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Retirement. What does it mean?

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Retirement. What does it mean?

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Old 06-30-18, 10:41 PM
  #26  
themp
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I can relate to your feelings right now as I felt the same when I retired. I had always been healthy, but one year into retirement I had a health issue that showed me the light. Meaning I was a half empty kind of person, but after the health issue, I became a half full person and have not looked back. I do believe the health issue was a message to me after being a workaholic for 38 years. I am thankful that it gave me the wake up call to finish my life on the positive. No more moping around for me.
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Old 07-01-18, 03:34 PM
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Congratulations Deacon Mark! Good for you knowing when it was time to step away.

Not much to add other than my 2 years of retirement has been about perfect for me. I still pretty much have a daily routine but except for the random unexpected issues with one of my adult kids that pops from time to time life is great. I don’t know about you but I had to learn how to put things off???? For me routine is good but also very flexible. I’m doing things I enjoy, plus keep me both mentally and physically challenged.

I’m fortunate to have a very solid financial plan and in fact will become even stronger when I start receiving Social Security benefits at age 70.

Another thought is I think it’s great to plan “bucket list” activities for yourself annually. Whether it’s trips, family get togethers, renewal of friendships etc. those are healthy and rewarding. Planning and experiencing the activities are a blast.

If if you ever need a sounding board to bounce retirement questions and ideas around I’d be happy to oblige. Enjoy!!!
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Old 07-01-18, 04:17 PM
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I can't wait until I can retire. Looks like 62 will be the earliest for me.
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Old 07-01-18, 04:19 PM
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I live in Illinois, I have to keep working to pay for my family's health insurance, IL property taxes and my 4th kid's college. Three kids in and out of college and/or grad school, one to go.

I am 58 and operate a small business. My retirement will occur 2047 (assuming the state draws down its debt), otherwise I will probably work until 2055 or death which ever comes first.

Congrats to all who have had the good fortune to retire at an early age and enjoy life.
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Old 07-01-18, 07:32 PM
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Originally Posted by JGM411 View Post
I live in Illinois, I have to keep working to pay for my family's health insurance, IL property taxes and my 4th kid's college. Three kids in and out of college and/or grad school, one to go.

I am 58 and operate a small business. My retirement will occur 2047 (assuming the state draws down its debt), otherwise I will probably work until 2055 or death which ever comes first.

Congrats to all who have had the good fortune to retire at an early age and enjoy life.
Counting down the days, yet? Hang in there. Maybe something completely unexpected will happen - in a good way.
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Old 07-01-18, 08:15 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by jppe View Post

I’m fortunate to have a very solid financial plan and in fact will become even stronger when I start receiving Social Security benefits at age 70.


Why waiting so long? I know you'll get more monthly, but maybe less lifetime total. I figure it makes sense to take the smaller amounts as early as possible and invest it if you don't need it.
Here's what my chart looks like, and this is without any interest or earnings.



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Old 07-01-18, 10:23 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by John E View Post
Patriot1, that blueberry smoothie looks mighty good. Berries are one of those foods that provide superb health benefits while being a delight to the eye and the palate.
Thanks John, they are really outstanding and usually breakfast before a early morning ride. Really special knowing they are home grown by my wife and I.
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Old 07-02-18, 05:39 AM
  #33  
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I'm still working at, soon to be, 65 years old. While I can't say I love my job I am quite fortunate in that it's comparatively low stress, the people I work with are quite nice, the pay and benefits are good and, I can work at home so that saves me a lot of time every day in commuting, bathing, and getting dressed :-). While we're in good shape financially, I do have a few things I have to keep an eye on, financially, that I've chosen to assume responsibility for (family stuff). Fortunately, I've been able to keep a pretty good balance throughout my work-life. Traveled quite a bit, never missed kid's events, and am able to put in a good number of cycling miles each year - approaching 4,500 miles/year the past few years - not too bad factoring in age and winter months/reduced mileage. But the thing that terrifies me most about retiring is the list of projects I'll be expected to take on around the house. I get some slack while I'm working full time - it's understood that riding is my personal therapy and primary leisure activity. Once I retire, there will be untold pressure to actually be useful around the house
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Old 07-02-18, 12:13 PM
  #34  
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I retired at 66 and moved to N.C. from upstate N.Y. We had bought the house in NC five years earlier and had paid off the house in NY twenty years before that. My idea was to not have any bills, mortgage, car payment, etc, when we retired and live off our SS. That way I did not have to touch our IRA's or other holdings until forced to. That has all worked out fine as our combined SS is considerably less than our monthly expenses so if we don't get stupid it will last our life time. My issue was the sudden change in my responsibilities as I owned a residential plumbing business and was on call 24 hrs a day 7 days a week. With all the extra time my mind had nothing to occupy itself and I had issues from my youth and time in SEA come screaming back to the forefront. Was not a combat solider but stationed in UT Thailand USAF, and it all worked against my mental health. Riding has given me an outlet and joy I had missed for years without knowing it would. That and the help I am getting from the Va. has me looking to enjoy life soon. When I can't ride I have an elliptical and weights-bands to get in a workout. This and the changes I have been making to the house, grandchildren, and hobbies have given me a better outlook than I had four years ago when I retired and moved here. I do not know of any "secret" advice to give except find what you enjoy and do not look at what others have done as one size does not fit all. I hope you find enjoyment and peace with your retirement.
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Old 07-02-18, 12:32 PM
  #35  
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More put out to pasture, decrepitude set in, than put in Stud.
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Old 07-02-18, 08:42 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by DiabloScott View Post

Why waiting so long? I know you'll get more monthly, but maybe less lifetime total. I figure it makes sense to take the smaller amounts as early as possible and invest it if you don't need it.
Here's what my chart looks like, and this is without any interest or earnings.


For me, It’s just one part of an overall financial plan and factoring in required minimum distributions from IRAs, other income etc. Fortunately I don’t need the income at present. It also had a higher growth rate and overall return higher than other “guaranteed financial options”. My wife is also a good bit younger than me so if you assume she’ll outlive me starting the higher amount a little later gives her a little more income after I go to cycling heaven!!
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Old 07-02-18, 08:57 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by JGM411 View Post
I live in Illinois

I will probably work until 2055 or death which ever comes first.
Ditto
Like I said in a previous post, I'm 60 and now I am starting to actually like working and what I do. The past 30 years were kinda crappy. Worked with excruciating back pain for many of those years. Self diagnosed and treated the problem in the last year and am now as pain free as I can be. I can actually work painfree all day. And cycling....feel amazing on the bike. But yeah, retirement isn't an option.
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Old 07-02-18, 09:20 PM
  #38  
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At 60, I'd retire tomorrow if I could. I'm hoping for 62, but my investment advisor doesn't seem to think that's a realistic dream.
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Old 07-02-18, 11:50 PM
  #39  
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Never put off for tomorrow what you can do the day after.

Takes some time to “learn how to retire”
Everyone is different.

Common theme, do what you enjoy,
but do.
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Old 07-03-18, 08:31 AM
  #40  
vinfix
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The bike club I used to ride with had many active early retirees, including it's president. He used to say "Save your money" (to be able to retire), and "Gotta save something for tomorrow" (pace your schedule, don't try to do everything in one day).

Both my father and brother retired early from long tech careers at big corporations. I'm mid-50's, and used to think I would, too, but both my personal life and career have been much more checkered with changes in wives and jobs. I've had periods of "early retirement", layoffs where I had plenty of time to ride, catch up on things, and consider my options. I had zero problem finding things to do, but financially I couldn't get used to the idea of transitioning from "saver" to "spender". Somehow after 3-6 months I always came back to the same kind of engineering work... most recently, last year I was laid off & rehired. Good thing, too, as my younger wife was pregnant with our now 9 month old daughter. Now I think I'll retire when she goes off to school- elementary, I can't wait 'til college!
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Old 07-03-18, 09:56 AM
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Been in tech for several decades, now at a school running the department. Turning 65 in November. Just one school year to go, 362 days...I will graduate with the class of 2019!
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Old 07-03-18, 04:36 PM
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I retired 10 years ago when I was 60. I would have retired earlier than that if I could have, but I needed more years in the system to qualify for retirement benefits. I like my work (English teacher/prof.) but I like not working and getting paid much better. Diminished physical abilities have not hampered my outdoor life. I still bike, hike, ski and walk. I do everything more slowly and with less stamina, but life has never been better. As I tell my friends, since I retired I have felt completely free for the first time in my life. When people ask what I do to keep busy I tell them the truth. Nothing. I don't like being busy. I do things that need to be done and that give me pleasure. I also love to do nothing. Now that you are retired you can do what you like. Congratulations!
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Old 07-03-18, 06:07 PM
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Originally Posted by justtrying View Post
I have been thinking about retirement a lot for the last 10 days or so. I retired from my first job in 07 after over 26 yrs& have been working my 2nd job for the last 10. I will be 65 this yr & my youngest just finished college. The dilemma in my mind is I like working but I want to retire while II can still bike and golf.
I am 56, retired a few years ago. It has been great. Been remodeling the house, riding road and mtn bikes, SCUBA diving, rock climbing, backpacking, running. I am super busy and it has been great.
Work was stressful and it took me almost a full year to stop thinking about work related stuff.
I encourage anyone who can swing it to do so.
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Old 07-03-18, 09:45 PM
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Retirement means no more Dick Rushhour and Jane Wolfpack to contend with, and I can drink my morning coffee much slower, plus have another one if I choose.
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Old 07-03-18, 10:04 PM
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After twenty with the Army and just shy of fifteen with the local PD, I called it quits at 58. I was ready. It just wasn't fun or challenging anymore. It was a bit scary for the first several weeks. Then I started substitute teaching and have really found my niche. I try to sub with middle schoolers as much as possible. They keep me on my toes and help keep my mind young. I still have the option to take time off when I want. For me it really is the best of both worlds combined.
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Old 07-03-18, 10:49 PM
  #46  
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I retired at 62 1/2 and took early social security benefits. I had Cobra medical insurance for two years until I could get Medicare at age 65. Also, a small annuity pension from a former employer kicked in at age 65. In my case I had no dependents and owned my home, so my basic expenses were low enough that I could get by on my pensions and just use my savings for discretionary luxuries. I didn’t even touch my IRAs and 401K until I was required by law at age 70 1/2. Last week I turned 72, so it’s been nearly ten years now since I retired, and I have never regretted my decision. I am just as busy today as when I was working, but instead of spending time in an office or enduring a stressful and sometimes dangerous commute, I am doing things that I enjoy on my own schedule. So to me, retirement simply means a change in priorities and activities, where the need to work for money is no longer a necessity.
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I'd like to think i have as much money as brains.
I see the light at the end of the tunnel, but the tunnel keeps getting longer - me
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Old 07-04-18, 12:54 PM
  #47  
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Retirement means 1) I don't have to ride in a bad weather again . 2) I will never , ever , get a speeding ticket again . 3) I receive my pension cheque+ dividends from my investment each month . Life is good .
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Old 07-04-18, 02:27 PM
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Retirement is like being a teenager between the 11th and the 12th grade. You have a car a little money, and you can do what ever you want to do. Oh and when you want to do it.
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Old 07-04-18, 03:56 PM
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Damm I hat sounds like what I told my Dad over 40+ years ago. He asked me what age I like to be & I stated 14 but with a drivers license. Maybe dreams do come through 😁
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Old 07-05-18, 02:47 PM
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Coincidentally at exactly 5 p.m. tomorrow I join you..... I try not to bother thinking ahead too much. Looking forward to the change actually........ Whatever will be will be....
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