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Old fart, new ways

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Old 07-03-18, 12:08 PM
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rsn48
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Old fart, new ways

So I'm a bit of a whoosie and I haven't biked in a long time, true to other experiences here. My first bike bought in Chicago in roughly 1969 was a Raleigh Super Course, a bike I dearly loved. Then onto a Schwinn, a bike I dearly did not like, then onto other road bikes, then mountain bikes, then ceased riding when my hips deteriorated (pain) and two hips replaced. On top of that, I gained weight up to 320 pounds and became very inactive. Fast forward to today at 70 years old, I've lost 110 pounds but still need to lose more, but because of the weight loss I am much more active, average 12000 Fitbit steps a day and now am returning to bicycling. I have my old mountain bike - a 1988 Ritchey Ascent Comp - which I've just had work done on to bring it back to life. I will be using this bike to "get back in the saddle" so to speak and retrieve old biking skills (what little I had) and to build up miles, legs, lungs, arms, back and bum. I recently purchased a 2010 Specialized Tarmac Comp which I have not test ridden, but my trusty bike freak son did and gave it a thumbs up. I don't plan to go anywhere near that bike for a couple of months until I've improved the above listed items (e.g. miles, lungs.....).

Currently I have no desire to be clipless on either bike, but I do have my old pedal cage on my Ritchey bike which I will be using. Yesterday I bought a pair of Five Ten Free Riders to use on my mountain bike; these fit into the pedal cage easier than my running shoes. For my Specialized I have read elsewhere that some prefer to use a cross country mountain bike clipless system on their road bike, more comfortable to walk in, you can get fairly light ones now and they work great. So I'm curious to hear from those who have tried both XC mountain bike clipless and road bike clipless, what is your experience.
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Old 07-03-18, 12:30 PM
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Wildwood 
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If you are tall, there is an early 70's (1973, I think) Raleigh Super Course for sale over on C&V Sales (very inexpensively). It's a frame+fork+headset+seatpost. Standard BB, so could be outfitted any way you desire - old school or with integrated brakes/shifters.

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Old 07-03-18, 01:03 PM
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sevenmag
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I have soho pedals from Nashbar on my fat bike because I use it for more than just exercise and trail riding. I do like the mountain shoes better but I don't ever see myself giving up the road shoes. For whatever reason they feel much more secure and I feel like I get a better power to road transfer.
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Old 07-03-18, 06:57 PM
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Sadly I am not tall, 5 foot 9 inches, a 54 cm frame suits me well so I will have to pass up the Raleigh bike.
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Old 07-03-18, 07:58 PM
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The first "performance" bike I owned was a 69 Super Course. Absolutely loved that bike. Lived in the Bay Area at the time and climbed the Oakland hills plenty of times without trouble. It was brown with Nervar cottered crank, which I promptly replaced with Shimano 600EX. Still have the EX crank in use on a different bike. You will be happy that you returned to the party!
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Old 07-03-18, 11:19 PM
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I talked to another owner of the same era Super Course and he claimed they had a reputation of "shuddering" at high speed descents, I never experienced that. You could argue that Chicago is flat and no place for steep hill riding, but I then moved to Vancouver, British Columbia and the North Shore, which is all mountains. Deep Cove mountain bike store was within a few blocks of where I lived. Out of this store, one owner developed Kona and the other owner (I think there were three or four owners) developed Rocky Mountain bikes.
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Old 07-04-18, 02:22 AM
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For most recrearional riders,It isn't necessary to attach your foot to the pedal. Trained racers might get 1or 2 percent more power when climbing, but for most people clips or clipless pedals only serve to make one look like a pro. Of course there are exceptions to this statement; some riders are helped by having the foot fixed in one position. But then there are tose that need a variety of foot positions.
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Old 07-04-18, 05:08 AM
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I have clipless on my road bike, ratty old cages on my frankenbike, and new studded, flat platform on my MTB bike (removed eggbeater). Each bike morphed through all three pedal sets...largely due to my confidence level and the primary use of the bike. I have a set of Ultegra carbon pedals for my road bike (Domane), but am still using spd touring pedals on it as they are easier to breakout of and I don't like walking in the super flat/stiff/slick shoes. I like the clipless on the road bike and after a year am getting the hang of complete circles with some pull of my legs on the upstrokes...less mashing. I recommend you do what makes you most comfortable and allows you to build miles without drama...wanting to ride is key.
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Old 07-04-18, 10:56 AM
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I started out with cheap Shimano clips and cheap shoes for my MTB. It worked well.

I upgraded to Sidi shoes and expensive MTB cleats for my road bike. They worked well.

I further upgraded, for reasons unknown but time will tell, to Shimano Road cleats. They worked well but they had problems. The Uber-stiff shoes gave me plantar fasciitis. The plastic cleats aren’t durable. The footing sucks even when you wear cleats covers. I had a nasty slip-and-fall with them once.

I now have gone back the MTB cleats and spiffy M647 pedals. I forgot my (still very serviceable) Sidis today and had to ride in my loafers. It wasn’t my first choice, but it was adequate.
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Old 07-04-18, 11:22 AM
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I'm fine with platform pedals and half-clips on my road bike, and just platforms on my SS/fixed gear. It's true that clipless could help "efficiency" by a small amount, and fit in better in group rides, but that's not enough to induce me to give up the other advantages of platforms.
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