Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

Race style bike

Reply

Old 05-29-18, 04:58 PM
  #1  
Steeljag
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Central Fl
Posts: 19

Bikes: Trek 2.3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Race style bike

Hello 50 plusers,

How many of you are one race style bikes ? Iím mid 50s and am very seriously looking at a Giant TCR. Iíve been on endurance style bikes on and off for several years, and have averaged just over 2000mi a year for the last three. My normal loop ride is 26 miles on pretty decent roads.

Between cycling and the gym I try to keep myself in pretty good shape ! However, I am concerned about the aggressive positioning for that bike. I do plan to be fitted if I do get it !

i plan to keep my current bikes, and am just looking for a faster / lighter / nicer toy....I mean bike !

Thank you!





Steeljag is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-18, 07:04 PM
  #2  
bruce19
Senior Member
 
bruce19's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lebanon (Liberty Hill), CT
Posts: 5,466

Bikes: MASI Gran Criterium S, Colnago World Cup CX & Guru steel

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 547 Post(s)
This?
bruce19 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-18, 07:16 PM
  #3  
RonH
Life is good
 
RonH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Not far from the Withlacoochee Trail. 🚴🏻
Posts: 18,082

Bikes: 2001 Litespeed Tuscany, 2018 Lynskey Helix Pro

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 476 Post(s)
I'm 73 and all the bikes I've had in the past 18 years have been road bikes (formerly called racing bikes) except the CX bikes I owned. Here's my latest (only a few weeks old).


BTW: Have you visited the Southeast Regional subforum to meet the locals? I'm in west central Florida.
__________________
The LORD is merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and plenteous in mercy. - Psalm 103:8

Last edited by RonH; 05-29-18 at 07:20 PM.
RonH is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-18, 07:17 PM
  #4  
OldsCOOL
Senior Member
 
OldsCOOL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: northern michigan
Posts: 12,247

Bikes: '77 Colnago Super, '76 Fuji The Finest, '88 Cannondale Criterium, '86 Trek 760, '87 Miyata 712

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 363 Post(s)
I ride racers, it’s a quirk of my personality. My main rider is an 88 Cannondale Criterium Series with a reputation.

Bike fit is very important. The Cdale fits me so well it feels like it’s part of my body. Handling is intuitive. You think, it turns. I’m a 60yr old that still likes to go fast.
OldsCOOL is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-18, 07:37 PM
  #5  
BobbyG
Senior Member
 
BobbyG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 3,479

Bikes: 2015 Charge Plug, 1997 Nishiki Blazer, 1984 Nishiki International

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 552 Post(s)
I'm 56. Been bike commuting 26 years. For the last 10 years I've favored road bikes...they're just more comfortable to me now and riding on the hoods works better for my wrists and hands. The drop bars allow for varied hand positions. The forward position is kinder to my back and hind quarters (and I assume my prostate since I haven't had some of the more typical issues). I ride my straight-bar MTB based commuter in the snow and now and then in the warmer months, but I have the bars thrown forward and inboard bar ends to approximate "the hoods". As you know from reading the 50+ forum some older riders can no longer ride the style of bike they used to or want to. I'm hoping you will be as comfortable on your road bike as I am on mine.
BobbyG is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-18, 08:22 PM
  #6  
caloso
Packfodding 3
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Posts: 36,730

Bikes: Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper

Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1279 Post(s)
Yes. 2016 Specialized Tarmac.


caloso is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-18, 10:01 PM
  #7  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 6,716

Bikes: Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel, Centurion Ironman Expert

Mentioned: 102 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1877 Post(s)
Yup, one of my three bikes is an '89 Centurion Ironman, a good example of a mid-range '80s race bike. But it took me two years of hard work at reconditioning to be able to ride a drop bar road bike (I was recovering from neck and back injuries from an old car wreck).

I wouldn't say it's my favorite bike, although I rode it more than any other bike the past year. The fairly aggressive position was tolerable for 20-30 mile rides. Beyond that it got uncomfortable and after 50 miles almost too painful.

My next bike will be a more relaxed drop bar bike, closer to a touring or less aggressive position for longer rides. And I may modify one of my hybrids for that kind of ride. It's already pretty close to what I'm looking for, needing mainly a different handlebar.
canklecat is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-18, 10:15 PM
  #8  
jon c. 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 3,111
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 611 Post(s)
I'm another who finds the race style much more comfortable. Easier on the wrists, arms and back.
jon c. is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-18, 06:08 AM
  #9  
BlazingPedals
Senior Member
 
BlazingPedals's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middle of da Mitten
Posts: 10,282

Bikes: Trek 7500, RANS V-Rex, Optima Baron, Velokraft NoCom, M-5 Carbon Highracer, homebuilt recumbent

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 612 Post(s)
I think this counts as "race style."




Someday, maybe I'll get a more-nearly-normal bike and act my age. Nah.
BlazingPedals is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-18, 08:32 AM
  #10  
Steeljag
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Central Fl
Posts: 19

Bikes: Trek 2.3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Thank you all for your info and thoughts ! The riding positions of the road bikes I have now, and the TCR (which is getting most of my attention now) appear similar, but a few CM here,and few CM there really do add up ! The LBS does not have one for a test ride.

Bruce19 - Yes, same frame, but the Adv Pro 1 model.

Ron H - I’m in N. central Fl ( Deland area) . I will check out that forum. If your area is Mt. Dora / Sugar Loaf Mt, Thrill Hill, I’ve ridden there a few times !

Old school - I do plan on a bike fit, and do want to be comfortable!

Bobby G - My current bikes are road bikes with drops, just not as aggressive as the TCR.

Caloso - Nice pic !

Canklecat - Exactly my concern in being uncomfortable, and the aggressive positioning causing pain. I ride to have fun, get good exercise, and have more FUN ! I’ve been around those guys and girls who when stopping at “break zones”, get off their bikes, reach for their lower backs & shoulders..... moaning and groaning !

Blazing Pedals - Does that have a fridge on it ? Haha !

Steeljag is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-18, 09:19 AM
  #11  
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 18,750

Bikes: 1959 Capo; 1980 Peugeot PKN-10; 1981 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 524 Post(s)

All four of my road bikes have "racing style" drop handlebars, although only the Bianchi has what might be considered a racing geometry today. The Capo Sieger was designed and built as a racing machine, but its somewhat slack frame geometry would be considered sports touring today.

My mountain bike has regular straight-across Ritchey mountain bars, to which I added short perpendicular end extensions to give me additional hand positions similar to those provided by drop bars.
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324
Capo: 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-18, 02:23 PM
  #12  
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 19,038

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 65 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1155 Post(s)
I figure anything the racers use to go faster, I can use so I don't have to work so hard.
JohnDThompson is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-18, 02:36 PM
  #13  
caloso
Packfodding 3
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Posts: 36,730

Bikes: Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper

Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1279 Post(s)
Originally Posted by BlazingPedals View Post
I think this counts as "race style."




Someday, maybe I'll get a more-nearly-normal bike and act my age. Nah.
Are there recumbent races? I don't think I've ever seen one. I'd guess they would be TTs, not mass starts.
caloso is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-18, 04:41 PM
  #14  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,005
Mentioned: 94 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5678 Post(s)
I've been riding bikes with drop bars since I was 8 or 10 years old.

Now in my low 50's... and too late to change now.

A couple of years ago, I moved from the late 60's vintage road bike style to a bit more modern with more handlebar drop. It took a few weeks to get used to, but I think the road bikes do help with flexibility.

I even tried a Funny bike with lots of bar drop.

CliffordK is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-18, 07:05 PM
  #15  
BlazingPedals
Senior Member
 
BlazingPedals's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middle of da Mitten
Posts: 10,282

Bikes: Trek 7500, RANS V-Rex, Optima Baron, Velokraft NoCom, M-5 Carbon Highracer, homebuilt recumbent

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 612 Post(s)
Originally Posted by caloso View Post
Are there recumbent races? I don't think I've ever seen one. I'd guess they would be TTs, not mass starts.
Yes, there is a series around the Great Lakes States every summer. Events run from serious to not. They tend to be mostly social gatherings, and racing is just the 'excuse' for it. I'm firmly between the podium guys and the flower-sniffers - I've never made the podium, but OTOH I'll quintuple-lap some of the other guys. I've taken several other bikes to the events, but never this one.
BlazingPedals is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-18, 07:22 PM
  #16  
Steeljag
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Central Fl
Posts: 19

Bikes: Trek 2.3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Thanks again everyone ! I ordered the Giant TCR today from my LBS !
Steeljag is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-18, 08:26 PM
  #17  
TiHabanero
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 1,124
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
BlazingPedals, do you stick to bike paths or ride on public roads as well? How much does the chain weigh, and is there ever a need to change it? Probably doesn't see much stretch, does it? Total weight of bike?
TiHabanero is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-18, 07:14 AM
  #18  
rob214
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: nola area
Posts: 229

Bikes: 2017 giant TCR

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 61 Post(s)
I'll be 56 tomorrow and I love my TCR, had a defy before and I really love the tcr.
rob214 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-18, 09:30 AM
  #19  
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 18,750

Bikes: 1959 Capo; 1980 Peugeot PKN-10; 1981 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 524 Post(s)
Originally Posted by TiHabanero View Post
BlazingPedals ... How much does the chain weigh, and is there ever a need to change it? Probably doesn't see much stretch, does it? Total weight of bike?
I would expect his chain to wear about the same as any of ours, meaning that when 24 half-links exceed 12-1/16" in length, it is time to replace it.
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324
Capo: 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-18, 11:51 AM
  #20  
BlazingPedals
Senior Member
 
BlazingPedals's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middle of da Mitten
Posts: 10,282

Bikes: Trek 7500, RANS V-Rex, Optima Baron, Velokraft NoCom, M-5 Carbon Highracer, homebuilt recumbent

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 612 Post(s)
Originally Posted by John E View Post
I would expect his chain to wear about the same as any of ours, meaning that when 24 half-links exceed 12-1/16" in length, it is time to replace it.
Wear is spread across more links, so, while it takes 3 chains at a time, the chains last about 3 times as long.

Also, I ride almost exclusively on county roads, the type that may or may not have a shoulder or a center line (or a fog line.)
BlazingPedals is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-18, 01:10 PM
  #21  
Steeljag
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Central Fl
Posts: 19

Bikes: Trek 2.3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Originally Posted by rob214 View Post
I'll be 56 tomorrow and I love my TCR, had a defy before and I really love the tcr.
Thanks Rob, Iím looking forward to it and slowly getting used to the ďstretchĒ. ......and Happy Birthday !
Steeljag is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-18, 01:16 PM
  #22  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 13,816

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 72 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2988 Post(s)
I ride all kinds of road bikes. One of the things I appreciate about older road bikes (say from the 70s or so) is that most of them can take a pretty fat tire (at least a 28c if not a 32c; modern bikes are moving to wider tires as well for good reason. Personally I'd avoid a road bike that can't take at least a 28c tire.
bikemig is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-18, 06:18 PM
  #23  
BlazingPedals
Senior Member
 
BlazingPedals's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middle of da Mitten
Posts: 10,282

Bikes: Trek 7500, RANS V-Rex, Optima Baron, Velokraft NoCom, M-5 Carbon Highracer, homebuilt recumbent

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 612 Post(s)
Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
I ride all kinds of road bikes. One of the things I appreciate about older road bikes (say from the 70s or so) is that most of them can take a pretty fat tire (at least a 28c if not a 32c; modern bikes are moving to wider tires as well for good reason. Personally I'd avoid a road bike that can't take at least a 28c tire.
If you have wider tires, you need narrower ones for more speed on smooth pavement. If you have narrow ones, you need wider ones to handle rough pavement. Plus you need a 650B bike for those times when a 559mm wheel is too short but a 622mm wheel is too tall. I assume everyone here can spell "marketing."
BlazingPedals is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-18, 06:18 AM
  #24  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 13,816

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 72 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2988 Post(s)
Originally Posted by BlazingPedals View Post
If you have wider tires, you need narrower ones for more speed on smooth pavement. If you have narrow ones, you need wider ones to handle rough pavement. Plus you need a 650B bike for those times when a 559mm wheel is too short but a 622mm wheel is too tall. I assume everyone here can spell "marketing."
I agree that a lot of this is just marketing BS. At the end of the day you just need a bike that you like. That said, tire width makes a difference in terms of the different road surfaces you can ride on comfortably. I find a road racing bike with a 28c tire to be more comfortable and more capable than one with a skinnier tire.

I'm fixing up a 1972 Fuji Finest which was a top dog bike way back in the day. That bike can take a 32c tire no problem. I'd like to do an "eroica" ride and the 32c tires will come in handy for the gravel portions of the ride.
bikemig is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-18, 09:52 AM
  #25  
caloso
Packfodding 3
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Posts: 36,730

Bikes: Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper

Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1279 Post(s)
Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
I ride all kinds of road bikes. One of the things I appreciate about older road bikes (say from the 70s or so) is that most of them can take a pretty fat tire (at least a 28c if not a 32c; modern bikes are moving to wider tires as well for good reason. Personally I'd avoid a road bike that can't take at least a 28c tire.
70s yes. In the 80s, tolerances got much tighter for race bikes. 25mm is the biggest I can fit in my 86 Gazelle.
caloso is online now  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Terms of Service