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My First Complete Bike Build

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My First Complete Bike Build

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Old 01-09-18, 07:57 AM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by maddmaxx View Post
Great thread Jppe. I've always enjoyed build my own bikes. The sense of accomplishment is strong.

One tip that might be worth a try. In addition to bikes I still race RC race cars and there is a finish treatment for carbon frames. We treat the cut edges of the chassis plate with thin CA glue to seal the cut and to prevent de-lamination. I have not had the opportunity to try this yet as I haven't used a fork with a carbon steerer tube yet. Perhaps someone else has heard of this and can comment. On the cars, just a couple of drops spread along the cut surface with a toothpick is all it takes. Just don't get heavy handed a create a build up on the outside of the steerer tube.
Interesting idea. I can visualize the de-lamination. Iíve never experienced it being an issue with a steerer tube, perhaps itís the way the carbon is built up and then the excess resin removed under pressure??? Something to watch for though.
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Old 01-09-18, 10:26 AM
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You're going to love riding that beautiful bike. I had the pleasure of helping build up a Lynskey GR250 for a friend who I ride gravel roads with fairly often. He loves his bike. He says it really smooths out the bumpy roads.

He also went with mechanical Ultegra with hydraulic discs. He's running a 11-36 cassette which works perfectly with the Ultegra mid-cage RD. He went with a White Industries R30 crank. Initially he ran 32/48 rings, but later he switched to 28/46. He also uses that same Easton EC70 handlebar. We've put those on a couple of custom gravel bikes for customers and they both are happy with them.

He runs Panaracer Gravel King SK 35mm tires tubeless. On his 25mm inner width rims, they measure 40mm. There are lots of good gravel tires around nowdays. You can probably get better advice on what works for the terrain near you from local riders. My preference is to go big and definitely go tubeless.

I just saw this about a possible way to get 30/46 chainrings on your Ultegra crank. https://www.bikerumor.com/2018/01/09...ct-chainrings/

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Old 01-09-18, 11:26 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by jppe View Post
Here are the tires I plan to use initially. Until I ride the bike on different roads I just don't know what I'll eventually use but these should get me started. I generally prefer Continental 4000sII (or latest model) on my road bikes so I picked up some 700x28s. Those should be great for mostly road and a little dirt. Heck, I could probably run 25s but with the 28 mm outside diameter of the rims that just seems strange.

I also got some Kenda Happy Medium 700x35 mm tires thinking those might be good to start with on the more "gravely rides". I had a hard time deciding on 32s, 35s and 40s but opted for the 35s. My clearances allow me to ride up to a 45 tire. My buddy rides 40 tubeless and loves it. Who knows, I might get there one day but you have to start somewhere.

I think the 35s should be pretty versatile on the trail rides I have in mind. They shouldn't be that gravely, muddy or hilly so these should fit the bill.

Anybody running gravel tires they especially like?


IMG_0479 by joe price, on Flickr
I don't have a lot of gravel miles yet. There's essentially no gravel roads within 90 minutes from here, just some mountain bike trails in parks.

I ran similar 35mm tires, Clement USH, on a mixed trail and road ride. They were quite good in both parts of the ride. I did slow down for downhill curves on the road, since I didn't have a good feel for the grip when leaning into a turn with these tires.

The trail (Virginia Creeper Trail -- recommended!) had some rounded rocks sticking up from the crushed stone surface on the 2-3% downhills, due to some erosion. The 35mm tires didn't really cushion these impacts, my arms and shoulders were a bit sore. So, for bad washboards or other large bumps, the biggest tires that fit would be good.

Those GP4000S 28mm might measure close to 31-33mm on your wide rims. I have GP4000S 25mm on my similar width rims, and they measure 29mm. At 170 pounds, I typically use around 65psi front, 80 psi rear. It's very good on bumpy roads, and good on maintained crushed stone trails.

Originally Posted by maddmaxx View Post
Great thread Jppe. I've always enjoyed build my own bikes. The sense of accomplishment is strong.

One tip that might be worth a try. In addition to bikes I still race RC race cars and there is a finish treatment for carbon frames. We treat the cut edges of the chassis plate with thin CA glue to seal the cut and to prevent de-lamination. I have not had the opportunity to try this yet as I haven't used a fork with a carbon steerer tube yet. Perhaps someone else has heard of this and can comment. On the cars, just a couple of drops spread along the cut surface with a toothpick is all it takes. Just don't get heavy handed a create a build up on the outside of the steerer tube.
Steerer tubes are very dense with carbon, and very strong. I don't think the edges need treatment. I cut a small ring off the top of my steerer to reduce the height a little, and even this narrow ring is very stiff -- impressive.

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Old 01-09-18, 03:14 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by BluesDawg View Post
You're going to love riding that beautiful bike. I had the pleasure of helping build up a Lynskey GR250 for a friend who I ride gravel roads with fairly often. He loves his bike. He says it really smooths out the bumpy roads.

He also went with mechanical Ultegra with hydraulic discs. He's running a 11-36 cassette which works perfectly with the Ultegra mid-cage RD. He went with a White Industries R30 crank. Initially he ran 32/48 rings, but later he switched to 28/46. He also uses that same Easton EC70 handlebar. We've put those on a couple of custom gravel bikes for customers and they both are happy with them.

He runs Panaracer Gravel King SK 35mm tires tubeless. On his 25mm inner width rims, they measure 40mm. There are lots of good gravel tires around nowdays. You can probably get better advice on what works for the terrain near you from local riders. My preference is to go big and definitely go tubeless.

I just saw this about a possible way to get 30/46 chainrings on your Ultegra crank. https://www.bikerumor.com/2018/01/09...ct-chainrings/

Thanks Benny!! Those chainrings might just be what I'm looking for.
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Old 01-09-18, 05:35 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by jppe View Post
Interesting idea. I can visualize the de-lamination. Iíve never experienced it being an issue with a steerer tube, perhaps itís the way the carbon is built up and then the excess resin removed under pressure??? Something to watch for though.
You and RM RF may be correct. Our RC chassis plates are made for lightness and have routed edges. Steerer tubes may be more dense.
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Old 01-20-18, 09:43 AM
  #31  
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This build has been a real adventure and continues that way. The shifters and brakes FINALLY came yesterday. It took 4 weeks for delivery from Europe.

Iím still waiting on the rims and itís also been a month since purchase. The Chinese manufacturer continues to communicate with me regularly but they arenít getting any information from the carrier.

In the meantime my gravel buddy who was going to assist me by building the wheels and assembling the brakes has some unexpected personal challenges and wonít be available to help for a while. I have another source I can use so hopefully that will pan out.

How does the saying go.......ĒAnything worth having is worth waiting forĒ????
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Old 02-07-18, 11:09 AM
  #32  
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I've been working on the bike off and on. I didn't feel any urgency as I was waiting on the wheels. The carbon rims from China FINALLY came in Monday (took 6 weeks) so I took them to my wheel builder yesterday. Good news on that issue as well. He worked out his issues and is now back building wheels so I'm and really thankful about that.

I have made so many screw ups it's just hilarious. You would certainly think you could tell the difference between cable and hydraulic brake housing????? It was really early in the morning but that's just no excuse.....and when you forget to remove the plunger in the fluid container that sits on top of the brakes it will blow the syringe house off the brake and guess what happens to all the fluid you are pushing out???? I'm just glad my wife didn't see me wiping up all the oil off our new hardwood floors???

I watched numerous videos multiple times on YouTube about bleeding brakes. I read the Shimano Dealer Manual instructions on installing fluid numerous times and TRIED to take it step by step. If the manual said to do something 3-4 times I literally did it 30-40 just to get all the air out of the lines.....

Here is some of the work in progress:

Correct Stack Height for me at their max of 35 mm. Now I just need to cut the steerer tube.

IMG_0519 by joe price, on Flickr

Rear Derailleur installed

IMG_0514 by joe price, on Flickr

IMG_0515 by joe price, on Flickr

Shifter cable installed. It took me forever to determine where to start threading it through the shifter. Why is ever model so different?????

IMG_0512 by joe price, on Flickr

IMG_0517 by joe price, on Flickr

Front Brake with Adapter for Post Mounted brakes to a Flat Mounted frame

IMG_0520 by joe price, on Flickr

Here is the rear brake and adapter. Note that the one screw is hitting the bottom of the brake body and is too long for this setup. I had to get another M5 screw with a hex head that was a little shorter....Home Depot

IMG_0523 by joe price, on Flickr
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Old 02-07-18, 11:16 AM
  #33  
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Brake housing installed on the front brake

IMG_0526 by joe price, on Flickr

Routing of the brake housing through the front Lynskey fork. Cool!!

IMG_0527 by joe price, on Flickr

Both the brake and cable housing coming out of the shifter-this looks to be the rear.

IMG_0528 by joe price, on Flickr

Hope RS4 Hubs---24 front and 28 rear spokes

IMG_0539 by joe price, on Flickr

Light-Bicycle Rims. I think they are 28 mm wide on the outside diameter and 38 mm deep. Should be really stable.

IMG_0542 by joe price, on Flickr
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Old 02-07-18, 11:27 AM
  #34  
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THE HYDRAULIC BRAKE BLEED!!!!

Nobody tells you about the recessed cap in the bottle......until you punch a hole in it and it comes out with the ice pick????
IMG_0549 by joe price, on Flickr

IMG_0551 by joe price, on Flickr

On the 685 brakes you need to tilt the holding cup so the brake cylinder just below the cup fills up with less air in the cylinder

IMG_0547 by joe price, on Flickr

Bleeding fluid from the front brake

IMG_0546 by joe price, on Flickr

One of the last steps is to level the cup, press the brake lever and open and release the bleed screw on the brake itself. This helps to remove more of the air in the lines.

IMG_0545 by joe price, on Flickr

I duct taped the rear brake to my workstand to keep it low and also so I could reach the rear brake lever while I was moving the bleed screw. It worked pretty good!! Except there was a good bit of tape residue I had to remove from the outside of the brakes????

IMG_0548 by joe price, on Flickr

The bike is now ready for wheels!! I have left the brake block in the brakes for the time being. Just in case there are leaks in the lines and I need to bleed the brakes again. Putting the brake pads in the brakes shouldn't take very long......says me

IMG_0554 by joe price, on Flickr
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Old 02-07-18, 02:26 PM
  #35  
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I want a disc Lynskey .... I do not want to bleed brakes. Life is tough.
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