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Very scary - Exercise kills

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Old 10-17-17, 11:11 AM
  #51  
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Life is potentially fatal.

My riding has dropped off this season because of a major move and ministry change. So now going into the archery deer hunt here in the north, I am glad for residual fitness when it came time to drag a deer out of the legendary swamp I hunt. Yes, breathing and pulse was elevated but every 25yds I stopped to settle down. Total drag distance to my house was 300yds. I am grateful to be in this condition with my 60th only days away. My next deer will be a longer drag out as I moved the blind further back for a better place. Why? No one hunts this area and it’s where the big ones hide and with wolves, bears and cougars...you just never know.
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Old 10-18-17, 09:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Machoman121 View Post
No Cookies | Gold Coast Bulletin - Regarding Dean Mercer - the Aussie Triathlete

&

No Cookies | Daily Telegraph-Regarding Lisa Curry

There's a book out on the topic:

https://www.velopress.com/books/the-haywire-heart/

Too much exercise can kill you. The Haywire Heart is the first book to examine heart conditions in athletes. Intended for anyone who competes in endurance sports like cycling, triathlon, running races of all distances, and cross-country skiing, The Haywire Heart presents the evidence that going too hard or too long can damage your heart forever. You’ll find what to watch out for, what to do about it, and how to protect your heart so you can enjoy the sports you love for years to come.

The Haywire Heart shares the developing research into a group of conditions known as “athlete’s heart”, starting with a wide-ranging look at the warning signs, symptoms, and how to recognize your potential risk. Leading cardiac electrophysiologist and masters athlete Dr. John Mandrola explores the prevention and treatment of heart conditions in athletes like arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation and flutter, tachycardia, hypertrophy, and coronary artery disease. He reviews new research about exercise intensity and duration, recovery, inflammation and calcification, and the ways athletes inflict lasting harm.

These heart problems are appearing with alarming frequency among masters athletes who are pushing their bodies harder than ever in the hope that exercise will keep them healthy and strong into their senior years. The book is complete with gripping case studies of elite and age-group athletes from journalist Chris Case—like the scary condition that nearly killed cyclist and coauthor Lennard Zinn—and includes a frank discussion of exercise addiction and the mental habits that prevent athletes from seeking medical help when they need it.

Dr. Mandrola explains why many doctors misdiagnose heart conditions in athletes and offers an invaluable guide on how to talk with your doctor about your condition and its proven treatments. He covers known heart irritants, training and rest modifications, effective medications, and safe supplements that can reduce the likelihood of heart damage from exercise.

Heart conditions affect hardcore athletes as well as those who take up sports seeking better health and weight loss. The Haywire Heart is a groundbreaking and critically important guide to heart care for athletes. By protecting your heart now and watching for the warning signs, you can avoid crippling heart conditions and continue to exercise and compete for years to come.
It would seem to me that this research flys in the face of the "real cyclist" that claim you must ride so hard you are in pain. You know the no pain no gain types.
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Old 10-18-17, 09:45 AM
  #53  
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OTOH exercise absolutely good for you, if you dont over do it. Far better than setting and rusting.
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Old 10-18-17, 11:01 AM
  #54  
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Let your moderation be known unto all men. Philippians 4:5 (KJV)

Moderation in all things, especially moderation. ― Ralph Waldo Emerson
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Old 10-18-17, 11:23 AM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by rydabent View Post
It would seem to me that this research flys in the face of the "real cyclist" that claim you must ride so hard you are in pain. You know the no pain no gain types.
It's not binary. The strongest riders spend plenty of time at moderate intensity. But they want to get faster; to ride fast, you have to ride fast. (Both a tautology and a training philosophy.) And riding fast hurts. The more hurt you can tolerate, the faster you will go.

But if you don't care about going fast, then there's no need.
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Old 10-18-17, 11:29 AM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by FlamsteadHill View Post
Let your moderation be known unto all men. Philippians 4:5 (KJV)

Moderation in all things, especially moderation. ― Ralph Waldo Emerson
Romans 5:3-4

More than that, let us rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope,
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Old 10-18-17, 11:54 AM
  #57  
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and apparently .... heart attacks .....
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Old 10-18-17, 12:54 PM
  #58  
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Perspective

Look, as I and others have posted, Life is a Terminal Illness. So focus should be on how to live, not on how long.

So, a person dies of a heart attack while riding hard. Lot better than many alternatives. At least for me it is.

In my not so humble opinion our focus ought to be on having and maintaining the courage to Live, even while we know their is a killing frost lurking over the hill.

There is money to be made and power to be grabbed by keeping people scared and promising security. Even though the promise is seldom kept, if fear is kept high enough people will follow anyway.

For us, we can keep each other grounded and deaf to those siren calls.

LIVE!
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Old 10-18-17, 12:59 PM
  #59  
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Unable to edit.

Autocorrect for the site refuses to let me change a word I know is wrong. Sorry.
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Old 11-09-17, 05:03 AM
  #60  
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my solution to this is to have a ensure that i have a proper rest - at least 2 days in between a hard cycling session. Joe Friel in his books talk about sleep as a critical tool to ensure one is rested and allows the body to recuperate. I'm hoping that the recuperation and rest will enable the heart to heal whatever damage i've done in the heart session and to allow me to keep on cycling for as long as possible.
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Old 11-09-17, 10:48 AM
  #61  
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As a 75+ rider who attempts to remain competitive by riding with like minded groups (generally younger) it would seem we must make choices. I had AFib burned out by cardiac ablation, Ventricle tachycardia resolved by installed ICD (caused by a prescription drug coupled to high intensity cycling), lowered max heart rate due to prescribed anti arrhythmic drug plus a blood cancer , kidney issues and peripheral neuropathy resulting from a back fusion. I made my choice and have added power meter training recently and maintain my positions on Strava.
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Old 11-09-17, 11:08 AM
  #62  
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Having never had a stress test or my heart checked out, this is a bit worrisome. Taking up running this year, and ramping it up as my legs allow, it seems like some risk because some symptoms may not always be apparent. Maybe it's a good idea for any of us to get some of these tests done regardless of whether everything feels ok.
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Old 11-10-17, 02:27 AM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
Having never had a stress test or my heart checked out, this is a bit worrisome. Taking up running this year, and ramping it up as my legs allow, it seems like some risk because some symptoms may not always be apparent. Maybe it's a good idea for any of us to get some of these tests done regardless of whether everything feels ok.
I hear these heart tests generally produce a negative results for issues. The heart is a very elusive organ. It tells you very little until it's too late - that's what makes it scary.
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Old 11-10-17, 05:27 AM
  #64  
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BS is my response. I WILL GO OUT on my own accord or not. My 3 leaking heart vales might lead to problems, my Gleason 10 prostate cancer has an excellent chance of metastasizing within the next few years, bicycling next to 65mph traffic is not the best. There's nothing scary about the "article" IMO and even "in moderation" has just been debunked regarding some cancers, Even moderate alcohol consumption may increase risk of certain cancers, experts warn - ABC News

I have NO DESIRE for a long life if enjoyment in living has been compromised. Future goals are only up to 2020 when I'll be 70 and if I don't make it, so be it.

http://nypost.com/2017/11/06/runner-...ey-world-race/ One never knows.

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Old 11-10-17, 05:36 AM
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Originally Posted by HawkOwl View Post
Look, as I and others have posted, Life is a Terminal Illness. So focus should be on how to live, not on how long.
LIVE!
^^ This ^^
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Old 11-14-17, 07:53 PM
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Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
Having never had a stress test or my heart checked out, this is a bit worrisome. Taking up running this year, and ramping it up as my legs allow, it seems like some risk because some symptoms may not always be apparent. Maybe it's a good idea for any of us to get some of these tests done regardless of whether everything feels ok.
Well yes, of course it would be! We'd all like to have those sorts of negatives out of our lives, or at least know what to avoid. Unfortunately, current medical practice (I'm not being facetious) is to diagnose heart problems by means of a heart attack. The reason for this is simply cost. Unless you can present with a compelling case of bad-heart symptoms prior to a heart attack, your insurance won't pay for it. Which doesn't mean you can't just pay for it yourself. Of course you can.

You'll want to talk to a cardiologist about the many tests with can be performed, from tracer stress tests with camera to CAT scans. Cost is maybe $3,000 for the full set, but don't quote me on that. Thing is, tests and preventative maintenance are way cheaper than surviving a heart attack, but giving everyone the tests is more expensive than the attacks, because that's not the only thing people die of. It's always about the money.
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Old 11-15-17, 07:15 AM
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On the other hand, if you don't get any tests, you might die six days sooner because of micro-aggression towards your heart, and live six weeks longer because of improved fitness ... or you might slip in the shower and break your neck this morning before you even read this.

At some point the stress comes from the stress tests. The worry is more damaging than the exercise, for sure.
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Old 11-20-17, 06:06 PM
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Too much of anything can kill you. Then again, there are cases when even the "experts" like Jim Fixx drop dead early. I'll keep riding, thank you.
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Old 11-21-17, 06:04 PM
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Personal observation/test:
At age 85 have bicycled 300-Thousand + miles. Still ride +/- 100 miles a week year round.
Am I gonna die . . . ?
Of course!
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Old 11-21-17, 08:32 PM
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You and carbonfiberboy ... when it is finally revealed that you are cyborgs, I for one won't be surprised.
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Old 12-14-17, 05:59 AM
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2,500 years ago, the first marathoner, Phillipedes, dropped dead after running to Athens with the good news of the
Athenian victory. So this is really old "news"
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Old 12-16-17, 11:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Machoman121 View Post
I hear these heart tests generally produce a negative results for issues. The heart is a very elusive organ. It tells you very little until it's too late - that's what makes it scary.
My doctor had told me my exercise heart rate should be 133bpm. I told him I was getting 175bpm on the treadmill. He asked if I was getting dizzy or felt any chest pains. I said no. That was the end of that.

But I was getting worried because of stories of regular marathon runners dropping dead. Luckily during a bike-to-work day, I was given a bike trail map. I studied it and found a safe way to get to work without getting into the fastest part of traffic. I had been cycle commuting ever since until I retired. So at the gym, I skip the treadmill.
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Old 12-16-17, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Daniel4 View Post
My doctor had told me my exercise heart rate should be 133bpm. I told him I was getting 175bpm on the treadmill. He asked if I was getting dizzy or felt any chest pains. I said no. That was the end of that.
My doc brings up stress test and chuckles. He says “you do that every ride!”.
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Old 12-16-17, 06:10 PM
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I'd rather die from over doing it that from sitting on the couch.
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Old 12-16-17, 06:38 PM
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Originally Posted by takenreasy View Post
I'd rather die from over doing it that from sitting on the couch.
Just an observation. In the A&S section cyclists are criticized if they die exercizing the right of way instead of getting out of the way.
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