Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fifty Plus (50+)
Reload this Page >

Selecting a mtn bike

Notices
Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

Selecting a mtn bike

Old 07-26-17, 09:54 AM
  #1  
ctpres
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ctpres's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Creede CO in summer & Okeechobee, FL or TX Gulf Coast in winter
Posts: 742

Bikes: Zenetto Stealth road bike & Sundeal M7 MTN bike

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Selecting a mtn bike

Did not want to ask this where the KIDS will answer.
Background:
78 YO so number of years it will be used is probably low
Will only be used in summer. No safe place to ride a road bike
No rock hopping, stump jumping - ATV/Jeep type routes or better - no single track type riding
Can't buy used without driving 150 - 200 miles just to look. Creede, CO is in the middle of nowhere
Confused by options for 26 - 27.5 - 29" tires.
Hi cadence rider - can't mash due to knees
Could spend 1 - 2 K but think there are lots of bikes that will work for under $500.
Just looking for a good "Old Fart" mtn bike. Ideas and suggestions on what worked for you appreciated.

Last edited by ctpres; 07-26-17 at 09:58 AM.
ctpres is offline  
Old 07-26-17, 01:04 PM
  #2  
freedomrider1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: N.W.Ohio
Posts: 1,205
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
https://cosprings.craigslist.org/bik...233398116.html
freedomrider1 is offline  
Old 07-26-17, 01:09 PM
  #3  
ctpres
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ctpres's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Creede CO in summer & Okeechobee, FL or TX Gulf Coast in winter
Posts: 742

Bikes: Zenetto Stealth road bike & Sundeal M7 MTN bike

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by freedomrider1 View Post
Yup lots on Craigs and Ebay but that one is typical. Over 200 miles to look and I would not buy sight unseen. Niner must be good saw a "Damaged frame" on Ebay for over $200 plus shipping!

Last edited by ctpres; 07-26-17 at 01:13 PM.
ctpres is offline  
Old 07-26-17, 02:22 PM
  #4  
freedomrider1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: N.W.Ohio
Posts: 1,205
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You really are in the middle of nowhere,i had a hard time finding Creede. How about a used one around town. You want what is called a hard tail. Meaning no shock on the frame. Less cost and you don.t need it for the riding you do.

Jamis Nemesis Comp Bike 2016 > Summer Bike Clearance | Jenson USA
freedomrider1 is offline  
Old 07-26-17, 03:18 PM
  #5  
ctpres
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ctpres's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Creede CO in summer & Okeechobee, FL or TX Gulf Coast in winter
Posts: 742

Bikes: Zenetto Stealth road bike & Sundeal M7 MTN bike

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
OK Hardtail - one option down.
ctpres is offline  
Old 07-26-17, 05:28 PM
  #6  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 13,152

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 194 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4326 Post(s)
Liked 2,317 Times in 1,497 Posts
I have a couple of bikes that fit the OP's description. The two bikes melded to distill the best of each would have these characteristics:
  • 700x40 or wider tires -- I've found wide tires that can safely be run at fairly low pressure matter more than tread design or anything else. Anything narrower than 700x38 feels sketchy and I'm more focused on staying head-up/wheels-down than enjoying the ride.
  • Linear pull/V-brakes rather than cantilevers. Good linear pull brakes are easier to adjust and demand less squeeze to stop while retaining good modulation. And they can clear wide rims and tires just as well.
  • Weight around 30 lbs or less. Surprisingly -- to myself, anyway -- my lighter road bike only feels lighter and quicker climbing paved hills. My 30 lb 1990s era Univega rigid frame/fork mountain bike feels plenty spry on gravel and grass. I only wish it would clear tires wider than 700x40. I'd slap on a set of Schwalbe Big Ones or the updated variation.

Or just get a fat bike. Seriously, between videos by Jens Jacobs' "Old Man, Fat Bike" channel on YouTube, and those consarned infernal whippersnapper youngsters on GCN's mountain biking partner channel, GMCN, those fat bikes look like the bee's knees for us low-skill riders who enjoy prowling around off road.

Fat bikes seem especially rider friendly on downhills, turns and really rough stuff like "gravel" that's basically just enormous sharp railroad ballast.

In our local casual group rides there's always at least one fat bike and those riders have no trouble cruising at our leisurely 12 mph pace. And I've ridden alongside fat bike riders on the local gravel trails and the reasonably fit riders can cruise all day at 15 mph (heck, I struggle to ride 15 mph on my road bike on pavement!). So the weight, usually around 35 lbs, doesn't seem to hinder riders.

Last edited by canklecat; 07-26-17 at 05:35 PM.
canklecat is offline  
Old 07-26-17, 05:30 PM
  #7  
mileslong
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 105
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The previously posted link to the Jamis is a good example of what I would be considering based on your description of your terrain. I would also be looking at 27.5+ or 29+ for a little extra cushion without the added cost, weight and maintenance of a full suspension.
mileslong is offline  
Old 07-26-17, 06:13 PM
  #8  
ctpres
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ctpres's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Creede CO in summer & Okeechobee, FL or TX Gulf Coast in winter
Posts: 742

Bikes: Zenetto Stealth road bike & Sundeal M7 MTN bike

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
OP Here: Glad I didn't ask the KIDS! Would turn my Zenetto road bike into a gravel bike - but without changing rims and probably brakes can't get over 700x28 which are my current training tires. Not to mention I would really hate to dump my baby in the gravel. Need to save her for my 80th BD century. I'm a techie at heart and so far can't resist the idea of hydraulic disc brakes. Seems similar bikes with 26 to 29 inch tires have same cog and crank ratios. That to me means bigger tires equal less hill climbing ability but faster downhill. I gave up on the need for speed when I hit 43 mph going down the Hurricane Ridge park road in Port Angeles, WA two summers ago. Old bodies don't repair the same. Appreciate the comments - keep em coming and I promise to let y'all know what I end up with and how it works out in the real world of senior citizen riding.
ctpres is offline  
Old 07-26-17, 09:03 PM
  #9  
Mountain Mitch
Senior Member
 
Mountain Mitch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Back-of-beyond, Kootenays, BC
Posts: 709

Bikes: Specialized Roubaix Expert Road and Specialized Stump Jumper FS Mountain; De Vinci Caribou touring, Intense Tracer T275c, Surly Moonlander, Cramerotti

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 149 Post(s)
Liked 69 Times in 43 Posts
You need a 27.5 inch hard tail, with 100 -120 mm of travel in the fork. Air. Details like gearing are a bit hard to address but you would probably be fine with a 30 or 32 crank on a single (X10). Pretty much anything over 2 inches for tires; but not much over (2.1-2.3). You definitely want decent hydraulic disc brakes (I use Avid, Shimano is fine, my experience with Tektro leaves me doubtful).

29ers feel 'funny' to me (a bit unwieldy). Better for rolling over big rocks and drops. 26 is better as a technical trail bike -but is really yesterday's news. Can even be hard to find (and impossible to sell).

I wouldn't bother with tubeless. Little noticeable difference and tend to be fussy.

You will do best with an aluminum bike, unless you want to leave a carbon bike in your estate!
Mountain Mitch is offline  
Old 07-26-17, 09:38 PM
  #10  
kevrider
Senior Member
 
kevrider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: northern nevada
Posts: 360

Bikes: way too many

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 61 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 3 Posts
i would recommend a Salsa Fargo for gravel and dirt road mtn biking. you can fit these bikes with a suspension fork, or you can run it with a carbon or steel fork. a new one is in your price range, but they have been around for a while, so you may be able to find a used one on eBay or CL.

i don't think you would benefit from smaller wheels if you plan to avoid singletrack. you will get a relatively smoother ride on the 29er wagon wheels. you might prefer steel over alum for the same reason.

a gravel bike that fits larger volume tires (40mm or more) would be a valid alternative if you are disinterested in front suspension. but in that scenario, i would still rec a rigid mtn bike for the larger tire volume.

at age 78, i would think you'd want the widest gear range possible. a double, or even a triple crank, would be the way to go.

Last edited by kevrider; 07-27-17 at 01:43 AM.
kevrider is offline  
Old 07-26-17, 10:43 PM
  #11  
big john
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 17,831
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3589 Post(s)
Liked 2,929 Times in 1,620 Posts
Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
The previously posted link to the Jamis is a good example of what I would be considering based on your description of your terrain. I would also be looking at 27.5+ or 29+ for a little extra cushion without the added cost, weight and maintenance of a full suspension.
That Jamis is a 27.5 bike. It looks pretty good to me and there are some others on that site if you click on the "summer bike clearance". I really like the Yeti for around $4k.
big john is online now  
Old 07-27-17, 06:43 AM
  #12  
Phil_gretz
Zip tie Karen
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 6,991

Bikes: '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite, '18 Velobuild VB-R-022, '21 Tsunami SNM-100

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1446 Post(s)
Liked 1,506 Times in 795 Posts
Originally Posted by Mountain Mitch View Post
You need a 27.5 inch hard tail, with 100 -120 mm of travel in the fork. Air. Details like gearing are a bit hard to address but you would probably be fine with a 30 or 32 crank on a single (X10). Pretty much anything over 2 inches for tires; but not much over (2.1-2.3). You definitely want decent hydraulic disc brakes (I use Avid, Shimano is fine, my experience with Tektro leaves me doubtful).

29ers feel 'funny' to me (a bit unwieldy). Better for rolling over big rocks and drops. 26 is better as a technical trail bike -but is really yesterday's news. Can even be hard to find (and impossible to sell).

I wouldn't bother with tubeless. Little noticeable difference and tend to be fussy.

You will do best with an aluminum bike, unless you want to leave a carbon bike in your estate!
^Superb post. Completely accurate. Air front shock is a must, so that you can tune its compression to your weight...


Do this exactly as written.

Last edited by Phil_gretz; 07-27-17 at 12:16 PM.
Phil_gretz is offline  
Old 07-27-17, 06:49 AM
  #13  
Tokwan
Senior Member
 
Tokwan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Penang, Malaysia
Posts: 265

Bikes: Giant/HARO/ Exitway

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 82 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
27.5" is fine. But at 70 YO, why not a full sus? It will you a better and comfy ride. Just wonderin'.
Tokwan is offline  
Old 07-27-17, 07:07 AM
  #14  
prj71
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: North Central Wisconsin
Posts: 2,978
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1694 Post(s)
Liked 431 Times in 277 Posts
Giant ToughRoad.
prj71 is offline  
Old 07-27-17, 11:27 AM
  #15  
Mountain Mitch
Senior Member
 
Mountain Mitch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Back-of-beyond, Kootenays, BC
Posts: 709

Bikes: Specialized Roubaix Expert Road and Specialized Stump Jumper FS Mountain; De Vinci Caribou touring, Intense Tracer T275c, Surly Moonlander, Cramerotti

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 149 Post(s)
Liked 69 Times in 43 Posts
Originally Posted by Tokwan View Post
27.5" is fine. But at 70 YO, why not a full sus? It will you a better and comfy ride. Just wonderin'.
Adds weight and expense. Also, even with a 'lockout' it absorbs some of your pedalling energy. The OP appears to be an experienced road rider so doesn't need a rocking chair! He's just looking for something to ride dirt and gravel roads. The fork should keep him from getting too jarred.
Mountain Mitch is offline  
Old 07-28-17, 05:52 PM
  #16  
70sSanO
Senior Member
 
70sSanO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Mission Viejo
Posts: 4,101

Bikes: 1986 Cannondale SR400 (Flat bar commuter), 1988 Cannondale Criterium XTR, 1992 Serotta T-Max, 1995 Trek 970

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1257 Post(s)
Liked 1,122 Times in 718 Posts
I'm 65 and started riding mountain bikes when I was 61. Takes an insane amount of skill. No one can really help you because there is so much personal preference. What I did was look at reviews of bikes and frames so I could put together a list if potential bikes, well frames for me and a bike for my wife. I spent a long time doing research, but the one advantage I had was that a neighbor gave me an old GT mountain bike so I could at least see what I was getting into.

You have a few options. If you have never ridden a mountain bike or even in dirt roads, it might be worth it to go the cheaper used route just to have some idea if it is what you want to do. I ride 26" hardtails from the 90's. Probably not the best selection and in hindsight I probably should have looked at something newer in a 29". A 29er will roll over a lot if ruts and uneven sections easier than a bike with smaller wheels. On Jeep trails it will make it pretty easy as you will have little technical sections.

I have been pretty lucky with eBay. Bought 3 bikes and 3 frames and a bunch of forks and wheels. You just have to check the pictures over really good. A bone stock bike that looks like it has hardly been ridden is what to look for. If you see something go research the heck out if it. I tend to stay clear of highly upgraded/modified bikes for what you are looking for, because that generally signals a lot of use and maybe abuse. If you don't feel comfortable, especially after answers to questions, move on.

John

Edit added: If you can borrow a mountain bike just to try it out, it would be very helpful.

Last edited by 70sSanO; 07-28-17 at 05:56 PM.
70sSanO is online now  
Old 07-28-17, 06:31 PM
  #17  
ctpres
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ctpres's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Creede CO in summer & Okeechobee, FL or TX Gulf Coast in winter
Posts: 742

Bikes: Zenetto Stealth road bike & Sundeal M7 MTN bike

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
OP Here: Building my wish list
Shimano, Sram or FSA brake and shifting components
Aluminum frame total weight around 30 pounds
Two water bottle mounts
27.5x2 tires
Stainless spokes
22 crank and 34 or 36 cog 3 x 9 min.
Front suspension 100 mm travel minimum with lockout
Close to 30 pounds
Quick release seat and front wheel at minimum
Replaceable rear hanger (NOT FRAME MOUNTED.)
Hydraulic brakes 160 mm min rotors prefer 180 up front
UNDER $500.00 new!
ctpres is offline  
Old 07-28-17, 06:34 PM
  #18  
oldpuck81
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Plano, TX
Posts: 31

Bikes: 2008 Motobecane Immortal Spirit, Motobecane HAL6 Expert & Fantom 29er

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
try bikesdirect.com. Look at 29er hardtails, but a full suspension 27.5 will take you anywhere and is easy on the bones.
oldpuck81 is offline  
Old 07-28-17, 08:17 PM
  #19  
ctpres
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ctpres's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Creede CO in summer & Okeechobee, FL or TX Gulf Coast in winter
Posts: 742

Bikes: Zenetto Stealth road bike & Sundeal M7 MTN bike

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
OP Here: I got it. Here is my new bike! Just about everything I wanted except the 27.5 tires. Now all I have to do is wait for it to get here. ETA late next week. Promise to post bike review and purchase price here in a week or two. Wanted M7XL version but this to good to pass up.

SPECIFICATIONS:
Brand: Sundeal
Model: M7
Frame size: 17"
Color: Red
Weight: 30.9lbs (Size 17")
Condition: New in box
COMPONENTS:
Frame: Tig Welded 6061 Aluminum, water bottle mounts, rack / fender mounts
Fork: Suntour XCM-HLO-26-100 1-1/8"Straight Travel: 100mm with manual lockout
Type: Coil
Rims: Sundeal Alloy, 26", 27mm width (outer), Double Wall, , Schrader valve drilling, Clincher - tubed
Headset: Unbranded, semi-integrated, internal style
Hubs: Aluminum, QR axles, 6-bolt disc compatible, Ball/Cone type bearings
Tires: Kenda Kick Back, Clincher - tubed, Wire Bead, 26 x 2.0", 40-65PSI
Shifters: Shimano Altus, SL-M370, 3 x 9 speed
Front derailleur: Shimano Altus 3 speed
Rear derailleur: Shimano Altus 9 speed
Handlebar: Sundeal 6061 alloy, 620mm
Cranks: Shimano FC-M371, Triple, alloy square taper, 170mm
Cassette: Shimano, CS-HG20-9, 9 speed
Pedals: Alloy / Steel spindle, Unsealed
Chain: KMC Z, 9s
Bottom bracket: Square taper, sealed
Spokes: black coated with brass nipples
Schrader Valves
Stem: Sundeal Alloy, 90mm
Saddle: Sundeal
Seatpost: Sundeal Alloy
Seatpost clamp: Alloy
Brakes: Shimano BR/BL-M355 Hydraulic disc with 160mm rotors
Grips: Rubber, lock-on

ABOUT THE MANUFACTURER:

These bikes are made by Ideal, one of the largest bicycle manufacturers in the world. They supply and manufacturer bikes for a number of many famous brands that you likely know. Sundeal is their house brand. These are of the same high quality as the aforementioned brands.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
bike.jpg (22.9 KB, 89 views)
ctpres is offline  
Old 07-29-17, 05:12 AM
  #20  
mileslong
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 105
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Congratulations, there is nothing quite like getting a new bike.....now go ride it like you stole it!
mileslong is offline  
Old 07-30-17, 04:02 PM
  #21  
ctpres
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ctpres's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Creede CO in summer & Okeechobee, FL or TX Gulf Coast in winter
Posts: 742

Bikes: Zenetto Stealth road bike & Sundeal M7 MTN bike

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Sold my old no name mountain bike to the first one that looked at it for $75. Since new one just cost $185 and $38 freight - I am in good shape. Will review the new Sundeal next week.
ctpres is offline  
Old 08-07-17, 01:59 PM
  #22  
ctpres
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ctpres's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Creede CO in summer & Okeechobee, FL or TX Gulf Coast in winter
Posts: 742

Bikes: Zenetto Stealth road bike & Sundeal M7 MTN bike

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
OP here: as promised here a quick review of what I ended up buying.
My new Old Fart bike is a Sundeal M7. Price - won on Ebay bidding $185 plus $38 shipping - otherwise about $300 delivered. Out of the box - only Shimano Altus hydraulic brakes needed any attention - had to adjust reach to keep lever from hitting bar. After a couple rides had to readjust - back closer to the original setting. Guess they just needed burping. Brakes worked very good on first serious downhill. Was expecting noise but there was none. Shimano Altus shifters take a little getting used. Two paddles one up and one down actually easy to use. I thought shift display not needed but I find myself using it frequently. Shifting a bit loud. ​The low gear 11 22 combination allowed me to climb places I could not before. The really big surprise -TIRES.- the Kenda Kick Backs (small block) really are different. Close spacing on the blocks/knobs makes them quieter and smoother riding on pavement. Previous bike had regular knobby tires and I had to be very careful crossing the loose gravel crown created by the ATVs. The Kick Backs seem handle the loose stuff by rolling over vs digging in. Previous bike had no suspension. Started out with front fork locked and then changed to lightest setting - wow much better for my old bones. So I can now say it is possible to find a good budget priced light weight (30.9 pounds) mountain bike with reasonable quality components. I did look hard for one with 27.5 tires - but seems 27.5 bikes in same price range as 26ers have lower quality components. Looked like one or two hundred more for one with 27.5 and same components. Guess the marketing guys are are just doing their thing - maybe in a couple more years that price difference will change. I'm happy.
ctpres is offline  
Old 08-07-17, 06:15 PM
  #23  
70sSanO
Senior Member
 
70sSanO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Mission Viejo
Posts: 4,101

Bikes: 1986 Cannondale SR400 (Flat bar commuter), 1988 Cannondale Criterium XTR, 1992 Serotta T-Max, 1995 Trek 970

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1257 Post(s)
Liked 1,122 Times in 718 Posts
Congrats on the new bike! Glad it is working out for you. If the terrain is not too rough, a 26" is just as good. It will climb easier with the same gear ratio.

John
70sSanO is online now  
Old 08-09-17, 06:41 PM
  #24  
Retro Grouch 
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Posts: 30,208

Bikes: Catrike 559 I own some others but they don't get ridden very much.

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1564 Post(s)
Liked 595 Times in 343 Posts
I think that you should purge "mountain bike" from your vocabulary.

A well stocked bike shop today will have dozens of quite different styles of bicycles in stock. Tier widths might vary from less than one inch to more than 4 inches. Describe the kind of riding that you picture yourself doing. Ask them where places like that exist in your area. If they can't answer that question pretty easily, try a different shop. If they do have a good answer for you, ask what kind of bike they'd recommend for that trail.
__________________
My greatest fear is all of my kids standing around my coffin and talking about "how sensible" dad was.
Retro Grouch is offline  
Old 08-10-17, 10:29 AM
  #25  
ctpres
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ctpres's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Creede CO in summer & Okeechobee, FL or TX Gulf Coast in winter
Posts: 742

Bikes: Zenetto Stealth road bike & Sundeal M7 MTN bike

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
I think that you should purge "mountain bike" from your vocabulary.

A well stocked bike shop today will have dozens of quite different styles of bicycles in stock. Tier widths might vary from less than one inch to more than 4 inches. Describe the kind of riding that you picture yourself doing. Ask them where places like that exist in your area. If they can't answer that question pretty easily, try a different shop. If they do have a good answer for you, ask what kind of bike they'd recommend for that trail.
Thanks but as 78 YO - baring a total loss of either current bike - my bike buying days are over.
ctpres is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
solis888
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
79
07-02-13 03:40 PM
Tessek461
Bicycle Mechanics
4
11-19-11 02:10 AM
Teon
General Cycling Discussion
1
06-04-11 06:46 AM
pastoryusuk
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
9
02-05-11 04:23 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.