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I took my longest ride last Saturday

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I took my longest ride last Saturday

Old 05-23-17, 09:21 AM
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I took my longest ride last Saturday

35 miles. This is my first season riding so I've got about three months experience. Previous personal best was 25 miles, taken earlier this month. Still a long way to go to get to the century mark.

I was pretty well used up at the end of the 35 miles. At the end on level ground the best speed I could manage was 10 mph. When I got off the bike, my legs felt like they were made of wood.

I've got new respect for you guys that can do a century.
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Old 05-23-17, 09:24 AM
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good job! feels good to go longer....next stop 45 miles!
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Old 05-23-17, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Tony_G
35 miles. This is my first season riding so I've got about three months experience. Previous personal best was 25 miles, taken earlier this month. Still a long way to go to get to the century mark.

I was pretty well used up at the end of the 35 miles. At the end on level ground the best speed I could manage was 10 mph. When I got off the bike, my legs felt like they were made of wood.

I've got new respect for you guys that can do a century.
Just keep at it. You'd be surprised how quickly your body adapts.

Years ago, I found myself off the bike for an extended period of time ... I think it was because of a hand fracture. Until then, I was doing the usual ... riding 35 miles a day to work and back and doing climbing centuries or near centuries on weekends, with an occasional double century.

On my first day back to riding, I was flippin exhausted by the time I got home. It was a voting day, and the polling place was about 1/2 block up from my house and maybe a 20 foot climb. I seriously debated whether it was worth riding that extra 1/2 block.

The key ... especially for us older folks ... is to keep it up. Consistency is king.
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Old 05-23-17, 09:40 AM
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well done, you! like breaking the sound barrier ... a little further ea ride

but that's a good distance for a regular route. I have a cpl (road bike rides) that are approx 20 miles, & others approx 30 miles. not saying you shouldn't try to ride further, just that, when you go out for a ride what are you prepared for? 2 hours? 3? 4? more? what have you eaten in preparation? what are you bringing with you? what can you buy if you stop at the halfway point?

personally, when I'm out for a long time I like to stop at the 1/2 way mark & rest a little & eat something good. 2 - 4 hours is enough time for me away from my car or home

so, that's a great accomplishment but as a new rider you shouldn't feel stressed about riding longer & longer & longer. unless you want to of course. but instead, you might find it enjoyable to go for regular long rides of about the same distance & or duration. with maybe a wicked long one thrown in every now & then
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Old 05-23-17, 10:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Tony_G
35 miles. This is my first season riding so I've got about three months experience. Previous personal best was 25 miles, taken earlier this month. Still a long way to go to get to the century mark.

I was pretty well used up at the end of the 35 miles. At the end on level ground the best speed I could manage was 10 mph. When I got off the bike, my legs felt like they were made of wood.

I've got new respect for you guys that can do a century.
go, Go, GO!
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Old 05-23-17, 10:24 AM
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Right on! Great accomplishment. Keep up the good work. Don't lose track of the fun.
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Old 05-23-17, 10:24 AM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6
well done, you! like breaking the sound barrier ... a little further ea ride

but that's a good distance for a regular route. I have a cpl (road bike rides) that are approx 20 miles, & others approx 30 miles. not saying you shouldn't try to ride further, just that, when you go out for a ride what are you prepared for? 2 hours? 3? 4? more? what have you eaten in preparation? what are you bringing with you? what can you buy if you stop at the halfway point?

personally, when I'm out for a long time I like to stop at the 1/2 way mark & rest a little & eat something good. 2 - 4 hours is enough time for me away from my car or home

so, that's a great accomplishment but as a new rider you shouldn't feel stressed about riding longer & longer & longer. unless you want to of course. but instead, you might find it enjoyable to go for regular long rides of about the same distance & or duration. with maybe a wicked long one thrown in every now & then
I have some nice multi use bike paths in my area, but I need to throw my bike in the van and drive 10 miles to to get there. Due to the roads in question, no way I'd consider biking to the MUP.

So almost all my rides are on a 5 mile suburban loop that is a mix of sidewalks next to 50 MPH roads and street riding in subdivisions. The good part about this is I can always decide if I feel like doing another 5 mile lap, or breaking off the loop and taking the half mile to home.

Except to drink water, I don't make stops. I don't take food with me either, but I should probably start taking a snack for the longer rides.

No special meals before, but I often drink a home made green smoothie after the ride.
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Old 05-23-17, 10:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Biker395
Just keep at it. You'd be surprised how quickly your body adapts.

Years ago, I found myself off the bike for an extended period of time ... I think it was because of a hand fracture. Until then, I was doing the usual ... riding 35 miles a day to work and back and doing climbing centuries or near centuries on weekends, with an occasional double century.

On my first day back to riding, I was flippin exhausted by the time I got home. It was a voting day, and the polling place was about 1/2 block up from my house and maybe a 20 foot climb. I seriously debated whether it was worth riding that extra 1/2 block.

The key ... especially for us older folks ... is to keep it up. Consistency is king.
I'm trying to ride at least 3 days per week. But spring rain and house painting are conspiring to keep me out of the saddle.
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Old 05-23-17, 10:29 AM
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Originally Posted by auldgeunquers
Right on! Great accomplishment. Keep up the good work. Don't lose track of the fun.
The fun is the best part.
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Old 05-23-17, 10:59 AM
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As you do longer miles it will become necessary to eat something during the ride. On your path to a century a good understanding of the recovery process will also be helpful and maybe even crucial. There is much info on this on the web. Here is one source. Joe Friel - How to Recover
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Old 05-23-17, 11:03 AM
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I'm Mr. Cautious.
Take it easy enough to keep the rubber side down.
Concur on keeping the smiles in.
3 days can go to 4 - 5 with no problem, for the next XX years.

Welcome to BF.
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Old 05-23-17, 11:10 AM
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Good job. What's fun at your stage is the fairly quick progress you will see. I started back riding at age 55. After my first 5 mile ride I thought I was going to die. Took me about 4 months to get up to the 40 mile range, 6 months to a metric century and 12 months to a full century.

Listen to your body. I started getting some knee pain after 3 months. Backed off a bit, got a bike fit and some PT exercises, as I got stronger the problem went away.
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Old 05-23-17, 03:23 PM
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In keeping with the "don't forget the fun" tone in many of these posts, I just want to suggest that 35 miles is long enough to choose a destination and call your next 35-mile ride a "tour!"

I can do ten 35-mile "local" rides in a row and feel like I got nowhere. But then I can do a ride half or two-thirds that distance that takes me to a hotel in the next city or state and I feel like I've really accomplished something.

As others have said, don't worry so much about increasing your mileage or your speed, or about measuring up to anyone on this forum. Most of us are lying anyway. Just work on making those 35-milers (and less) as interesting and fresh as possible.
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Old 05-23-17, 03:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Papa Tom
Most of us are lying anyway.
Hey. I resemble that remark!

Keep it up Tony_G.

I still remember my enthusiasm when I hit 25 miles on a cold windy day when I was getting back into cycling. People looked at me and thought I must won the lottery, lol!
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Old 05-23-17, 08:22 PM
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Well done! Took a year back in the saddle for me to ride my age (63 miles -- I went five miles past my goal). I've ridden a few "metric centuries" since then but still no 100 miler.

Recently I met a guy close to my age who's ridden several 100+ milers this month, including three last week.

I still have a ways to go to get close to that!
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Old 05-23-17, 08:26 PM
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I know how you feel. That was me about five years ago. I've done a couple of centuries since and hate it if I don't do 100 miles in a week. But five years ago I was amazed when I rode over 10 miles.
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Old 05-23-17, 08:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Papa Tom
In keeping with the "don't forget the fun" tone in many of these posts, I just want to suggest that 35 miles is long enough to choose a destination and call your next 35-mile ride a "tour!"

I can do ten 35-mile "local" rides in a row and feel like I got nowhere. But then I can do a ride half or two-thirds that distance that takes me to a hotel in the next city or state and I feel like I've really accomplished something.

As others have said, don't worry so much about increasing your mileage or your speed, or about measuring up to anyone on this forum. Most of us are lying anyway. Just work on making those 35-milers (and less) as interesting and fresh as possible.
I think you are right about the repetitive 35 mile local rides. Occasionally my little five mile laps feels somewhat boring. But on the other hand it is very convenient, so I don't get sufficiently motivated to take a more ambitious route.
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Old 05-24-17, 05:53 AM
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keep up the good work man. i try to make most of my rides useful commutes. like going to the grocery or work or whatever. that way your shorter rides support your longer ones as far as keeping your condition. i also look at commuting by bike as me getting away with doing something wrong. i mean hardly anyone else does it and its lots of fun so it must be wrong right? plus i feel like i am 12 years old again exploring the world. 60 never felt so good as when i am riding.
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Old 05-24-17, 06:29 AM
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Does this mean you'll be doing Horsey Hundred this year? They have shorter routes...
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Old 05-24-17, 09:28 AM
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Very cool. so many of us have gone down this path. I remember when I set a new record for myself at 38 miles, and I was soooo tired.

As others have said, it's amazing how our bodies adapt. What exhausted us before is now routine.

Enjoy!
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Old 05-24-17, 10:50 PM
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Time has a funny way of helping one forget. Although it may be age and not time ... I digress ... it was nearly 10 years ago that I picked up the bike again after 20+ years off. I can still remember thinking to myself - "there's no way I'm going to ride 4 miles to Walmart, AND back". These days, 4 miles is hardly worth getting dressed to go for a ride. So I say as the others have, keep at it - and make sure it stays fun.
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Old 05-25-17, 01:22 AM
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First thing that comes to mind is, "how many people could ride 35 miles, even if their lives depended on it?".

I say, being able to do 35 is pretty darn good. If you have the time, try to make "35" your standard ride. If you can do that, then going farther is more a matter of time available more than anything else.

When I was working, 35 would be a pretty good ride. I signed up for "half centuries" and that was a big deal for me. Now I'm retired and can spend the time to build mileage (but 50 is about what I'm willing to do on a regular basis). I do about 8 hours a week. That seems to be about how much I'm willing to dedicate to it.

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Old 05-25-17, 09:38 AM
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Good going, Tony! Make sure that you drink enough water, a minimum of a bottle every 10-12 miles. Then try taking some snack bars, from Aldi's with you, one every hour. You will change those brick legs to rubber, in no time.

It gets easier!
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Old 05-25-17, 01:02 PM
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Very nice accomplishment and add more miles at your leisure/enjoyment level.

Originally Posted by Tony_G
.......When I got off the bike, my legs felt like they were made of wood...........
IMO, it's better to have "woody legs" than "jello legs." The stiffness will keep you up upright not on the ground.

Originally Posted by Papa Tom
....................As others have said, don't worry so much about increasing your mileage or your speed,.............
In my case, the the increase in mileage and speed was not out of "worry" rather it was what more can I get out of my body. At age of 60 in 2010 I challenged myself with a short, easy 5K walk. Wanting more from myself I said I would accomplish a marathon in 1 year and set out to due so. One year later I walked that same 5K, then the following day I walked a 13.1 mile half marathon and the next day a 26.2 mile marathon during the 2011 Walt Disney World Marathon Weekend event. The same request of myself to complete my first Ironman triathlon in 2013 and this past 2017 Bike Sebring 12/24 Hour event completing 307 miles in 22 hours. My next request is 400 non drafting miles during 2018 Bike Sebring 12/24 Hours as a RAAM Qualifying event.

The preceding is not meant to be a boast but an example of what I was able to do and hope to do because I enjoy challenging myself. An adult guy who hopped on a bike and rode about 8 LONG AND SLOW miles only to discover a passion for spinning wheels that got to go round.

May you have many happy miles ahead.
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