Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fifty Plus (50+)
Reload this Page >

Do You Worry About Your Heart?

Notices
Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

Do You Worry About Your Heart?

Old 10-30-19, 07:48 AM
  #101  
chas58
Senior Member
 
chas58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Michigan
Posts: 4,490

Bikes: too many of all kinds

Mentioned: 35 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1020 Post(s)
Liked 266 Times in 213 Posts
Originally Posted by bpcyclist View Post
And use what?

If it is important to you, get your heart rate zones (and V02 max) professionally measure. My zones are nothing like what the generic charts say they are. You may be average, or you may not be.
chas58 is offline  
Old 10-30-19, 08:12 AM
  #102  
Miele Man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,284

Bikes: iele Latina, Miele Suprema, Miele Uno LS, Miele Miele Beta, MMTB, Bianchi Model Unknown, Fiori Venezia, Fiori Napoli, VeloSport Adamas AX

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1164 Post(s)
Liked 727 Times in 507 Posts
For a while I was having problems when riding. I didn't know if it was my heart or not so I took things easy until I could get a good doctor. I've been without a doctor for a number of years. As it turned out my blood pressure is a bit high but not that bad. My problems on the bicycle stemmed from my gut pressing into my diaphragm when riding the drops or riding a low drop bar. As I'm losing weight those problems are getting less and less.

Cheers
Miele Man is offline  
Old 10-30-19, 09:23 AM
  #103  
pdlamb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 6,500

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1436 Post(s)
Liked 556 Times in 372 Posts
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
Instead, I concentrate on avoiding the obvious dangers on the bike. That takes up the space which worry might occupy.
This. And if there are no obvious dangers to worry about, I can start thinking about where to refill water bottles and maybe get a snack.
pdlamb is offline  
Old 10-30-19, 09:52 AM
  #104  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 17,225

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2840 Post(s)
Liked 747 Times in 559 Posts
Originally Posted by fly135 View Post
Yeah I know... The crazy things that people believe. BTW, have you met Jesus?
The usual way is by going all out up a long hill to find your max HR. Some say they see Jesus right as they hit max. Me, I see Moses.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Likes For Carbonfiberboy:
Old 10-30-19, 11:20 AM
  #105  
Richard Cranium
Senior Member
 
Richard Cranium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Rural Missouri - mostly central and southeastern
Posts: 2,960

Bikes: 2003 LeMond -various other junk bikes

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 51 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 17 Times in 16 Posts
At some point in time - maybe around October of 2034 - some one will come to discover that "heartbeat rate" - commonly known as heart rate - is not synonymous or analogous to heartbeat stress.

Heart stress is more likely related to the volume of blood being pumped to the aorta and pulmonary vein. (body and lungs) in conjunction with the resistance of all the associated blood vessels.

This means that "stressful heartbeats" have quite a bit to do with blood vessel resistance and the possibility of subsequent poorly oxygenated heart muscle tissue.

I would suggest trying to sprint up a long steep hill directly after pigging-out at a six hour Superbowl party - your mileage may vary....... or you could shovel snow on a cold morning while worrying about being late for work.
Richard Cranium is offline  
Old 10-30-19, 11:23 AM
  #106  
rutan74
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 183

Bikes: Felt ZR3, Specialized Sectur

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 28 Times in 21 Posts
Originally Posted by terrymorse I just finished a book entitled The Haywire Heart - How Too much exercise can kill you, and what you can do to protect your heart.

It's written by athlete cardiologists and Lennard Zinn, who many may know from his books and technical articles on cycling.
Don't want to start a new thread but does anyone have recommendations to finding one of these "athlete cardiologists"? Mine sure is not tuned into athletes. His lobby is filled with people who have major heart issues. For me, as I age, I am losing more and more each year. I sometimes wonder if I have some sort of blockage. My cardio does not think so since the way I ride a bike is not causing any pain or discomfort etc. I have a heart cath about 10 years ago that showed nothing. All my other vitals and blood work are normal to him although I do have HBP.I'd just like to find a cardio that is more in tune with athletes but I can't seem to locate any or am not searching correctly. FWIW, I live relatively close to a heart center in the Charlotte area but no one is really listed as being an "athlete cardiologist".So, anyone have any ideas?john
rutan74 is offline  
Old 10-30-19, 04:49 PM
  #107  
edscott.
Member
 
edscott.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 32
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by big john View Post
Statistically, more of us will succumb to heart disease than any other cause. We can try to mitigate the odds with our diet and behavior but we can't control genetics.
I'm in the high cholesterol genetics group. And yes, you can do something about genetics. In my case it's just a matter of eating raw beetroot. That has got me down from 254 to 200 (anthocyanin effect). Apart from the healthy side effects, it's great to carry on a long ride instead of industrialized goey energy bars. It has a sh*tload of energy and fiber to keep the release into the bloodstream at a measured pace. Combine it with jicama, lime and salt and it also kicks in against dehydration. Carry it in a ziplock bag and eat it with a plastic fork or chopsticks when the group ride stops for this or that reason. And that red color that drips down onto my white beard really raises some eyebrows.
edscott. is offline  
Likes For edscott.:
Old 10-30-19, 05:54 PM
  #108  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 17,225

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2840 Post(s)
Liked 747 Times in 559 Posts
Originally Posted by rutan74 View Post
Originally Posted by terrymorse I just finished a book entitled The Haywire Heart - How Too much exercise can kill you, and what you can do to protect your heart.

It's written by athlete cardiologists and Lennard Zinn, who many may know from his books and technical articles on cycling.
Don't want to start a new thread but does anyone have recommendations to finding one of these "athlete cardiologists"? Mine sure is not tuned into athletes. His lobby is filled with people who have major heart issues. For me, as I age, I am losing more and more each year. I sometimes wonder if I have some sort of blockage. My cardio does not think so since the way I ride a bike is not causing any pain or discomfort etc. I have a heart cath about 10 years ago that showed nothing. All my other vitals and blood work are normal to him although I do have HBP.I'd just like to find a cardio that is more in tune with athletes but I can't seem to locate any or am not searching correctly. FWIW, I live relatively close to a heart center in the Charlotte area but no one is really listed as being an "athlete cardiologist".So, anyone have any ideas?john
You raise an interesting point. I know quite a few doctors and have seen others as a patient. IMO the first reaction of a doc like a cardiologist is, "Get out of my office if you aren't in danger of dying of whatever in the near future, because I have plenty of folks in that position sitting in my waiting room while I talk to you." Triage, just like you saw. That said, I'm sure there are cardiologists attached to the big sporting labs. Think money.

There are several things that can cause problems other than blockages, but those will probably show up on an EKG or simple physical with a stethoscope. Your cardio is mostly likely correct. Not profitable to second-guess your doc.

It's normal to lose cardiovascular ability with age. It just happens. All you can do is to do what you can. I noticed it starting to really fall off at 64. At 74, the year-by-year difference is noticeable, and I'm aging slower than most.

You can try taking 1g of sodium nitrate every morning for your BP. Not a big cure, but it helps, same as drinking beet juice. Ask your doc.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 10-30-19, 06:16 PM
  #109  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 17,225

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2840 Post(s)
Liked 747 Times in 559 Posts
Originally Posted by Richard Cranium View Post
At some point in time - maybe around October of 2034 - some one will come to discover that "heartbeat rate" - commonly known as heart rate - is not synonymous or analogous to heartbeat stress.

Heart stress is more likely related to the volume of blood being pumped to the aorta and pulmonary vein. (body and lungs) in conjunction with the resistance of all the associated blood vessels.

This means that "stressful heartbeats" have quite a bit to do with blood vessel resistance and the possibility of subsequent poorly oxygenated heart muscle tissue.

I would suggest trying to sprint up a long steep hill directly after pigging-out at a six hour Superbowl party - your mileage may vary....... or you could shovel snow on a cold morning while worrying about being late for work.
I'm not sure that this is true. There's a possibility that the same hormones/chemicals which increase HR also relax the arterial walls, the endothelium releasing NO. That's an interesting conjecture. I looked into it a little, but no solid info.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 10-30-19, 06:35 PM
  #110  
NomarsGirl
Senior Member
 
NomarsGirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Easton, MA
Posts: 535

Bikes: Specialized Ruby Sport

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 273 Post(s)
Liked 192 Times in 114 Posts
Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Why are you "half dead" at 64?
Because he plans to live to be 128. 64 is halfway there.
NomarsGirl is offline  
Likes For NomarsGirl:
Old 10-30-19, 06:58 PM
  #111  
Biker395 
Seat Sniffer
 
Biker395's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: SoCal
Posts: 5,163

Bikes: 2008 Scott CR1 Pro; 2006 Schwinn Fastback Pro and 1996 Colnago Decor Super C96; 2003 Univega Alpina 700; 2000 Schwinn Super Sport

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 739 Post(s)
Liked 634 Times in 262 Posts
Originally Posted by NomarsGirl View Post
Because he plans to live to be 128. 64 is halfway there.
Nah ... aging isn't linear. We all know it accelerates every year. I'm nearing the cliff myself. lol
__________________
Proud parent of a happy inner child ...

Biker395 is offline  
Old 10-31-19, 12:27 PM
  #112  
Koyote
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 3,061
Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2185 Post(s)
Liked 2,796 Times in 1,267 Posts
Originally Posted by fly135 View Post
Although this isn't directly relevant to your question, I was listening to an article on the radio talking about top tier cyclists needing to have a HR monitor with an alarm while they sleep. Apparently their resting HR is so low that they can die in their sleep. When their HR drops too low the alarm goes off and they have to start exercising to increase their HR.
I believe this was more of an issue in the early days of EPO doping. EPO produces more red blood cells, which essentially thickens the blood; if that happens to a cyclist who already has a lower-than-normal resting HR, then yes, sleeping can pose risks.

As for the OP's question: an annual physical should reveal heart problems; if there are none, I don't see any reason why vigorous exercise would pose a problem. In fact, my physician seems rather pleased at the amount of cycling I'm doing.
Koyote is offline  
Likes For Koyote:
Old 10-31-19, 07:43 PM
  #113  
fly135
Senior Member
 
fly135's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 149

Bikes: iZip E3 Peak DS, Magnum Metro, GT Tachyon, K2 Sidewinder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 65 Post(s)
Liked 35 Times in 20 Posts
Took my new HR sensor out for a 2nd longer ride today that had some hills. Got my max HR (161) slightly above the 220-age rule (220-64=156) that I should ignore.


fly135 is offline  
Old 11-01-19, 05:40 AM
  #114  
Koyote
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 3,061
Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2185 Post(s)
Liked 2,796 Times in 1,267 Posts
Originally Posted by fly135 View Post
Took my new HR sensor out for a 2nd longer ride today that had some hills. Got my max HR (161) slightly above the 220-age rule (220-64=156) that I should ignore.
You should definitely ignore that "rule." I'm 56 years old, and my max recorded HR this year was 187. And no, I didn't die.
Koyote is offline  
Old 11-01-19, 09:05 AM
  #115  
fly135
Senior Member
 
fly135's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 149

Bikes: iZip E3 Peak DS, Magnum Metro, GT Tachyon, K2 Sidewinder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 65 Post(s)
Liked 35 Times in 20 Posts
Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
You should definitely ignore that "rule." I'm 56 years old, and my max recorded HR this year was 187. And no, I didn't die.
Still trying to sort this out. I was googling "max hr" to see what your HR means overall. One article (link below) says that you shouldn't be able to maintain "zone 5" (i.e. HR >= 90% Max) for more than a short period. If you take out the first mile my avg HR would be over 150 for 35 minutes. So 150/89% (zone 4) would be a max hr of 168. So I still haven't achieved my max hr apparently.

This ride was a lot of work. I typically ride an eMTB even though it's not off road. Got my HR sensor and decided to take out the regular road bike I bought as a fixer upper in June to learn out to work on bicycles. Finally got around to putting the new tires on it last Wed, and figured I'd put my self to the test.

https://www.polar.com/blog/running-h...-zones-basics/
fly135 is offline  
Old 11-01-19, 09:16 AM
  #116  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: High Falls, NY, USA
Posts: 39,707

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 482 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6774 Post(s)
Liked 1,371 Times in 880 Posts
I'm 58, and no, I don't worry about my heart. Should I? I have very low cholesterol as a result of genetics. I've spent my entire life at or very close to my ideal weight.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 11-01-19, 10:13 AM
  #117  
big john
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 15,597
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2250 Post(s)
Liked 1,609 Times in 924 Posts
Originally Posted by fly135 View Post
Still trying to sort this out. I was googling "max hr" to see what your HR means overall. One article (link below) says that you shouldn't be able to maintain "zone 5" (i.e. HR >= 90% Max) for more than a short period. If you take out the first mile my avg HR would be over 150 for 35 minutes. So 150/89% (zone 4) would be a max hr of 168. So I still haven't achieved my max hr apparently.

This ride was a lot of work. I typically ride an eMTB even though it's not off road. Got my HR sensor and decided to take out the regular road bike I bought as a fixer upper in June to learn out to work on bicycles. Finally got around to putting the new tires on it last Wed, and figured I'd put my self to the test.

https://www.polar.com/blog/running-h...-zones-basics/
Your max hr is just that, the highest rate you can achieve when at full effort. Sprint up a steep hill as hard as you can should give you your max. It doesn't matter what some chart says. We can all have different rates even if we have the same age. or someone older can have a higher rate than someone younger.
big john is offline  
Likes For big john:
Old 11-01-19, 10:17 AM
  #118  
pdlamb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 6,500

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1436 Post(s)
Liked 556 Times in 372 Posts
Originally Posted by rutan74 View Post
Don't want to start a new thread but does anyone have recommendations to finding one of these "athlete cardiologists"? … FWIW, I live relatively close to a heart center in the Charlotte area but no one is really listed as being an "athlete cardiologist".So, anyone have any ideas?john
I found one by chance; he put my stent in, and turned out to be a cyclist himself. (I've passed him a couple times as we commute to work since then!)

My best idea is to find some cardiac nurses, and ask them if any of the cardiologists in town are athletes. Probably doesn't have to be a cyclist. Most doctors are like most people -- they'll spend an awful lot of time doing things that involve sitting down. The ones who bike to work, or run races, are so unusual that word gets around. The best of these will be the ones who follow the literature and think critically about journal papers, newspapers, and web articles. If you can find one of these, arrange to get an appointment ASAP (it may be a few months if you're not dying).
pdlamb is offline  
Likes For pdlamb:
Old 11-01-19, 10:18 AM
  #119  
dagray 
Senior Member
 
dagray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Boardman, Oregon, USA
Posts: 1,748

Bikes: Orbea Orca,Raleigh Talus 29er, Centurion Le Mans 12 speed

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 164 Post(s)
Liked 83 Times in 42 Posts
I wear a heart rate monitor when I ride so that I can see what my heart rate is if I start feeling funky while riding. If my heart rate is too high and I can keep riding I try to switch gears to an easier gear and lower my cadence until my heart rate has gone back down, or I coast for a bit. I try not to stop riding, but at times I have to (like when I go over my max heart rate of 174 for a couple minutes and my brain is telling my body it needs more Oxygen... you know that can't get a good breath sensation).
__________________
If you see an old fat guy levitating through town with his legs pumping furiously... well don't worry there is a bicycle underneath me.
dagray is offline  
Old 11-01-19, 12:51 PM
  #120  
rutan74
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 183

Bikes: Felt ZR3, Specialized Sectur

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 28 Times in 21 Posts
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
You raise an interesting point. I know quite a few doctors and have seen others as a patient. IMO the first reaction of a doc like a cardiologist is, "Get out of my office if you aren't in danger of dying of whatever in the near future, because I have plenty of folks in that position sitting in my waiting room while I talk to you." Triage, just like you saw. That said, I'm sure there are cardiologists attached to the big sporting labs. Think money.


There are several things that can cause problems other than blockages, but those will probably show up on an EKG or simple physical with a stethoscope. Your cardio is mostly likely correct. Not profitable to second-guess your doc.


It's normal to lose cardiovascular ability with age. It just happens. All you can do is to do what you can. I noticed it starting to really fall off at 64. At 74, the year-by-year difference is noticeable, and I'm aging slower than most.


You can try taking 1g of sodium nitrate every morning for your BP. Not a big cure, but it helps, same as drinking beet juice. Ask your doc.



Well, you pretty much hit the nail on the head describing my cardio. He sees me and pretty much says what are you complaining about? I'm 63, have done 3 centuries, climbed Mt Mitchell 4 times and countless other rides but I do worry a bit just as this thread says. Maybe I am being overly picky but since my riding friend has gone thru so much and he is younger and since I was cathed 10 years ago, I do get a bit worried at times.


Look, I am not dying out there but I know when things are not right or at least don't feel right. Just a huge power loss. No pain or shortness of breath, just no power mid ride sometimes. Maybe it is just the aging process and maybe it is not. I simply would like to know. My cardio will not do the tests since it is not warranted by any of my current factors which means insurance won't pay for it either.


So, in my case I guess I just carry on. Yes, I do realize that a 60 year old heart will not pump as much blood as a 30 year old heart. I know as you age, arteries become less elastic and hardening of the arteries begins. I know all this so I am torn between the aging thing and is there anything I should be worried about. The problem I see is finding a doctor, especially one that deals with runners etc., is really hard. I could try and find the cardio group or MD that deals with the Charlotte Panthers but I have not looked into that yet. There are big groups around the university area in Raleigh, but that is a 2 hour ride for me.


It is just a problem for many of us. Foot doctor? No problem. Orthopedic? I have one that is a cyclist. Cardiologist? Nope, only for the really bad heart problems.


john
rutan74 is offline  
Old 11-01-19, 12:55 PM
  #121  
rutan74
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 183

Bikes: Felt ZR3, Specialized Sectur

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 28 Times in 21 Posts
Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
I found one by chance; he put my stent in, and turned out to be a cyclist himself. (I've passed him a couple times as we commute to work since then!)

My best idea is to find some cardiac nurses, and ask them if any of the cardiologists in town are athletes. Probably doesn't have to be a cyclist. Most doctors are like most people -- they'll spend an awful lot of time doing things that involve sitting down. The ones who bike to work, or run races, are so unusual that word gets around. The best of these will be the ones who follow the literature and think critically about journal papers, newspapers, and web articles. If you can find one of these, arrange to get an appointment ASAP (it may be a few months if you're not dying).
Thanks. I will start to ask around. I seriously doubt I would need a stent but again I don't know. My data from 10 years ago said I was clean, under 10 percent plaque. So, that was 10 years ago. I am sure things have changed since then or at least they could have changed.

I'd just like a cardiologist who understands the athlete, that is all.

john
rutan74 is offline  
Old 11-01-19, 01:03 PM
  #122  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 17,225

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2840 Post(s)
Liked 747 Times in 559 Posts
Originally Posted by rutan74 View Post
<snip> Look, I am not dying out there but I know when things are not right or at least don't feel right. Just a huge power loss. No pain or shortness of breath, just no power mid ride sometimes. Maybe it is just the aging process and maybe it is not. I simply would like to know. My cardio will not do the tests since it is not warranted by any of my current factors which means insurance won't pay for it either.<snip>

john
Do you use a HRM? What's happening there when you lose power? HR goes way down, skyrockets, stays the same as when you had good power? I know that when I lose power, I need to eat, preferably about 100 cal. of very fast carbs, like a gel or Shot Blok - even if I don't feel hungry. Have you tried that? My power drop is accompanied by a HR drop.

Edit: I meant to write 100 calories, corrected that.
__________________
Results matter

Last edited by Carbonfiberboy; 11-01-19 at 04:04 PM.
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Likes For Carbonfiberboy:
Old 11-04-19, 09:44 PM
  #123  
fastcarbon
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: SoCal
Posts: 307

Bikes: SL6 S Works Tarmac, 7 series Trek Madone, Saris Hammer Smart Trainer, Eddie Merckx, Ciocc, Trek 5900, DeRosa, Peugot, Diverge Gravel

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 28 Times in 22 Posts
Do you worry about your heart

At 77 my resting HR is in the low 40's and I continue to wake up in the morning; my max HR has unfortunately dropped by 10 beats due to an anti Arrhythmic drug I take due to a doctor giving me a med that caused Ventricle tachycardia . Because of that I also have an implantable cardiac defibrillator that has never gone off. I guess it is a safety valve in a way. "The Haywire Heart" is good reading but I am not sure what good it is to a competitive cyclist. My heart is structurally 100% but I have had electrical problems over the last 10 years including A-Fib and Atrial Flutter which started with years of time trialing at 96-98% of max heart rate. My electrophysiologist keeps me on the bike with cardiac ablations when necessary. As long as I can stay with the competitive 50 year olds I am happy. I still train with power and use software that keeps me from over-training.
fastcarbon is offline  
Old 11-04-19, 09:55 PM
  #124  
bpcyclist
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Portland
Posts: 1,115
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 447 Post(s)
Liked 359 Times in 224 Posts
Thanks very much for that, @fastcarbon. Glad you are still able to do it after all that electrical trouble. And I would venture to offer that you may be one of the safest riders on this board, given that you now have an AICD on-board. That thing is literally a life-saver.

Keep after it. And thanks for the inspiration. I have some health issues of my own at a mere 55 and it seems unlikely I will know what it's like to ride at 77. But you never know...
bpcyclist is offline  
Old 11-05-19, 12:29 PM
  #125  
Biker395 
Seat Sniffer
 
Biker395's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: SoCal
Posts: 5,163

Bikes: 2008 Scott CR1 Pro; 2006 Schwinn Fastback Pro and 1996 Colnago Decor Super C96; 2003 Univega Alpina 700; 2000 Schwinn Super Sport

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 739 Post(s)
Liked 634 Times in 262 Posts
My doc's eyebrows raised when I told him about my older brother's mini-strokes he got when he was 58 or so.

I told him my brother was morbidly obese, diabetic, ate terribly and got zero exercise, but he seemed to think it made sense to get a corotid ultrasound anyway.

Almost $200 and not payable through insurance, and I thought it was probably a waste of time/money.

The results showed my IMT to be in the 25th percentile for people my age.

That's it ... no more cardiac tests for me for a while. I'm going to find something else to worry about. There are plenty of other things on that list.
__________________
Proud parent of a happy inner child ...

Biker395 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.