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I woke up one day I was OLD !!!

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I woke up one day I was OLD !!!

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Old 07-13-18, 09:52 PM
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TBeghtol 
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I woke up one day and I was OLD !!!

Howdy all. On again off again cyclist as work (US Army) and travel (see previous) have allowed. 55 years old, typical old Army guy with usual signs of high mileage on knees, neck, etc. Last few years since a rough deployment to Afghanistan and some pretty serious health issues have kept me off bike for about 7 years. Just had major surgery to abdomen to correct some of those issues and still recovering from that. Also ended up with a (hopefully) temporary colostomy which is taking some getting used to.

Anyway have two true and faithful bicycles in the stable.
A cool steel Surly Pacer frame that I built up with nice parts and wide-ish tires that I will keep at work to get in some riding 2 or three days a week on the rough asphalt/gravel round around our facility. Might also commute when I get my endurance back as it is less than ten miles each way.
Next is a Specialized Roubaix that I got before everything turned in disc brakes, etc. Really nice bike that I will ride in morning and on weekends when I can.

Since I am still gimpy and lacking strength form being in hospital for about 6 weeks I am just now getting on the bike gingerly. I notice that my flexibility is seriously reduced from the hospital stay, as well as endurance.

Glad to be heading back into the swing of things. Going to be slow but will get there.
All the best, and thanks for the great forum.

Tim Beghtol

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Old 07-13-18, 10:03 PM
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One thing I found really helpful when recovering from surgery (a lot less dramatic than yours) was to have an indoor trainer I could stick the bike on. This allowed me to regain confidence and range of motion under very controlled circumstances, and it made the transition back to roads a lot easier. Best of luck with your recovery, and I hope you are home for good now. Congratulations on surviving that!

I'm still really young. Turned 55 this year. (Why me?) Still, far better than the alternative.
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Old 07-13-18, 10:07 PM
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Had not thought about a trainer. That makes a lot of sense, as I will be sorting out position and fit some to accommodate the "more seasoned" me...

Thanks!
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Old 07-13-18, 10:09 PM
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I have a bike I bought at age 24, and it eventually became unridable until I changed the stem, the bars, the gearing ...

You are on the right track with the Pacer it sounds like.
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Old 07-14-18, 04:53 AM
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I know the feeling of waking up old Tim. Best of luck on the recovery and I do hope it is temporary. An old desert m/c riding friend has one full time, so I know the details.

I'm 71 and recovered from a bad bicycle shunt last year. Fractures in the left scapula, two left ribs, bruised lt. lung. It took 90 days before I was able to power-walk three miles and do stairs w/o using the handrail.

A book to consider reading after reading some reviews, 'Younger Next Year.'

John
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Old 07-14-18, 06:11 AM
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Tim, on the days I wake up feeling old (now 61...served +29yrs in Navy...retired at 55 with some health challenges)...it is usually due to what I did yesterday (or, as you know, years ago). I find it frustrating, but I just take it slow that day...recovery time is important. Listen to your body. I had major surgery 15 years ago and the memory of the recovery is that I really had to pace myself closely because my brain kept telling me I should hit it hard (still active duty at that point). You've earned the time to take care of yourself and ensure you heal properly. You'll get there. I'm lifting you up in prayer today. Keep smiling.
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Old 07-14-18, 07:25 AM
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I wake up every day and I am old. I have no alternative and it beats not waking up.

Luckily I don't wake up every day feeling old.
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Old 07-14-18, 10:56 AM
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You are battered and bruised and parts worn down, but you are not old, not really. There are three phases of old - 1) young old 2) middle old 3) frail old. Frail old is what most of us dread. At seventy, fifty five seems like a babe in the woods, and I'm sure the eight five year olds are laughing at me. You are young old.
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Old 07-14-18, 06:00 PM
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18 years ago this past Tuesday I woke up, went into the bathroom, looked in the mirror and said to that half century old guy looking back, You have most likely lived longer than you have left to live. You will most likely be diagnosed with cancer some time before you die. Suck it up since you are now old and get on with getting on as long as you can!!!

Still alive and just had another cancer treatment so I'm batting .500 right now. And as for the following bolded words......

Originally Posted by Gerryattrick View Post
I wake up every day and I am old. I have no alternative and it beats not waking up.

Luckily I don't wake up every day feeling old.
..... there are times I wish I hadn't opened my eyes to life and honestly it wouldn't bother me if that happened.
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Old 07-14-18, 06:07 PM
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Thank you all for the encouragement and perspectives.

I by no means intended any of my comments to sound like complaints.

Been many a day in places far away that seeing another sunrise seemed unlikely.
Current medical stuff was pretty serious but came out of it on my feet.

I am ok with where I am.

Just didn't think it fair for it to sneak up on me like it did!
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Old 07-14-18, 06:26 PM
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Country song-"I'm doing all right for the shape I'm in" holds a lot of truth for us older guys. Keep hanging in there Tim. If life were all down hill you know where we'd all be?
Ex Army and still wearing my jump boots. (I need the ankle support to hold me up) haha
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Old 07-14-18, 07:39 PM
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I had an ileostomy following a bout of colon cancer 14 years ago. One of the worst experiences of my life. After it was reversed, I started cycling, which my well have saved my life when the cancer can back. Good luck to you, T. I really hope all works out well for you.
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Old 07-14-18, 08:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Gerryattrick View Post
I wake up every day and I am old. I have no alternative and it beats not waking up.

Luckily I don't wake up every day feeling old.
There ya go.

The "waking up old" thing resonates with me. It seems like all of a sudden, you look around and realize you're the oldest blighter in the group. When did that happen?

As long as I feel good and everything works, I'm OK with it.
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Old 07-15-18, 01:09 AM
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Ditto, an indoor trainer. Cycleops are a good start and may be good enough for many of us for years. A friend gave me his old Cycleops trainer after I was hit by a car a couple of months ago. About 3 weeks ago I was ready to try it. Works great with my old steel frame road bike while I'm watching TV.

The trainer kept me in good enough shape to ride my same 15 mph average speed on a favorite nearby 20 mile route. Granted, road riding is a bit rougher on the injured shoulder, especially on chipseal. And I missed my heat adaptation window this spring/early summer, so I feel the heat more than previous summers. But my legs and aerobic fitness are still pretty good, about 85% of my pre-injury condition.

And I'm a bit more methodical with the indoor trainer. I'll devote one 40 minute session a week to hard interval training -- lots of sprints at maximum effort for 15-30 seconds, followed by recovery pedaling, repeated for up to 30 minutes after warmup; another 40 minute to riding out of the saddle, 60 seconds standing and pedaling, 2 minutes sitting pedaling -- still in a hard gear, and repeat as often as I can; and a couple of easier sessions of an hour or longer at a moderate or easy effort. (The 40 minute sessions correspond with watching episodes of a favorite TV series.)

I'm hoping to be able to maintain this workout schedule through my next medical annoyance -- having my swollen thyroid rechecked this month for the big C. ENT doc last week didn't like the look of it so I'm having another ultrasound and biopsy.
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Old 07-15-18, 06:37 AM
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I've found that the flexibility does mostly come back but it takes longer these days. My understanding is that the anesthesia can wreak havoc on the entire mind and body--more so the older we get. Nice couple of bikes. After some open heart surgeries in my early fifties, I thought that I might never be able to assume my regular road position and while straining to see up the road, I contemplated an upright position with new bars and stem. My flexibility mostly came back so don't change anything yet.
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Old 07-15-18, 06:57 AM
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You are only as old as you will let yourself be, barring physical problems. If you set you rust.
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Old 07-15-18, 07:51 AM
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Hang in there Tim, I'll echo Kurt in that I had a colostomy after chemo rotted holes in my intestine. My lymphoma nearly killed me five times and I was in a wheel chair for 6 months last year. I took up cycling to rebuild strength this Spring and rode with the colostomy until a month ago, when it was reversed. Still getting stronger everyday. I rode 30 miles yesterday.

Check out "Stealth Belt". They make a Velcro wrap that keeps the bag in place and allows all manner of physical activity. Best of luck in your recovery.

Steve
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Old 07-15-18, 11:27 AM
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But I keep waking up.. that's the basic good thing.
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Old 07-15-18, 01:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Biker395 View Post
There ya go.

The "waking up old" thing resonates with me. It seems like all of a sudden, you look around and realize you're the oldest blighter in the group. When did that happen?

As long as I feel good and everything works, I'm OK with it.
You just finished the RAAM. Are you sure there's not a portrait of a very old cyclist in your attic?
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Old 07-15-18, 08:04 PM
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78 years old - supposed to be dying soon, but I think I have fooled them. Instead I am getting more endurance, swimming, walking, bicycling, a LOT of stretching, and many resistance exercises including TRX. And I wake up feeling good.
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Old 07-16-18, 10:06 AM
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Jim from Boston
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I woke up one day and I was OLD !!!
Originally Posted by TBeghtol View Post
Howdy all. On again off again cyclist as work… Just had major surgery to abdomen to correct some of those issues and still recovering from that. Also ended up with a (hopefully) temporary colostomy which is taking some getting used to.

Anyway have two true and faithful bicycles in the stable.…Next is a Specialized Roubaix that I got before everything turned in disc brakes, etc. Really nice bike that I will ride in morning and on weekends when I can.

Since I am still gimpy and lacking strength form being in hospital for about 6 weeks I am just now getting on the bike gingerly. I notice that my flexibility is seriously reduced from the hospital stay, as well as endurance.

Glad to be heading back into the swing of things. Going to be slow but will get there.
All the best, and thanks for the great forum.

Tim Beghtol
Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
One thing I found really helpful when recovering from surgery (a lot less dramatic than yours) was to have an indoor trainer I could stick the bike on. This allowed me to regain confidence and range of motion under very controlled circumstances, and it made the transition back to roads a lot easier.

Best of luck with your recovery, and I hope you are home for good now. Congratulations on surviving that!

I'm still really young. Turned 55 this year. (Why me?) Still, far better than the alternative.
Originally Posted by pursuance View Post
I know the feeling of waking up old Tim. Best of luck on the recovery and I do hope it is temporary. An old desert m/c riding friend has one full time, so I know the details.

I'm 71 and recovered from a bad bicycle shunt last year. Fractures in the left scapula, two left ribs, bruised lt. lung. It took 90 days before I was able to power-walk three miles and do stairs w/o using the handrail.

A book to consider reading after reading some reviews, 'Younger Next Year.'

John
Originally Posted by OldTryGuy View Post
18 years ago this past Tuesday I woke up, went into the bathroom, looked in the mirror and said to that half century old guy looking back,

You have most likely lived longer than you have left to live. You will most likely be diagnosed with cancer some time before you die. Suck it up since you are now old and get on with getting on as long as you can!!!

Still alive and just had another cancer treatment so I'm batting .500 right now. And as for the following bolded words......

..... there are times I wish I hadn't opened my eyes to life and honestly it wouldn't bother me if that happened.
Originally Posted by Gerryattrick View Post
I wake up every day and I am old. I have no alternative and it beats not waking up.

Luckily I don't wake up every day feeling old.
Dittoes to all the well-wishes above, and condolences to those with health problems. I had my epiphany with getting old at age 62 after a serious bike accident that put me in an acute care hospital for two weeks, rehab hospital for four weeks, off work for three months, and off the bike for five months (but I did buy a Specialized S-works (Roubaix) after my Bridgestone RB-1 was totaled).

I have previously posted about retirement and old age, FWIW:
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Retirement!
I’m a few years away from retirement, but it is starting to loom large. Nice set of tips, @jppe, and my comiseration to those with health problems (IMO cycling can be an effective preventive maintainence). I too like my rewarding job, psychically and financially, and I want to establish an inheiritance for the children…

My cycling lifestyle is important to me and retirement vis--vis cycling poses a dilemma.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I previously replied to this thread on the Commuting Forum, "How to motivate myself to ride when I'll no longer be commuting to work?"...

Just yesterday a colleague asked me when I was going to retire. I suggested a number of years, adding, "I like my job, and it’s a convenient place (and distance) to bike to."
And,
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
…Since you brought up mortality…On a few threads on BF, I posted about how I live my ante-mortem life:
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Ever contemplate your mortality on the road?

Actually, in one of my most serious contemplations of mortality, the Road served as a relief:
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
My magic moment when I realized what makes cycling fun (important) to me was at a lunch with two doctors about 20 years ago. We got to talking about the vicissitudes of life, like sudden death, or trivial symptoms as harbingers of a serious disease. We eventually came around to that old chestnut to live life to the fullest everyday.

As we were leaving, the surgeon, a marathon runner, said, “Well, any day with a run in it is a good day for me.” I was already an avid cyclist and cycle commuter, and that clicked with me, any day with a ride in it is a good day for me.

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Old 07-18-18, 03:12 AM
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At fifty-five, you are not old. You are recovering from some serious surgery and healing. The body can heal, and in ten years you might wake up feeling young.
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Old 07-18-18, 07:28 AM
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I'm not old! But that guy in the mirror is!
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Old 07-18-18, 11:35 AM
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can't keep a good man down! looking forward, onward & upward! that's the spirit! & thank you for your service!
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Old 07-18-18, 02:29 PM
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Old? No way. After a few enlistments ( running from '69 thru 2006- with several gaps) and "old" jokes from the family I decided to agree with my then 97 year old grandmother. "old is ten years older than what you see in the mirror."
Works for me.
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