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58 and haven't ridden since the 70's

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58 and haven't ridden since the 70's

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Old 03-16-17, 09:46 PM
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bambam900
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58 and haven't ridden since the 70's

Hi Fifty Plus club.

RonH suggested I visit here.

I just picked up my first bike for many years. I used to ride a nice Raleigh road bike daily in London in the 70s and am amazed at how far bikes have come since then. My new bike is a Specialized Diverge A1 and it is so incredibly light and the frame is so stiff. I feel like I should be treating it with a lot of respect as the bike seems to respond to inputs so directly. I pedal, it moves, no flex, barely any inertia - it's a whole new world.
Exciting. I hope to be putting many miles in and getting, and staying fit!

Any tips for a new old timer?

Last edited by bambam900; 03-16-17 at 09:47 PM. Reason: Typo + question added!
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Old 03-16-17, 09:48 PM
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Welcome back. I started a few years back at 55, having not ridden since the 70s. And I'm very glad I did. But I wanted to really relive my youth, so I'm riding a vintage Raleigh.
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Old 03-16-17, 11:31 PM
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A lot of the older new riders get excited and overdo it, and hurt themselves or crash. Don't overdo it, and don't crash
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Old 03-17-17, 12:16 AM
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I'm also 58, rode in the 70s, started back on the bike in 2013. A big change from the 70s is the prevelance of helmets. There is a whole separate thread on BF to argue about them. I wear one now, I did not in the 70s.

Give your body time to adapt. I went from 5 mile rides to 45 in three months, probably pushed a bit too fast and had some knee pains. All resolved now with more time on the bike. Get a bike fitting done if you have not. Your 58 year old body will appreciate it. Have fun!
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Old 03-17-17, 12:24 AM
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Be careful with road safety. Start with bike paths, and tranquil neighborhood streets before going out and venturing onto the busy roads.

Buy a good helmet, even if yours from 40 years ago is still good.
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Old 03-17-17, 12:25 AM
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Welcome! I just turned 59. I rode a Raleigh Supercourse in the mid-70s to 80s. I rode sporadically in the 90s, picked up a 1987 Raleigh in the early 2000s, upgraded it two years ago to modern Campy 10 spd. I retired in 2013, and got back into riding regularly again.

I'm into finding premium, classically styled frames (read: horizontal TT), and upgrading them with modern drivetrains to be regular riders. I have 3 like this, and working on my 4th (the old N+1 syndrome).

Ease yourself back into it gradually, take it easy at first. Make sure your bike fits so that your knees and other moving parts don't suffer unnecessarily.

Do it for the fun of it.
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Old 03-17-17, 12:58 AM
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Thanks for the kind welcome messages and advice everyone. I'll be taking it easy for sure. I had some back issues last year so I am careful in that respect. The shop I got my new bike from gave me a full fitting - it was quite a thing: very thorough and scientific.
Looks like I found the right place to begin my new adventure.
Cheers!
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Old 03-17-17, 02:39 AM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
Be careful with road safety. Start with bike paths, and tranquil neighborhood streets before going out and venturing onto the busy roads.

Buy a good helmet, even if yours from 40 years ago is still good.
Great advice - I am close to some great bike paths but also some busy streets, so I'll be erring on the side of caution. Bike helmets weren't a thing when I last rode, but I do have a one now and I get that it's a sensible precaution. I got a hi viz one - I don't want be that bloke that the driver didn't see.
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Old 03-17-17, 02:52 AM
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Originally Posted by jon c. View Post
Welcome back. I started a few years back at 55, having not ridden since the 70s. And I'm very glad I did. But I wanted to really relive my youth, so I'm riding a vintage Raleigh.
I loved the Raleigh touring bike I rode, fabulous bike and utterly reliable. But looking back, I cannot quite understand how I survived those commutes across London.. It's a mystery.
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Old 03-17-17, 02:54 AM
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Originally Posted by DiabloScott View Post
A lot of the older new riders get excited and overdo it, and hurt themselves or crash. Don't overdo it, and don't crash
Okay, I got that. No crashing.
I can see how it'd be easy to get overexcited though. But I won't. And no crashing.
Cheers.
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Old 03-17-17, 02:57 AM
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Originally Posted by jimincalif View Post
I'm also 58, rode in the 70s, started back on the bike in 2013. A big change from the 70s is the prevelance of helmets. There is a whole separate thread on BF to argue about them. I wear one now, I did not in the 70s.

Give your body time to adapt. I went from 5 mile rides to 45 in three months, probably pushed a bit too fast and had some knee pains. All resolved now with more time on the bike. Get a bike fitting done if you have not. Your 58 year old body will appreciate it. Have fun!
Yes, I don't think anybody wore bike helmets back then. I'd have felt daft.
I'd feel weird NOT wearing one these days though. Stronger survival sense maybe.
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Old 03-17-17, 03:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Warren128 View Post
Ease yourself back into it gradually, take it easy at first. Make sure your bike fits so that your knees and other moving parts don't suffer unnecessarily.

Do it for the fun of it.
My bike shop took great pains to get me on a bike that fits well. 30 minute session on the fit bike and custom ordered bike and seat post. They talked me out of an out and out road bike due to the more aggressive ergos, which I'm thankful for. I was impressed by the experience and intend to do my part, which is to take it slowly at first, as you suggest.
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Old 03-17-17, 04:14 AM
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Originally Posted by bambam900 View Post
The shop I got my new bike from gave me a full fitting - it was quite a thing: very thorough and scientific.

There's a saying that goes:"logic is a way of going wrong with confidence".


Fit calculators and the various systems will work for many, and provide a good starting point for the rest.


But remember that your body has the power to veto any chart or equation based bike fit.


The trick for a new rider is to know what'll go away with increased experience/fitness, and what'll stay wrong.


I've got restricted flexibility in my lower back.
It's not immediately visible, as I'm over-flexible higher up.


But for extended rides, I can't use bikes that are fitted "by the book".


I need to use shorter stems, or bikes with shorter top tubes, to remain reasonably comfortable.
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Old 03-17-17, 05:59 AM
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Welcome back to cycling. The older you get the harder it is to take off winter fat if you live in the snow belt. For years I have been able to take off approx 15 pounds I have gained over the winter. However this year I have kept that down to only a 5 pound gain, and will be interested to see where I end up at the end of the summer riding season.

One more thing, you have made a good move. In the later years if you set, you rust. As I have posted many times, I refer to my bent and trike as my fountain of youth machines!!!!!!
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Old 03-17-17, 07:00 AM
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58 and haven't ridden since the 70's
Originally Posted by bambam900 View Post
Hi Fifty Plus club.

RonH suggested I visit here.

I just picked up my first bike for many years. I used to ride a nice Raleigh road bike daily in London in the 70s and am amazed at how far bikes have come since then. My new bike is a Specialized Diverge A1 and it is so incredibly light and the frame is so stiff. I feel like I should be treating it with a lot of respect as the bike seems to respond to inputs so directly. I pedal, it moves, no flex, barely any inertia - it's a whole new world.

Exciting. I hope to be putting many miles in and getting, and staying fit!

Any tips for a new old timer?
Dittoes to all the above replies. I too got my start in a cycling lifestyle in the 1970’s.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
...I stumbled upon this Forum from another totally unrelated Blog and I was quite impressed at the volume of activity and range of interests. Back in the 60’s in the Motor City, I had an “English Racer,’ and longed to tour at about age 14,but then joined the car culture. In Ann Arbor MI in the 70’s I really realized the utility of bicycles for commuting, and began touring on a five-speed Schwinn Suburban, but soon bought a Mercier as did my girlfriend-later my wife. We toured in Michigan and Ontario.

In 1977 we moved to Boston on our bikes, as a bicycling honeymoon from Los Angeles to Washington, DC and then took the train up to Boston...
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
… I happened serendipitously on Bike Forums in 2008, and it was frankly incredible to find a community that shared so many concerns I had kept to myself as a lone cyclist.
If I had to suggest a single tip, it would be wear a rearview mirror.

However, I replied in particular to your ownership of a Specialized Diverge (A1). I don’t know where that stands in the Diverge model line, but I recently bought an aluminum Diverge Elite as my quality “beater bike.” It was a great buy, and I enjoy riding it so much more that my former beater Cannondale MTB, but FYA I did post a comparison with my carbon fiber Specialized S-Works:
Originally Posted by Jim fromBoston View Post
…The ride and shifting of the Diverge is as smooth as the S-Works, but the feel is more ”solid,” with 30 C tires. I describe the feel of the S-Works as “ethereal.”…

I liken my three bikes to a Lamborghini, a Lexus, and a Humvee.

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Old 03-17-17, 07:04 AM
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welcome. 58 stinks, doesn't it? miss the '70s. good luck & have fun!
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Old 03-17-17, 07:38 AM
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Welcome back to the joy of being free and outdoors. Dont let this thing get OCD complicated, just put your butt on the seat and ride. The memories will propel you. I like your comment on stiff and light frames. I ride an '88 Cannondale Crierium that needs special attention but rewards me nicely when I ride it aggressively.
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Old 03-17-17, 07:40 AM
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Originally Posted by jon c. View Post
Welcome back. I started a few years back at 55, having not ridden since the 70s. And I'm very glad I did. But I wanted to really relive my youth, so I'm riding a vintage Raleigh.
I am doing the same.
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Old 03-17-17, 08:34 AM
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I'm 59. I rode a Raleigh Supercourse until it was stolen in 1980, then a Fuji Royale, then a Del Rey. I started riding again in 2012 with the Del Rey, but became enamored by the jazzy new carbon fiber endurance bikes, so naturally I went overboard and purchased two. My aging body thanks me for it and I love riding them.

Start slow - enjoy the ride - and wear a helmet. Funny how most of us didn't even think about them in our youth. After seeing the aftermath of two crashes - one with and one without - I won't set butt on a bike without one.
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Old 03-17-17, 02:14 PM
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Originally Posted by bambam900 View Post
Great advice - I am close to some great bike paths but also some busy streets, so I'll be erring on the side of caution. Bike helmets weren't a thing when I last rode, but I do have a one now and I get that it's a sensible precaution. I got a hi viz one - I don't want be that bloke that the driver didn't see.
Bike helmets have been around for a very long time.

They've just changed a little bit.

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Old 03-17-17, 09:54 PM
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Originally Posted by rydabent View Post
Welcome back to cycling. The older you get the harder it is to take off winter fat if you live in the snow belt. For years I have been able to take off approx 15 pounds I have gained over the winter. However this year I have kept that down to only a 5 pound gain, and will be interested to see where I end up at the end of the summer riding season.

One more thing, you have made a good move. In the later years if you set, you rust. As I have posted many times, I refer to my bent and trike as my fountain of youth machines!!!!!!
Agreed - very hard to slim down as you get older. I'll be happy to lose an inch off my waist, but even if that doesn't happen at least I know my heart will be healthier.
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Old 03-17-17, 09:56 PM
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Originally Posted by dabac View Post
The trick for a new rider is to know what'll go away with increased experience/fitness, and what'll stay wrong.
.
Right on - I'll watch out for that - the bike shop seem happy to work with me if any adjustments are needed.
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Old 03-17-17, 09:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
If I had to suggest a single tip, it would be wear a rearview mirror.
However, I replied in particular to your ownership of a Specialized Diverge (A1). I don’t know where that stands in the Diverge model line, but I recently bought an aluminum Diverge Elite as my quality “beater bike.”
Great idea, one of the hardest things I noticed was twisting around to look behind me.
The Diverge A1 is the entry level Diverge. Aluminium frame, carbon fork and Claris groupset. What . . . . $900 entry level bike??? Regardless, I am thrilled to death with it.
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Old 03-17-17, 10:01 PM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
58 stinks, doesn't it?
Well, not as bad as the alternative . . . .
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Old 03-17-17, 10:02 PM
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Originally Posted by OldsCOOL View Post
Welcome back to the joy of being free and outdoors. Dont let this thing get OCD complicated, just put your butt on the seat and ride. The memories will propel you. I like your comment on stiff and light frames. I ride an '88 Cannondale Crierium that needs special attention but rewards me nicely when I ride it aggressively.

I have my motorcycle parked eagerly waiting for spring as always this time of year . . I have a feeling it may have to stay parked for a while

Last edited by bambam900; 03-17-17 at 10:04 PM. Reason: added words
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