Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fifty Plus (50+)
Reload this Page >

Any tandem riders here?

Notices
Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

Any tandem riders here?

Old 08-20-17, 12:00 PM
  #1  
jppe
Let's do a Century
Thread Starter
 
jppe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 8,050

Bikes: Cervelo R3 Disc, Pinarello Prince/Campy SR; Cervelo R3/Sram Red; Trek 5900/Duraace, Cervelo P2C/Duraace, Cannondle Tandem/Ultegra, Lynskey GR260 Ultegra

Mentioned: 55 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 557 Post(s)
Liked 599 Times in 292 Posts
Any tandem riders here?

Just picked up a used one for the wife, grandkids any anyone else with courage to sit behind me. It wasn't exactly what I wanted but it was a good deal. Now I can figure out if we can ride a tandem without breaking the bank.

What have you learned riding a tandem that you think would help us?
jppe is offline  
Old 08-20-17, 01:07 PM
  #2  
Stevie47
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: paradise
Posts: 286

Bikes: Waterford, Orbea, Giant

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jppe View Post
Just picked up a used one for the wife, grandkids any anyone else with courage to sit behind me. It wasn't exactly what I wanted but it was a good deal. Now I can figure out if we can ride a tandem without breaking the bank.

What have you learned riding a tandem that you think would help us?
YouTube is your friend for the technical aspects. Patience is the secret for everything else. You won't be as fast as you're used to and climbs are murder. But with the right attitude both from the captain and the stoker it's a ton of fun.
Stevie47 is offline  
Old 08-20-17, 02:13 PM
  #3  
Retro Grouch 
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Posts: 30,133

Bikes: Catrike 559 I own some others but they don't get ridden very much.

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1536 Post(s)
Liked 523 Times in 305 Posts
Mrs. Grouch and I rode tandems together for over 35 years. Unfortunately, we don't have one at present.

1. The majority opinion on getting launched is for the captain to straddle the bike and hold it upright while the stoker gets on and clips in both feet.
2. Get into the habit of announcing bumps because your stoker can't see them coming.
3. As captain, my view never changed. All that I saw was a strip of road ahead. Whenever there was beautiful scenery or something else interesting to see, my stoker ALWAYS noticed it first and pointed it out for me.
4. Whichever way your relationship is headed a tandem will get you there quicker.
__________________
My greatest fear is all of my kids standing around my coffin and talking about "how sensible" dad was.
Retro Grouch is offline  
Old 08-20-17, 02:34 PM
  #4  
B. Carfree
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Posts: 7,048
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 509 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
My spouse and I have been riding tandems since 1989. While we do it differently than most (she's 5'6" and I'm 6'2", but I ride stoker), we have picked up a few things that apply to all tandems, even those that put the bigger person in the way of the view.

First off, while you're feeling no pain in the front saddle, those bumps and potholes you're hitting are breaking the rear end of your stoker. For every millimeter your saddle bumps up, the stoker's goes up three times as much because it sits right over the rear axle. Also, the stoker doesn't see it coming. Ride accordingly.

Second of all, when you casually move the bike side to side, particularly when climbing, the poor stoker is having to hold on as though riding a bucking bronco. Take it easy up there if you want any power from the rear engine.

Related to the first two, get the widest most supple tires that will fit on your tandem. (Compass is the place to start, and probably end, your search.) There is such a tremendous difference in the ride quality, both in comfort and performance, between riding at 120 psi and rolling at 40 psi. Seriously, go wide, go supple and go with the minimum pressure that avoids pinch flats (very low if you follow the first point about missing all those road defects).

It's also not unusual for tandem riders to use a slightly lower cadence than they do on their half-bikes. Don't sweat it if you find yourself dropping your cadence into the 80's, that's normal. Perhaps related, we often are comfortable with larger jumps in gearing.

Bear in mind that with two riders on the bike at once, breaks and rest stops will come four times as frequently as they do on a half-bike. Avoid any urge to complain about yet another break or pit-stop, just plan better. Stokers often don't get up out of the saddle as often as captains, so their rear end can get a little sore as they get used to it all.

Lastly, always check your front tire for any defects or issues. A front tire failure on a tandem can be much, much worse than on a half-bike. There's just a lot more energy going into that front end (hence the reason there aren't many tandem-rated carbon forks) and the stoker always takes the brunt of any crash.

Now go have some fun.

On a related note, I'm just about to resurrect the child crank that I used for a few years on our first tandem with our son decades ago. This time that old tandem will have my grand-daughters stoking as we haul them home from school while their mother does medical school.
B. Carfree is offline  
Old 08-20-17, 03:30 PM
  #5  
JanMM
rebmeM roineS
 
JanMM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Metro Indy, IN
Posts: 16,032

Bikes: Bacchetta Giro A20, RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 608 Post(s)
Liked 259 Times in 168 Posts
The stoker is never at fault.

Communicate. Many captains call out shifts. I don't, but my stoker is pretty used to my shifting habits and I aim to not do anything disruptive to our pedaling efforts. Agree that bumps should be called out. At stoplights, whoever notices yellow for the cross-street calls it out so we can be ready to go when we get the green.
__________________
Bacchetta Giro A20, RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer
JanMM is offline  
Old 08-20-17, 03:46 PM
  #6  
shelbyfv 
Senior Member
 
shelbyfv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: TN
Posts: 8,366
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2259 Post(s)
Liked 2,189 Times in 1,188 Posts
There is an entire subforum right here on BF Tandem Cycling - Bike Forums Enough to keep you reading for quite awhile!
shelbyfv is offline  
Old 08-20-17, 05:58 PM
  #7  
Machka 
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 52,043

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 139 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3168 Post(s)
Liked 437 Times in 263 Posts
Rowan and I have a tandem and used to do quite a lot of riding with it but we live in a very hilly area now, and tandems don't work quite as well in these sorts of hills.
Machka is offline  
Old 08-20-17, 07:07 PM
  #8  
Mark W
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 79
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
My wife and I ride a tandem on club rides, charity rides, touring, etc. it's a lot of fun, and we both get to the top of the hill together. About the only riding we don't do together is long randonneuring rides--my wife draws the line at 70-80 miles for a ride.

Be patient and make sure you have the same plan for the ride--if you bump the distance up without discussion or change to a hillier route it may not go over well. Just keep it fun for both of you. Trust is hard to earn but even harder to get back.

Mark W

Last edited by Mark W; 08-20-17 at 07:14 PM.
Mark W is offline  
Old 08-21-17, 04:29 AM
  #9  
jwalther
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Lexington KY
Posts: 359

Bikes: Pinarello Dogma F10, Felt Breed 30, Co-Motion Supremo Tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 60 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 14 Posts
Remember, the stoker is always right (especially when she is your wife).
jwalther is offline  
Old 08-21-17, 09:29 AM
  #10  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 17,485

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2951 Post(s)
Liked 870 Times in 657 Posts
My wife and I have been riding a tandem since '07. My wife does all her riding on the tandem and I ride my single only a few times a year. We ride 2,000-3,000 miles/year. My wife rode her single before we got the tandem. Her fitness increased greatly after starting stoking, I think because I can kind of take the edge off the hard efforts so she can ride both longer and harder on the tandem that she could on her single. We mostly sport ride, by ourselves and group rides, and have done some loaded touring, which we really like. We bought a used CoMotion Speedster, a 36 lb. steel bike with touring braze-ons and room for big tires and fenders. In perfect condition, it cost us about 1/2 of new.

My wife had displays for both her HR and mine. I don't see hers. She works to approximately match my HR, which is how we distribute the effort to make it fun for both of us. We love riding tandem together.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 08-21-17, 02:31 PM
  #11  
B. Carfree
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Posts: 7,048
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 509 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
My wife and I have been riding a tandem since '07. My wife does all her riding on the tandem and I ride my single only a few times a year. We ride 2,000-3,000 miles/year. My wife rode her single before we got the tandem. Her fitness increased greatly after starting stoking, I think because I can kind of take the edge off the hard efforts so she can ride both longer and harder on the tandem that she could on her single. We mostly sport ride, by ourselves and group rides, and have done some loaded touring, which we really like. We bought a used CoMotion Speedster, a 36 lb. steel bike with touring braze-ons and room for big tires and fenders. In perfect condition, it cost us about 1/2 of new.

My wife had displays for both her HR and mine. I don't see hers. She works to approximately match my HR, which is how we distribute the effort to make it fun for both of us. We love riding tandem together.
I ride stoker on our tandem. I really enjoy the fact that I can simply bury myself on the climbs, knowing that if I completely bonk out my wife can provide enough power to keep us going while I recover, albeit at a much reduced speed. I rarely go as deep into the red on my half-bike, in fact I often find myself dogging it on the approach to the last big climb of the day just so I don't burn out.

I also think there's something magical and entrancing about both riders on the tandem pounding up a hill. It's like a strenuous modern dance that no one wants to cause to end by backing off. Many times we have both been surprised to have arrived at the top of a familiar climb without really being aware of where we were or how we got there.
B. Carfree is offline  
Old 08-21-17, 05:27 PM
  #12  
zonatandem
Senior Member
 
zonatandem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 11,017

Bikes: Custom Zona c/f tandem + Scott Plasma single

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 75 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 13 Times in 6 Posts
Key to tandem riding: Communicate!!!
The idiot (pilot) up front must tell the nice person on the back (stoker) what he is doing. She is NOT a mind reader.
SO . . . say out loud when shifting, braking, coasting, resume pedaling, standing, turns, etc..
Stoker does the turn and stopping/slowing signaling.
Been riding in tandem for over over 42 years.
Enjoy the ride TWOgether!
Rudy and Kay/zonatandem

Oh, and take her out for coffee/lunch!
zonatandem is offline  
Old 08-21-17, 11:04 PM
  #13  
Wildwood
Veteran, Pacifist
 
Wildwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Seattle area
Posts: 10,922

Bikes: Bikes??? Thought this was social media?!?

Mentioned: 247 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2754 Post(s)
Liked 1,617 Times in 942 Posts
To give my stokers a sense of control the drum brake lever is theirs.

Agree 100% with @zonatandem about communication.

As strong a rider as you are @jppe, slowing down some might be advisable, at least until your stokers are acclimatized. i put fatter tires on too, as the wife felt they were 'safer'.

And don't be surprised if nobody takes to it. My experience.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
Cedar Riv Watershed Ed Ctr.jpg (99.4 KB, 151 views)
Wildwood is offline  
Old 08-22-17, 01:42 PM
  #14  
lovemachine
Senior Member
 
lovemachine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 52
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
In my opinion it's the most fun you can have on a bicycle without jumping. Take it slow, be patient and understanding. It will be frustrating and awkward at first, you do so many things automatically that will be annoying to the other person on the bike (like stopping pedaling abruptly) that you will have to stop or learn ease into. After enough time on the tandem you will be able to read each other's minds and communicate through the pedals. You will ease up slightly and she will adjust to you slowing or coasting without a word. Don't expect it to go smoothly at first and just focus on getting smoother each ride, soon you will be faster and happier than you ever though possible.

kwog
lovemachine is offline  
Old 08-22-17, 07:58 PM
  #15  
DeadGrandpa
Philosopher of Bicycling
 
DeadGrandpa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Carolina
Posts: 1,099

Bikes: Too many, yet not enough.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 448 Post(s)
Liked 224 Times in 155 Posts
I recently got my second tandem, a Fandango from MTBtandems near Atlanta. It allows 2.3 or wider knobby tires, and I got a second wheelset for road 40c tires. The gearing is great for hills and the bike is, overall, a huge improvement over the 30 year old Santana we had been riding. Tandem riding is, as others have said, a great experience for growing closer. Unless you're not into that, in which case you won't be together very much longer.
DeadGrandpa is offline  
Old 08-23-17, 11:01 AM
  #16  
JanMM
rebmeM roineS
 
JanMM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Metro Indy, IN
Posts: 16,032

Bikes: Bacchetta Giro A20, RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 608 Post(s)
Liked 259 Times in 168 Posts
hmmmmm.................looks like this thread got moved from Fifty Plus to ............................Fifty Plus.
__________________
Bacchetta Giro A20, RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer
JanMM is offline  
Old 08-26-17, 12:09 PM
  #17  
nmichell
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Fort Collins, CO
Posts: 395

Bikes: '05 Salsa La Raza, '13 Aluboo (bamboo) SS, '12 DaVinci Grand Junction tandem

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Some great advice here! My wife and I have a daVinci with two freewheels, so the stoker can coast when she wants to (as can the captain, I suppose). You still need to be in sync, otherwise it feels like you're fighting each other, but fortunately for me, my wife handles that really well.

The most important rule, as someone already pointed out: The stoker is never at fault :-)
nmichell is offline  
Old 08-26-17, 02:15 PM
  #18  
Trsnrtr
Super Moderator
 
Trsnrtr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Central Illinois
Posts: 19,821

Bikes: Giant Propel, Colnago V3, Co-Motion Supremo, ICE VTX, ICE VTX WC

Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8221 Post(s)
Liked 1,727 Times in 854 Posts
My wife and I (both 66) did 68.7 miles on our tandem today. Great time.
__________________
Dennis T

Where there is a will, there's a way. Where there is no will, there's an excuse.





Trsnrtr is offline  
Old 08-26-17, 10:33 PM
  #19  
B. Carfree
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Posts: 7,048
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 509 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by nmichell View Post
Some great advice here! My wife and I have a daVinci with two freewheels, so the stoker can coast when she wants to (as can the captain, I suppose). You still need to be in sync, otherwise it feels like you're fighting each other, but fortunately for me, my wife handles that really well.

The most important rule, as someone already pointed out: The stoker is never at fault :-)
I don't think so. For decades we did most of our tandem riding ninety degrees out of phase. It felt perfectly natural, especially on flats where the power pulses are evened out. It takes a bit of patience to learn to climb out of the saddle with the pedals at 90 OOP, but it's not half-bad once you get the hang of it.

That said, when we relocated to a less flat locale, we did set our pedals to just a couple of teeth out of phase. The thinking is that if they are perfectly in phase it is too easy for the stronger rider to overwhelm the other so that each rider isn't contributing an equal amount of their capability. It actually took us a while to get used to being nearly in phase after so many years of smoother power strokes.

There's lots of correct ways to do this, no matter what the owner of Santana says.
B. Carfree is offline  
Old 08-27-17, 05:08 AM
  #20  
jppe
Let's do a Century
Thread Starter
 
jppe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 8,050

Bikes: Cervelo R3 Disc, Pinarello Prince/Campy SR; Cervelo R3/Sram Red; Trek 5900/Duraace, Cervelo P2C/Duraace, Cannondle Tandem/Ultegra, Lynskey GR260 Ultegra

Mentioned: 55 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 557 Post(s)
Liked 599 Times in 292 Posts
Thanks to all for the terrific insights. Just what I was hoping for.

Other than our quick ride around the neighborhood we did our first ride yesterday. It was 21 miles and a lot of the things pointed out in this thread surfaced. I do a lot of things on the bike intuitively and I've got to be more vocal about many of those. I about wore her out with my higher cadence pedaling style so we'll work on that. We're still working on her positioning and I think with one more slight tilt of the saddle we might have that dialed in. We got better at starting and stopping over the ride. Right now starting on a hill seems pretty daunting!!!

She indicated that she really enjoyed it so we'll see. It was a mostly flat ride but we did take on one 9-10% hill and we were able to ease up it much better than I would have guessed. For this ride she was using platform pedals which was good for mounting and dismounting but not so good for pedaling. She has toe clips on her road bikes so I'll move those over to the tandem which should help us ease along even better.

She has pretty short arms and can't comfortably reach her water bottle. She's either going to use her camelback or she could put a bottle in my jersey pocket as she can easily each that. She drinks a lot more fluids than I do so keeping the fluids handy is a must!

(A year ago today I was pedaling through Yellowstone on my XC trip. What a blast!!)
jppe is offline  
Old 08-27-17, 05:41 PM
  #21  
zonatandem
Senior Member
 
zonatandem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 11,017

Bikes: Custom Zona c/f tandem + Scott Plasma single

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 75 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 13 Times in 6 Posts
Good start!!!
Been pedaling out-of-phase (OOP) 90 degrees for over a quarter million miles since 1975.
Do some more rides and be sure to COMMUNICATE!
Rudy and Kay/zonatandem
zonatandem is offline  
Old 08-27-17, 09:23 PM
  #22  
B. Carfree
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Posts: 7,048
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 509 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by B. Carfree View Post

Now go have some fun.

On a related note, I'm just about to resurrect the child crank that I used for a few years on our first tandem with our son decades ago. This time that old tandem will have my grand-daughters stoking as we haul them home from school while their mother does medical school.
I did finally find all the necessary parts and got my old tandem ship-shape for an almost-five- and almost-four-year-old. The girls came over today with their helmets not really knowing what was in store. The almost-five-year-old was initially reluctant to get on the bike. She recently took a spill on her own tiny bike and landed on her face, which was painful but didn't leave any lasting marks.

After talking about it and then sitting up on the saddle while we walked down the street to the bike path, she decide to give it a go. Soon we were doing laps around the soccer field with a detour over the river and ending each lap with a race against her uncle, who was running. That got her little sister excited to give it a go and by the end of the day I had ridden almost 20 miles with one or the other of them back there.

This week we take delivery of a Burley Piccolo trailing bike, which will turn the tandem into a triple so that both of them can ride at the same time. This is going to be fun. I hope they remember this in a few decades when I need them to push my wheelchair.
B. Carfree is offline  
Likes For B. Carfree:
Old 09-11-17, 11:19 PM
  #23  
LuckySailor
Senior Member
 
LuckySailor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Posts: 660

Bikes: Trek 520 total custom build, Cannondale Mountain Tandem, Oryx Mountain Bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 61 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Rowan and I have a tandem and used to do quite a lot of riding with it but we live in a very hilly area now, and tandems don't work quite as well in these sorts of hills.
why? I've been around this forum long enough to know that you both are very experienced riders. So I don't understand your comment. When I bought our tandem in Victoria, BC a couple years back, we rode up a hill so steep, everyone thought that there was no way. and we did it pretty well with ease. My wife is not really a cyclist, and had never been on a tandem! Since then she loves the tandem......now if I could just convince her to ride across the US with me for my 60th!
LuckySailor is offline  
Old 09-11-17, 11:53 PM
  #24  
Machka 
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 52,043

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 139 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3168 Post(s)
Liked 437 Times in 263 Posts
Originally Posted by LuckySailor View Post
why? I've been around this forum long enough to know that you both are very experienced riders. So I don't understand your comment. When I bought our tandem in Victoria, BC a couple years back, we rode up a hill so steep, everyone thought that there was no way. and we did it pretty well with ease. My wife is not really a cyclist, and had never been on a tandem! Since then she loves the tandem......now if I could just convince her to ride across the US with me for my 60th!
When I lived in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada for many years my perception of what constituted a "steep hill" was very different from my current perception about steep hills.

We live on a 14% grade hill which is one of the flatter roads in our immediate area. And there isn't just one hill ... they're everywhere. There are routes here I have trouble doing on my single bicycle with great gearing ... never mind a tandem!! There's one 100K route I've yet to complete within the randonneuring time limit ... I think on my last attempt, I was just over, but it was an effort to do that well.

I've coined a whole new description of what "flat" is. Tasmanian Flat is a ride that amounts to a 1 or less.
In other words, if the distance is 100 km, and there is 1000 metres of climbing, that's a 1. 1000 metres of climbing/100,000 metres in distance * 100 = 1.

I had a look at a 400K recently run in Manitoba, and IIRC it came up as a 0.1. If I hadn't spent 13 years living in Manitoba, that would be almost hard to imagine.


All that said, we could have ridden the route we rode on Saturday with a tandem ... it's one of the few flatter routes in the area (0.68). And if we didn't mind negotiating our way through a never-ending maze of road intersection barricades, we could probably take our tandem on the Cycleway. And of course, we can ride it up north where I've managed to design routes that come in at comfortable numbers like 0.6 to 0.8.

But in addition to the hills in the Hobart area, the roads aren't particularly brilliant and there's a lot of traffic ... neither of which make cycling in general very nice, and especially not on a tandem.
Machka is offline  
Old 09-12-17, 02:13 PM
  #25  
stevoo
Stevoo
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: So Cal
Posts: 215

Bikes: Road and mountain tandems, single bikes too.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Yes, road for 30yrs, mtn for 17yrs.

Start with shorter rides.
Let her have input on the route.
Stop for breaks as she needs them.
Keep it fun.
The rest you will figure out.

Hope it works out for you.
Some folks love it, some not so much. Never know until you try.

Tandem allows the avid rider to share some adventures that a casual rider would normally miss out on. Plus you never have to wait for them or wonder where they are.

Good luck.
stevoo is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.