it.

Miami Biker 10-13-16 06:45 PM

Ride a Cervelo R5 with Zipp 202s at 25mm. Very light and fast and extremely comfortable.

Bike can do a lot more than me so I know the equipment is not holding me back.

I'm 71 and today we rode 30 miles averaging 19+ MPH with stretches of 24-26 and my top speed was 28.3.

On Saturdays usually ride 52 to 62 or 71 miles. Total rides average 18-20 MPH depending on routes and stop signs or lights. And yes quite comfortable.

Did have a custom fitting and that helps a lot. Also have a power meter last few months to measure progress FWIW.

Don't think racing configuration and comfort are incompatible, if you are flexible, have a good fitting and put in the time to train your body along with nutrition and post ride ministrations.

GeneO 10-13-16 07:09 PM


Originally Posted by NealH (Post 19121362)
The Diverge is a really nice bike. I have been riding a S-Works Tarmac for 6 years now, and have about 65k miles on it. I wouldn't ride anything else except maybe a Diverge. Steel....forget it.

That's some fantastic mileage.

I really like it (Diverge) except for the SCS thingy. The roads around here are too treacherous and there are hundreds of miles of rails to trails and prairie path. I think if I were more rural I would get a Roubaix, hell I might still as the 2017 looks a bit plush. If I can convince my wife, but it will have to wait as I have only put about 1300 mi on the Diverge since I got it in July. :p

@Miami, hope I am still plugging away at 71 (62 here).

02Giant 10-13-16 07:12 PM


Originally Posted by DiabloScott (Post 19121185)
I think it was about 21 pounds, but yeah.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/3Y...=w1427-h951-no


... and I looked GOOD doing it. :)

The only rider in the group with their inside pedal down in a turn.

Save

Bmach 10-13-16 07:31 PM

I ride an Evo fits me and rides as good as my Synaspe. I'm 61, rides are usually between 30-75 miles.

canklecat 10-13-16 07:37 PM

I haven't ridden anything that would be considered a state of the art race bike by current standards. I have ridden bikes that would have been state of the art 20-30 years ago, and would still be competitive in local crits.

I wouldn't buy one now. Chronic and occasionally severe pain from an old neck injury limits me to bikes with bars slightly above saddle height. I can't crane my neck upward at all, and I'm not comfortable with the idea of riding drops without being able to look up often. Even on a quiet rural road there are too many things that can go sideways quickly: a new bit of debris, some roadkill, an animal darting across the path.

One of my bikes is a comfy hybrid with spring suspension fork and flat bars set about 2" above saddle height. The other is a 1990s mountain bike that I'm gradually hybridizing, with slight riser bars near saddle height. I'm gonna raise those soon -- after a few weeks of riding I can tell it's still a bit low for comfortable rides longer than 40 miles, and I'm hoping to ride a solo non-organized century on it before the end of the year.

But I might rent one of the carbon frame road bikes from a local shop and try it for a day just for fun.

OldsCOOL 10-13-16 07:47 PM

My bikes are classic/vintage racers (see avatar list, minus the Fuji). The Cannondale Criterium is hardcore. The Colnago was ridden by a mid in his senior year ('78) and set a state record. The '86 Trek 760 Pro Series is race bred and built. I ride them hard and for speed but it's the C-dale that gets the majority of my time. It's the fit and geometry that makes the Criterium bike my favorite. The racey feel is hard to describe. I cant ride it casually like the other bikes. When my feet feel the snug straps my pulse quickens, my eyesight sharpens and it's off to the hills. Fit and feel is everything.

BikeArkansas 10-13-16 09:02 PM

Very interesting how many rode the steel race bikes. I rode a road bike for the first time 10 years ago, at age 57 and have tried many road bikes during that time. I have learned to like the carbon fiber frame. I do have a steel road bike that is especially good on flats and easy rollers. When it comes to a course with some climbs, I go right back to the CF. I have been told I do not know how to use the flex of the steel bike on climbs. I just agree that I do not understand the concept, and it is most likely I am too old and onery to learn it.

DiabloScott 10-13-16 09:46 PM


Originally Posted by 02Giant (Post 19121473)
The only rider in the group with their inside pedal down in a turn.


That's not a turn... THIS is a turn.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/da...=w1231-h950-no

MinnMan 10-13-16 10:15 PM

Obviously, lots of us ride race bikes with aggressive geometries. They do not have harsh rides and, if they fit you and if you have the back and the core strength to hold the aggressive position, they are dreamy.

We can all trot out our "yes, I do"s, but I think the answer to the OPs underlying implied question is that he needs to go test ride one and find out how it feels to him to ride a tight racing machine. I love mine.

woodcraft 10-13-16 10:24 PM

2 Attachment(s)
My every day ride (well, weekly). 15 lbs. Three double centuries this year.


Winter wheels. Usually has 35 or 60 mm carbon rims on it.



The current look.

Wildwood 10-14-16 03:31 AM

I would say, yes.
Carbon and Ti frames with Campy 10speed, + Vintage steel


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