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Clipping Clip Clipped

Old 03-27-19, 03:32 PM
  #26  
canklecat
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Originally Posted by pbass View Post
Maybe because I come from a MTB background, but I just can't see how people's feet are getting bounced off the pedals with flats. If you're on rough terrain, or heck, going over pretty much any kind of bump, you should be out of the saddle with your weight on your feet. That's why with flats with pins and shoes like 5.10s, your feet are gonna stay put (if you're riding..."properly").
And besides getting bounced around, you're gonna end up with lower back pain after a while too, sitting down through the rough stuff!
Yeah, I'm wearing casual shoes and using urban style platform pedals, not mountain biking footwear and pedals. Big difference in grip. The Stolen Bike Brand Thermalite pedals are reasonably grippy with built in plastic pins, but grip depends on my shoes. The only time I notice any problems is when group rides veer off the city pavement onto gravel or rough roads.

If I ever do get a proper off-pavement bike I'll get proper pedals and shoes. I have my eye on a 1990s Kona Lava Dome just for that purpose. Nothing tricky or techy, just gravel and occasional entry level singletrack locally.
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Old 03-27-19, 03:37 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by rnothog View Post
Like the Roam 1 a lot...next bike might be a high-end flat bar road bike or a Giant Defy Advanced 2...if there are opinions on any of these topics, like to hear them.
Really, really need to not fall on bionic hips. Hmm. As we've discussed here before, you can dump one of these rigs, but you have to be trying pretty hard:


Note: you will want to use foot retention on a recumbent trike because if your foot slips off the pedal you can run over yourself. (Sounds way funnier than it is in real life.) The salient point, however, is that unclip or fall is not an issue.

Last edited by tcs; 03-27-19 at 06:38 PM.
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Old 03-27-19, 03:45 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
Yeah, I'm wearing casual shoes and using urban style platform pedals, not mountain biking footwear and pedals. Big difference in grip. The Stolen Bike Brand Thermalite pedals are reasonably grippy with built in plastic pins, but grip depends on my shoes. The only time I notice any problems is when group rides veer off the city pavement onto gravel or rough roads.

If I ever do get a proper off-pavement bike I'll get proper pedals and shoes. I have my eye on a 1990s Kona Lava Dome just for that purpose. Nothing tricky or techy, just gravel and occasional entry level singletrack locally.
Yes, the MTB shoes and pedals do make a difference but as I say, if you're off your butt with your weight on your feet, it's gotta be pretty darn bumpy to get your feet bounced off the pedals--your feet are pushing down into the pedals, and the bike/pedals are pushing up into your feet as you go over bumps. Look at BMX'ers just wearing Vans and cheapo plastic pedals or whatever. Unless if you're wearing shoes that are decidedly "slippy", or, shoes with too much tread/lugs, like some running shoes, which can mean not enough contact between the sole and the pedal surface. FWIW, I have these on my urban/around town bike--not as aggressive as some MTB pedals, but work great with most shoes: https://www.amazon.com/VP-Components...3722949&sr=8-2
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Old 03-27-19, 03:51 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by rnothog View Post
Thanks for your input, all.

Might try the spd types out on a trainer to see how instinctive they feel to me.

That’s as far as I’m going, for now.

On the trainer is a great place to start, that's how I got my wife get started with clipless pedals, she's never fallen. I advise her and other 'mature' riders starting with clipless pedals to release your 'down' foot long before a stop or possibly stop and don't clip in until you're well under way (not first pedal stroke).

For my part, I started using old-school clips in the '80s and got into clipless pedals about 15 years ago, I'm 50 and been riding daily for decades ... so I'm an experienced and fit rider. I still fall from time-to-time; however, the vast majority of the falls I take are at speed and involve me 'pushing it', basically, I'd fall with or without clipless pedals - I do not take the low-speed-tip-over falls and haven't in many years.
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Old 03-29-19, 09:31 PM
  #30  
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I've been using some SPD mountain pedals on my roadbike on my trainer. About 9 months now, and I just can't reach the point here I would feel comfortable n the street. Maybe I just haven't had my "Aha"moment. But with one replaced knee, and a back full of non-OEM hardware, I'm not ready to risk it...
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Old 03-31-19, 12:42 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by zjrog View Post
I've been using some SPD mountain pedals on my roadbike on my trainer. About 9 months now, and I just can't reach the point here I would feel comfortable n the street. Maybe I just haven't had my "Aha"moment. But with one replaced knee, and a back full of non-OEM hardware, I'm not ready to risk it...
Non-OEM...that’s me, too! Great way to describe us!
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Old 03-31-19, 12:14 PM
  #32  
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I really love my SPD cleats. I don't like to ride without them.

I got my wife to try them. She forgot to clip out and fell and cracked her elbow. Never again, but she still likes the shoes.

I'm 58 years old, and I started wearing toe clips at age 14, so I've been using foot retention for a long time. The actual energy gains are somewhere between slight and nil. It's about feeling secure. It gives you some versatility for what muscles to use when, but it's possible to do very well without cleats.

I say don't bother.

I know some people who have used foot retention a long time and have switched to those big pedals with little spikes. They love them. So I say cleats are not necessary for most of us. I just happen to like them, and I'll stick with them.
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Old 05-27-19, 02:03 PM
  #33  
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Here's an update. About a month ago, I purchased a Specialized Roubaix Comp with Di2 Ultegra. That is a quantum leap from the Giant Roam 1. Whoa!!!

When it came to pedals, I asked the salesman to recommend some good platforms, and he set me up with RaceFace "Affect" pedals. These have multiple metal pins. In combo with some good light hiking shoes, they worked very well.

Then I read a post by DrDyno (My First Experience w/ Clipless Pedals) wherein he cites his first experience with clipless pedals, and thought, "I'm going to give it a try, after all!"

Bought Shimano M540 SPD pedals and SH-ME400 shoes, along with SH-56 multi-directional cleats.

So today, after a bit of snapping-in (and out), I very easily rode away and practiced dismounts for a few minutes.

Then I rode 20 miles on my usual neighborhood route, stopping here and there for more practice, water, and butt breaks. All in all, a completely satisfying experience.

Here's what I noticed: first, easier to clip-in than to adjust/readjust my feet on the platforms when starting and riding; second, found myself spinning more, mashing less, which translated into about 3/4 mile per hour faster, even though it was windy; and finally, felt some additional muscles being put to work (which I can feel a bit more now - minor soreness).

Waited a month and logged a few hundred miles on the new bike before this transition, so I was totally comfortable and familiar with the Roubaix. And, as a motorcyclist, I have a habit of mentally preparing for stops; that seemed to help.

Followed all of the sage advice about starting with very little tension in the pedal adjustments, too.

Last edited by rnothog; 05-27-19 at 03:49 PM.
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Old 05-27-19, 06:58 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by rnothog View Post
And, as a motorcyclist, I have a habit of mentally preparing for stops; that seemed to help.
I don't think this is mentioned as often as it should be. Be aware of your options. Sometimes just one more half pedal is enough to avoid an awkward moment.
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Old 05-27-19, 07:45 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by pbass View Post
I wouldn't do it with your hip replacement history. Get yourself some Five Ten Freeriders and some mountain bike pedals with pins and your feet will stick to the pedals way more than you might think. I use that combo on road and off--I ride a gravel bike primarily and tackle some pretty gnarly stuff fit for a mtb, and my feet never leave the pedals or shift unintentionally. I'm 58, and while I don't have a hip replacement, a falling over injury could really suck! I'm a musician and a broken hand/wrist would put me outta work. Granted, I've hit the dirt a few times trying something silly on the trail, but that's...different, somehow
Speaking of cool flat bar road/gravel bikes, I was just looking at this Niner--looks pretty darn nice: https://ninerbikes.com/products/rlt-9-apex
I'm hooked on drops these days but I'd look at that rig if I was considering flat bar.

+ 1 on this. I like clipless a lot but there is a lot to be said for the mtb pedals with pins. I like them on my mountain bike, commuter, and touring bikes.
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Old 05-28-19, 08:39 AM
  #36  
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I'm glad they're working out for you. I love my SPDs.
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Old 05-28-19, 12:10 PM
  #37  
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There are two kinds of clipless users.
1. Those who have fallen.
2. Those who will fall.
Everyone is in group #2 , even if they're already in group #1 . OTOH, the same could be said for bicycle riders in general. If you're on 2 wheels, you're only temporarily stable. If falling is not an option, then get a trike.

If you're on 2 wheels, there are varying degrees of risk. If you seat is 8 inches off the ground, falling is pretty much a non-event as far as impact goes (although you can still lose skin if you're traveling very fast.)

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Old 06-02-19, 08:23 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by eja_ bottecchia View Post
Are you ready to join BF’s Club Tombay?

What is Club Tombay?

If not you may want to skip clipless pedals. Or go for easier to use Shimano SPD cleats.

With two hips surgeries, I would not risk it.

I am 63 and I’ve had a few falls when I couldn’t unclip fast enough. So far I have been lucky not to break anything during one of these falls.
Check the reference to see the way 50+ used to be. I miss those days.
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Old 06-04-19, 07:30 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by rnothog View Post
Thanks for the input, everyone!

I think the best course for me is to give the Shimano SPD types a try...on a trainer...in a store.
I agree! I've had the SPD style pedals on most of my regular riders. There's a steep but short learning curve with them and the degree of retention is somewhat adjustable and there is also and adjustment allowing a small degree of rotation. The shoes that I normally wear allow for the cleat to be mostly recessed into the sole of the shoe. This allows you to walk like a normal person when you stop at some quaint coffee shop (or bar) along your ride. I can't say that I haven't fallen without being able to "pop" out of the pedals but it hasn't happened many times. Other than a bit of road rash, no serious bodily injury. Damaged pride was the worst injury the last time it happened. With bilateral total hip replacements, I'd certainly be cautious and have the pedals adjusted for the weakest level of retention by the bike mechanic at the shop where you buy the pedals.
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