Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fifty Plus (50+)
Reload this Page >

Tubeless Conversion Questions

Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

Tubeless Conversion Questions

Old 11-13-18, 09:58 AM
  #1  
LesG
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: N. Kentucky
Posts: 68
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Tubeless Conversion Questions

I have a 2018 Trek DS3 with tubeless ready rims (700). Probably around late Spring or early Summer I'll be needing new tires and to that end I'm starting now to figure out what I want to replace them with. Going tubeless is being considered. So a couple of questions please.

1/ I haven't actually looked inside the rims so I don't know if they're already taped but does tubeless ready mean the rims are already taped and ready to accept a tubeless tire or do they need to be taped?

2/ If the tires aren't already taped there seems to be two ways to go. One is, well, tubeless tape. The other is an offering from Bontrager which I hesitate to call tape because it looks (from online pictures) sort of like a pre made and fitted big rubber gasket that fits down in the rim. I'm not sure if one ( tape or the"gasket") is better than the other or if it's a wash between them. Just looking at the Bontrager "gasket" thing, my one potential concern is it staying in place when I go to put the tire on. My one concern using regular tape is getting it off in the future. Any input about either way (tape or the gasket looking piece) would be appreciated.

3/ The presta tubeless valves that I looked at have two different types of gaskets to seal at the rim. One type is a sort of cone (perhaps funnel) shape and the other is flat. The funnel shaped one seems like the way to go but I'm not sure. Again any input would be appreciated .
Also any recommendations for a particular brand of valve.

4/ Finally any additional thoughts about things I haven't considered... I know this is the grumpy old man section of the forum so please keep #4 on the positive side
LesG is offline  
Old 11-13-18, 01:26 PM
  #2  
Igotdibs
Senior Citizen
 
Igotdibs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: North Bend, WA
Posts: 74

Bikes: Trek Emonda SLR7 Disc, Trek Madone 5.9, 1980 Colnago Super, Trek 4100 mtb

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
I'm no expert, but I would recommend all parts be from one system. If your rims are Bontrager, go with their tubeless rim strips, valves and TLR tires.
Igotdibs is offline  
Old 11-13-18, 08:35 PM
  #3  
Planemaker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Wichita, KS.
Posts: 823
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 147 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 2 Posts
1. Guessing there is a rim strip in the rims now (you will need to either tape or use the Bontrager rim strip)
2. I prefer to stay away from proprietary stuff so, I would recommend tape (two tight wraps in the center will work fine)
3. Stans valves work great
4. I would consider a Panaracer Gravel King SK or Schwalbe G1 tire (Schwalbe will be easier to mount)
5. Don't forget sealant (I use Orange Seal but, Stans is good too)
Planemaker is offline  
Old 11-13-18, 11:07 PM
  #4  
LesG
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: N. Kentucky
Posts: 68
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Sometimes OEM is the way to go but I'm still debating between tape or the Bontrager strips. Everywhere I've researched says the Stan's valves are just fine so thanks for reinforcing that. Planemaker, glad you mentioned the Schwalbe G1 tires because right now the G1 Allround are the ones I already put at the top of the list but will definitely look at the Panaracer ones. Stan's has two sealants out, one regular and the other Race. Orange Seal has a couple of formulas out too, regular and endurance. With both brands the "regular" formulas seem (from what I've read) to have a longer life in the tire before it dries and you need to add more compared to their "high performance" offerings which dry out faster... several months compared to several weeks. For the type of riding I do, I don't think I need the race/endurance formulas. Depending on which "expert" review I've read, one of those brands would beat out the other and vice versa.

Thanks for the replies. Any input helps because I never had tubeless on a bike before so I know almost nothing about it. I've got a few months before buying anything... mostly getting research out of the way now so when the time comes ALL of the research is behind me and then just go out buy whatever I decide upon and not have to make spur of the moment decisions.
LesG is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 12:03 AM
  #5  
BluesDawg
just keep riding
 
BluesDawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Milledgeville, Georgia
Posts: 13,537

Bikes: 2018 Black Mountain Cycles MCD,2017 Advocate Cycles Seldom Seen Drop Bar, 2017 Niner Jet 9 Alloy, 2015 Zukas custom road, 2003 KHS Milano Tandem, 1986 Nishiki Cadence rigid MTB, 1980ish Fuji S-12S

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 161 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
1) Some tubeless ready rims come with tubeless rim tape installed, but most do not.

2) I've had good results with Stan's tape and with Specialized tubeless rim strips similar to what you are calling a gasket. After struggling to get the premade strip onto the rim, your concern about it moving will probably go away . With either, make sure you get the right width for your rims. It should 2-3mm wider than the internal with of your rims. Removing tape is no problem.

3) I have had good results with Stan's, WTB, Velocity and Specialized tubeless valves. On rare occasions the shape of a rim will work better with one brand better than others, so Bontrager may be your safest bet, but Stan's would probably work perfectly.

4) Stan's sealant works well. I slightly prefer Orange Seal Endurance because it is easier to remove the old, dried up sealant from tires than the booger prone Stan's. Contrary to what you stated above, Orange Seal Endurance lasts longer than their standard formula.
BluesDawg is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 12:48 AM
  #6  
DrIsotope 
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 6,402

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn

Mentioned: 89 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3414 Post(s)
Liked 48 Times in 36 Posts
Have had the best luck with the normal, yellow Stan's Tape-- not the "race" stuff. Too many wheels taped to count.

The VeloTubes valves on Amazon are my far and away favorites. Consistent ID for the whole stem (most others have the rubber swaged onto the bottom, so the hole is smaller,) removable core, 3 different lengths, 6 different colors, $12-15 a pair. They're in all of my wheels.
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 08:30 AM
  #7  
LesG
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: N. Kentucky
Posts: 68
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I stand corrected on the Orange Seal Endurance being faster to dry up in the wheel. The VeloTubes valves, I noticed have an O ring for the outside. Seems those would serve two purposes. As a sort of backup seal to the main one inside the rim and also help somewhat hold the nut in place, something akin to a lock washer. Those might rot over time but I'd probably need new tires by then. That and it's my habit to put a thin layer of silicone plumber's grease on O rings (not only on bikes) just to protect them from rot and to minimize rubbing / or tares when the nut is tightened down, hand tight or not.
LesG is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 02:57 PM
  #8  
Planemaker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Wichita, KS.
Posts: 823
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 147 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 2 Posts
Orange Seal Endurance lasts longer but, the regular blend seals larger punctures.

It's easy to check and top off sealant occasionally.
Planemaker is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 06:21 PM
  #9  
LesG
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: N. Kentucky
Posts: 68
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I've now pretty much decided that rim tape is the way to go and not rim strips (either would be fine though). So, allow me one more question ... OK, allow me probably one more question. How wide of rim tape do you guys use? Enough to cover just past the spoke holes or all the way up the sides of the rim but just short of where the tire bead seals? Reason I ask is Trek (Bontrager) has several offerings for their rim strips. I narrowed it down to one but that came in two widths, 17 and 22 mm and couldn't figure out which one I needed. So I did an online chat with Trek and after they checked their manuals was told to use the 17 mm width strip for the DS3. Using their rim strip that width looks like it would come up just short of where the tire's bead seals / seats to the rim. Based upon Treks 17mm answer for strips, I'm thinking something in the 12 mm width range for tape would be about right. Enough to cover past both sides of the spoke holes but very little going up the sides of the rim. Also I figure if the tape goes near the top of the rim the more likely I am to booger up the tape when installing the tire. That's my thinking (hypothesis, best guess!).
LesG is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 07:52 PM
  #10  
Planemaker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Wichita, KS.
Posts: 823
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 147 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by LesG View Post
I've now pretty much decided that rim tape is the way to go and not rim strips (either would be fine though). So, allow me one more question ... OK, allow me probably one more question. How wide of rim tape do you guys use? Enough to cover just past the spoke holes or all the way up the sides of the rim but just short of where the tire bead seals? Reason I ask is Trek (Bontrager) has several offerings for their rim strips. I narrowed it down to one but that came in two widths, 17 and 22 mm and couldn't figure out which one I needed. So I did an online chat with Trek and after they checked their manuals was told to use the 17 mm width strip for the DS3. Using their rim strip that width looks like it would come up just short of where the tire's bead seals / seats to the rim. Based upon Treks 17mm answer for strips, I'm thinking something in the 12 mm width range for tape would be about right. Enough to cover past both sides of the spoke holes but very little going up the sides of the rim. Also I figure if the tape goes near the top of the rim the more likely I am to booger up the tape when installing the tire. That's my thinking (hypothesis, best guess!).
I prefer a wider tape but not so much that it interferes the bead seating. Make sure you get the tape on as tight and evenly as possible with two wraps (the tire bead rides in the center of the rim while mounting the tire on the rim and you need as much room as possible in the center of the rim to hold the bead).
Planemaker is offline  
Old 11-15-18, 12:20 AM
  #11  
bogydave
Senior Member
 
bogydave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: ALASKA , SoCal
Posts: 888

Bikes: /Skye/ Torker mt, Sirrus flat bar

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 182 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
How is a tubeless ready wheel different from
a regular wheel..?

One assumption I made is they were airtight ,
but some are saying they will need tubeless tape applied
to be used tubeless.
bogydave is offline  
Old 11-15-18, 08:07 AM
  #12  
DrIsotope 
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 6,402

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn

Mentioned: 89 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3414 Post(s)
Liked 48 Times in 36 Posts
It's mostly about the bead hook, though there are hookless carbon tubeless wheels. I pretend that those do not exist. Only UST compliant wheels are airtight, not requiring tape-- Mavic, a selection of Shimano wheels, Crank Brothers, others. While having to tape a wheel isn't a dealbreaker, setting up tubeless on a UST wheel is a whole lot easier. Tires seat and seal on my Crank Brothers more easily than on any other wheels I've ever used.

This diagram from WTB shows it pretty well, but (I think for safety) leaves out "ghetto tubeless," where people run tubeless on completely non-tubeless ready wheels, tires, or both:

__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Old 11-15-18, 08:10 AM
  #13  
Mark Manner
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Nashville, TN
Posts: 184
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bogydave View Post
How is a tubeless ready wheel different from
a regular wheel..?

One assumption I made is they were airtight ,
but some are saying they will need tubeless tape applied
to be used tubeless.
Some may be airtight, which I think just means no spoke holes visible, but the ones I have are not and require tape. The tubeless rims I have also don't have the hook that the bead on normal tubed clincher tires catches on, which means you have to use tubeless tires (even if you want to use an inner tube with them). I know some tubelss ready tires do have a hook since they can be used with regular clinchers or tubeless tires.
Mark [EDIT, see above post which crossed with mine, much more complete info, as expected]
Mark Manner is offline  
Old 11-15-18, 03:04 PM
  #14  
msbiker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 54
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have used tubeless on two bikes for about 3 years. I had a difficult time at first and the lbs recommended 1 inch gorilla tape. It worked great for me and bit cheaper than the alternatives. I use orange seal endurance sealant and like it. An air compressor is very helpful for popping the tire on the bead. Finally, stan's has a small metal core remover tool that will work on either presta or Schrader cores. You can use needle nose pliers or the small rubber tool that comes with some valves to remove the core, but the stan's tool makes life easier. I also keep some extra cores.
msbiker is offline  
Old 11-15-18, 09:09 PM
  #15  
LesG
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: N. Kentucky
Posts: 68
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Re getting the tire bead to pop into place when filling the first time. There's an old trick car guys would use. They'd tie a rope snuggly around the center of a tire and then, using a screwdriver inserted in the loop, twist the rope as tight as possible. As the center of the tire was forced inward by the tightening rope, that would help push the sides of the tire outward and it would usually pop into place as soon as air was added. I've used that trick on riding lawn mower wheels but I've never tried that on a much thinner bike tire. I think it would be doable as a last resort and I'm keeping the trick in mind should I need it.
LesG is offline  
Old 11-15-18, 09:09 PM
  #16  
MAK
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Delaware
Posts: 1,337

Bikes: Yes, I have bikes.

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 126 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/

Take a look at this article. It answers some of your questions. There are more related article on the Park Tools site.

Good luck.
MAK is offline  
Old 11-18-18, 09:08 PM
  #17  
LesG
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: N. Kentucky
Posts: 68
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanks for the link to Park Tool. I view some of their help videos from time to time and as needed and find them pretty helpful.

One of their videos I saw recently was showing them putting tubeless tape on a rim. It was Gorilla tape (I'm pretty sure it was) that they were using and then later in the video they switched what was showing on the rim to "real" tape. Anyway, I read about folks using Gorilla tape but I don't think I'm going that route but found it interesting they were using it for a video... well at least part of the video.
LesG is offline  
Old 11-19-18, 06:36 AM
  #18  
masi61
Senior Member
 
masi61's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 1,962

Bikes: Puch Marco Polo, Saint Tropez, Masi Gran Criterium

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 349 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
It's mostly about the bead hook, though there are hookless carbon tubeless wheels. I pretend that those do not exist. Only UST compliant wheels are airtight, not requiring tape-- Mavic, a selection of Shimano wheels, Crank Brothers, others. While having to tape a wheel isn't a dealbreaker, setting up tubeless on a UST wheel is a whole lot easier. Tires seat and seal on my Crank Brothers more easily than on any other wheels I've ever used.

This diagram from WTB shows it pretty well, but (I think for safety) leaves out "ghetto tubeless," where people run tubeless on completely non-tubeless ready wheels, tires, or both:

That is a helpful chart. Clearly the most confidence inspiring combination would be the bottom right one. I’m hoping that my A23 “tubeless ready” rims will be all right with “standardized tubeless” tires. Now that I am realizing that Shimano and Fulcrum have this nice, square standardized channel to create a leak free seal with tubeless, I’m starting to “get it”. I’m eager to try road tubeless and feel that the ride could be tuned for worse roads by using lower pressures and the potential for better grip and ride quality is intrigui g.
masi61 is offline  
Old 11-22-18, 05:51 PM
  #19  
BluesDawg
just keep riding
 
BluesDawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Milledgeville, Georgia
Posts: 13,537

Bikes: 2018 Black Mountain Cycles MCD,2017 Advocate Cycles Seldom Seen Drop Bar, 2017 Niner Jet 9 Alloy, 2015 Zukas custom road, 2003 KHS Milano Tandem, 1986 Nishiki Cadence rigid MTB, 1980ish Fuji S-12S

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 161 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by LesG View Post
I've now pretty much decided that rim tape is the way to go and not rim strips (either would be fine though). So, allow me one more question ... OK, allow me probably one more question. How wide of rim tape do you guys use? Enough to cover just past the spoke holes or all the way up the sides of the rim but just short of where the tire bead seals? Reason I ask is Trek (Bontrager) has several offerings for their rim strips. I narrowed it down to one but that came in two widths, 17 and 22 mm and couldn't figure out which one I needed. So I did an online chat with Trek and after they checked their manuals was told to use the 17 mm width strip for the DS3. Using their rim strip that width looks like it would come up just short of where the tire's bead seals / seats to the rim. Based upon Treks 17mm answer for strips, I'm thinking something in the 12 mm width range for tape would be about right. Enough to cover past both sides of the spoke holes but very little going up the sides of the rim. Also I figure if the tape goes near the top of the rim the more likely I am to booger up the tape when installing the tire. That's my thinking (hypothesis, best guess!).
Tubeless rim strips and tubeless rim tape do the same job. Why would you want to use narrower tape than the recommended width for a strip? (or was the 12 a typo and you meant to say 17mm?) Most rim manufacturers suggest using tubeless tape that is 2-3 mm wider than the internal width of the rim so it covers the full area under the tire. For example, the Velocity A23 rim has an internal width of 18mm and they recommend their 21mm wide tape for tubeless setups.
BluesDawg is offline  
Old 11-22-18, 08:46 PM
  #20  
LesG
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: N. Kentucky
Posts: 68
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I did mean 12 mm tape but that was more of me "thinking out loud" than anything. My thinking was, why tape rim edge to rim edge when really all you need is to cover up the spoke holes which I still think is true. Unless I'm missing something the bead on the tubeless tire is going to seal in the rim so tape isn't needed all the way across the rim... and that tire to rim seal is further enhanced with sealant. I've since re thunk using narrower tape that goes just past the spoke holes. I haven't actually measured the inside of my rims (too lazy to take the tire off) but the outside rim to rim measures 25 mm. I figure the inside is probably around 23 mm. I'm guessing something like 25 or 26 mm tape would work if I go rim to rim. I'm going to go with wider tape than 12mm but not 25 or 26 mm but probably 21 mm tape for two reasons. There's a bigger chance I may booger up the tape simply mounting the tire if that tape is rim to rim. Especially so if the tape goes a bit up on the rim, I might actually peel the tape back a bit simply putting the tire on. The second thing is taking the tire off I would run into the same problem and probably more so due to tire, rim tape and sealant being all together and having been together for sometime (hopefully sometime) after installation... my experience has been that things tend to stick together more over time. With 21 mm tape I've got a little wiggle room installing the tire but plenty of overlap past the spoke holes to get a good seal.
LesG is offline  
Old 12-08-18, 06:16 PM
  #21  
LesG
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: N. Kentucky
Posts: 68
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I'll be buying those new tubeless tires right after Christmas. I've got it boiled down to 2 choices, both Schwalbe. One the G-One Allround and the other the Almotion. I'm leaning toward the Almotion as it seems to be a better fit for the type of surfaces I ride on which is mostly pavement but throw in some packed gravel and then a very occasional dirt (smooth) path. The one thing I hate about the Almotion has nothing to do with performance but everything to do with aesthetics and it's that reflective strip... yeah, yeah, I know aesthetics probably shouldn't factor!. Both the G-One and Almotion have pretty good rolling resistance (for what they are) and being tubeless should have pretty good puncture resistance with sealant added. The Almotion should have better longevity. Bottom line to all this, today I'm leaning toward the Almotion but ask me tomorrow and it's just as likely I'd say the G-One.

Here's one problem I'm having trouble finding any info about, re the Almotion. The best I can tell Schwalbe recently discontinued the Tubeless Easy Microskin tubeless version (in 700 x 38) although they are still the most common found on sellers websites. Schwalbe has updated it to the V-Guard tubeless version and this is now their only Almotion offering in 700 x 38. The TLE Microskin (700 x 38) no longer shows on the Schwalbe website. I've only found the "new" V-Guard version for sale on one website. The new version is (depending on where I look for info) is around 200 to 350 grams lighter compared to the TLE version. I know V-Guard is a light weight puncture resistant layer compared to TLE and probably where the weight savings come from. OTH, Schwable shows the TLE version to have slightly better puncture resistance: https://www.schwalbetires.com/BENCHM...URE-PROTECTION

Any additional info or comments about all of this would be appreciated.
LesG is offline  
Old 12-08-18, 09:47 PM
  #22  
tcs
Palmer
 
tcs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Parts Unknown
Posts: 5,803

Bikes: 1980 Mike Melton, 1982 Stumpjumper, 1982 Santana, 1984 Alex Moulton AM, 2008 BikeFriday tikit T-11, 2010 Dawes Briercliffe, 2017 Dahon Curl i5, 2019 Surly ˝DT14

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 492 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 13 Posts
One guy's advice: The Trouble with Road Tubeless.
tcs is offline  
Old 12-08-18, 10:10 PM
  #23  
DrIsotope 
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 6,402

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn

Mentioned: 89 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3414 Post(s)
Liked 48 Times in 36 Posts
Every time someone posts that banal "article" by Heine, I throw up in my mouth a little. "Oh, I inflated a 700x35 tubeless to 108psi and it blew off the rim." You don't say!! Imagine my shock!! I'm a fair bit north of 200lbs and I run my 700x35s @ 70psi.

I have around 30,000 miles on tubeless, including ~7,500 on 700x25s-- at 90-95psi. His article is 18 months old, and already woefully outdated. "Based on all of the above, we – as well as other tire makers like Pirelli – have concluded that at this time, running high-pressure tires tubeless isn’t worth the risks." Well, Pirelli now has the Cinturato VeloTLR in sizes from 700x26 to 700x35.

So... yawn.
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Old 12-09-18, 08:41 AM
  #24  
Trsnrtr
Super Moderator
 
Trsnrtr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Central Illinois
Posts: 16,610

Bikes: Giant Propel, Gianni Motta, Co-Motion Supremo, ICE VTX

Mentioned: 91 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6120 Post(s)
Liked 26 Times in 19 Posts
Since I just did this a couple weeks ago, I'll post. I have tubeless ready Giant rims and had installed tubeless Schwalbe Ones a couple years ago with success but a huge sidewall gash ruined a tire after a few hundred miles, I said screw it and went back to tubes and tires.

This time, I just happened to see Giant AC 0 tubeless tires at my LBS and I needed tires so I decided to give it a go. I taped the rims with one wrap of Stan's tape. I needed new valves so I ordered Silca valves and they worked slick and sealed like a dream. They've got a cute little rubber seal on the spoke side of the wheel. Worked great. I used 2 oz. of Orange seal but ran out and had to use Stan's for the other wheel.

The Giant tires mounted easily to the Giant rims and I guess that's a plus for using matching components. Aired them up with an air compressor and they "snapped" and sealed perfectly.

I only have 120 miles so far but already have had a small seal up. Our roads are treated with a salt/sand mixture in the winter and small punters are common. I found an orange smudge on one of the tires about the third ride out and pealed it off to find a nice orange dot in the tread. This is exactly why I decided to run tubeless this winter.

Success, so far.
__________________
Dennis T

Trsnrtr is offline  
Old 05-13-19, 06:57 AM
  #25  
LesG
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: N. Kentucky
Posts: 68
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I was the OP for this thread and I'm re-opening it for an update on my tubeless experience/experiment. It isn't good.

First my tire selection. I really wanted to like one of the Schwalbe G-One offerings but the short tread life reports put me off. Really most of my riding is pavement (MUPS, rail trails and streets) with some ventures on packed gravel or smooth dirt so I mostly don't need an off pavement tire. Based on that a touring type tire seemed the way to go. Bottom line I went with Schwalbe Almotions, 700 x 38. Pretty good rolling resistance (in the lab anyway) and on par with some skinnier road tires. Reported tread life is pretty good. There is an older tubeless version (microskin) that can still be found and a newer version with V-Guard. I don't count ounces but for those of you who do a pair of the V-Guards is about 8 oz less weight than the older version. Hokiefyd, if you're reading this, from another post in the past you mentioned you didn't like the reflective strip on the Schwalbe touring tires and I agree. Aesthetics shouldn't really bother me but fact is I want my bike to look good and that reflective strip is something I don't like... and for me not needed as I never ride at night. So the Almotions arrived and I simply removed the reflective strip... taking it slow, it peels off like the tape that it is. Bottom line, I don't have many miles on the tire but so far I'm happy with the tires. They roll nice and give a comfortable ride. I'm 5' 11", weight is 190 lbs. I keep the front tire at 60 psi and the rear 65... the range shown on the almotions is 50 to 80 psi.

As for going tubeless, things didn't go well. I ended up going with the Bontrager tubeless rim strips and not tape. They (Bontrager) have several offerings for their various tubeless ready rims so to be sure I ordered the correct ones I did an online chat with Trek to be sure I was getting the correct strip for my 2019 DS3. I decided for now I'd mount one tire with a tube and the other one tubeless to see how things go. If everything went well, I'd go tubeless with the other tire later on. The tubeless strips arrive and, after removing the original protective rim strip I installed the tubeless one. It fit the rim like it was it was made for it which of course it was! Mounted the tire and although a bit tight and with some extra patience I was able to do so without using a tire lever. I was successful in airing up the tire with a hand pump (my compressor not needed) and heard a couple of pops that told me the bead had seated. So far so good. About 4 hours later the tire was almost flat. That, of course, I expected because I hadn't added any sealant. Added 3 oz of Orange Seal. Spun the tire around, turned it sideways on both sides and spun it to distribute the sealant. Even took it for a short ride very close to home ride. 48 hours later the tire was flat. Reinflated and my hope was the sealant simply needed to cure a bit. Nope, 48 to 72 hours or so later it was flat again. I couldn't find any obvious leaks with the tire submerged in water (well part of the tire little at a time). I finally gave up on tubeless and put in a tube.
LesG is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.