Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fifty Plus (50+)
Reload this Page >

An American cycle tours in Europe, 16 December 1944

Notices
Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

An American cycle tours in Europe, 16 December 1944

Old 12-16-19, 07:51 AM
  #1  
tcs
Palmer
Thread Starter
 
tcs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Parts Unknown
Posts: 6,164

Bikes: 1980 Mike Melton, 1982 Stumpjumper, 1982 Santana, 1984 Alex Moulton AM, 2008 BikeFriday tikit T-11, 2010 Dawes Briercliffe, 2017 Dahon Curl i5, 2019 Surly ½DT14

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 670 Post(s)
Liked 160 Times in 110 Posts
An American cycle tours in Europe, 16 December 1944

On December 16th, 1944, American doctor Major Clifford Graves went on a short cycle tour in Eastern Belgium.


Dr. Graves was a combat surgeon supporting the 106th Division and enjoying a quiet pre-Christmas respite in the war tempo when 25 German divisions broke through the lines, beginning what is known today as the Battle of the Bulge.



With the German tanks only miles away, Major Graves unloaded his medical equipment truck and on-boarded as many casualties from the field hospital as possible. By the time he got this organized and sent the truck west on the narrow road, the German tanks had arrived at the far end of the small village where the field hospital was located.



Dr. Graves didn’t want to be captured. What to do? Well, in the year and a half he’d spent in England before D-Day, he’d purchased a derailleur geared touring bicycle and did a little touring in England, Scotland and Wales. He’d surreptitiously crated the bicycle and included it in the medical equipment when they’d deployed to France the previous June. He hurriedly broke the crate apart and assembled his bicycle. By the time he got the tires pumped, the lead Panzer was just a block away. With a farewell to the GIs in the village who had no transportation, he rode out on the main road right in front of the lead German tank and pedaled away.



It was a horrible, cold, wet, desperate cycle tour that day, Dr. Graves at first barely staying ahead of the blitzkrieging Panzers. Graves came under German airborne ground attack, being strafed and at one point bombed. He passed through Malmedy and briefed members of the 285th Field Artillery Observation Battalion about what he knew of the situation behind him. These GIs would be captured and murdered by SS troopers the next morning.



Late in the afternoon Major Graves arrived at Spa, where some sketchy semblance of order had been established in the retreat. Reporting to the temporary HQ, he created as much of a sensation as possible under the chaotic conditions when he explained to command that he’d escaped the German advance on a bicycle. As an orderly defense was thrown together, he was given a medical truck and a driver and told to head south to Bastogne, where heavy fighting was reported and resultant casualties anticipated. Command warned Graves at Spa that German soldiers wearing American uniforms had been captured during the day.



He tossed his bike in the back of the deuce-and-a-half and they headed out in the gathering twilight. Well after dark he and his driver thought they were on the main road to Bastogne, but observed the road they were on was getting narrower, not wider. Major Graves decided they had taken a wrong turn and should backtrack on what had become a tiny country lane, and he told his driver to wait while he scouted ahead on his bicycle for a place they could turn the big truck around without getting stuck. Just up the way, he found a small crossroads. Returning to the truck he informed his driver and led him to the turn-around. As the driver was executing a multi-point turn, Graves spotted by the light of an inexplicably burning farmhouse what he assumed must be an American tank column approaching. He rode his bicycle up to the front tank, waving his handkerchief, pointing and shouting that there was a truck blocking the road just up ahead. The tank hatch popped open and the commander shouted something back.



Graves realized the officer was shouting in German.



He quickly analyzed the situation. He guessed they hadn’t shot him or just run him down with the tank because, due to his bold approach on a bicycle, they had misidentified him as one of the German saboteurs. He shouted back to the tank commander the only German that came to mind: ‘Ja! Ja! Ja! Ja! Ja! Ja!’ With a wave, he turned the bike around and sprinted back down the road. He tossed his bike in the truck and told his driver to head back to secure American territory as fast as they could go.



Dr. Graves survived the day without getting captured and survived the war. In the post-war occupation, he did some more touring on the Continent before returning to America and setting up a surgery practice in La Jolla, California. With the enthusiastic support of other like-minded Americans, he founded the International Bicycle Touring Society and toured throughout North America, Europe, Japan, New Zealand and China.



Decades later, Dr. Graves related his amazing story in Bicycling! and American Wheelman magazines and made it the lead chapter in his autobiography, ‘My Life on Two Wheels’.



More on Dr. Graves:

https://www.bicycleadventureclub.org...ure%20Club.pdf





Take away: Always bring your bicycle. You’ll almost certainly have more fun than if you don’t bring it, and you never know - it could save your life.
tcs is offline  
Old 12-16-19, 10:53 AM
  #2  
shelbyfv
Senior Member
 
shelbyfv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 6,575
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1571 Post(s)
Liked 784 Times in 475 Posts
Nice story though copy and paste needs attribution. IIRC he also organized European bike tours for rich kids in California. They would order fancy Rene Herse bikes and "rough it" cruising around post war France.
shelbyfv is offline  
Old 12-16-19, 11:32 AM
  #3  
tcs
Palmer
Thread Starter
 
tcs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Parts Unknown
Posts: 6,164

Bikes: 1980 Mike Melton, 1982 Stumpjumper, 1982 Santana, 1984 Alex Moulton AM, 2008 BikeFriday tikit T-11, 2010 Dawes Briercliffe, 2017 Dahon Curl i5, 2019 Surly ½DT14

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 670 Post(s)
Liked 160 Times in 110 Posts
Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
Nice story though copy and paste needs attribution.
???
tcs is offline  
Likes For tcs:
Old 12-16-19, 05:25 PM
  #4  
GeezyRider 
Another Bozo on the Bus
 
GeezyRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Delaware Sea Shore
Posts: 187

Bikes: 1986 Panasonic DX-3000, 1996 Trek Multitrack 720, 2002 Giant Iguana, 2015 Mercier Galaxy SC1

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 48 Post(s)
Liked 83 Times in 53 Posts
Thanks for sharing this story about Dr. Graves--I enjoyed it very much.
__________________
Don
GeezyRider is offline  
Likes For GeezyRider:
Old 12-16-19, 08:25 PM
  #5  
Cougrrcj 
Over forty victim of Fate
 
Cougrrcj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 3,329

Bikes: A few...

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 409 Post(s)
Liked 118 Times in 83 Posts
Originally Posted by tcs View Post
???
Obviously copied from a published article. The source of the article should be included to avoid possible copyright infringements.
Cougrrcj is offline  
Old 12-16-19, 09:05 PM
  #6  
tcs
Palmer
Thread Starter
 
tcs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Parts Unknown
Posts: 6,164

Bikes: 1980 Mike Melton, 1982 Stumpjumper, 1982 Santana, 1984 Alex Moulton AM, 2008 BikeFriday tikit T-11, 2010 Dawes Briercliffe, 2017 Dahon Curl i5, 2019 Surly ½DT14

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 670 Post(s)
Liked 160 Times in 110 Posts
Originally Posted by Cougrrcj View Post
Obviously copied from a published article. The source of the article should be included to avoid possible copyright infringements.
I got $1000 that says I wrote every word in that post myself. How about it, shelbyfv and Cougrrcj, wanna put your money where your mouth is?

What led you to your conclusions without ascertaining any facts - you think I'm not smart enough to string those words together, or you don't think your fellow 50+ers are worth a guy writing something up for their education and entertainment?

Let's say if you can prove I cut and pasted that (shouldn't be hard, since it's 'obvious'), I'll quit this list forever - but if you can't you guys can take your troll show and leave for good?

Man, you try to honor a brave American soldier on the 75th anniversary of his amazing bicycling feat, and this is the thanks you get.

Last edited by tcs; 12-16-19 at 09:21 PM.
tcs is offline  
Likes For tcs:
Old 12-16-19, 09:19 PM
  #7  
tcs
Palmer
Thread Starter
 
tcs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Parts Unknown
Posts: 6,164

Bikes: 1980 Mike Melton, 1982 Stumpjumper, 1982 Santana, 1984 Alex Moulton AM, 2008 BikeFriday tikit T-11, 2010 Dawes Briercliffe, 2017 Dahon Curl i5, 2019 Surly ½DT14

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 670 Post(s)
Liked 160 Times in 110 Posts
BTW, guys, I wrote for public presentations for 20 years. I've written for cycling magazines. I've written seven full-length novels. You'll find some writing I did years ago on Sheldon Brown's web site (he was a fan).

But rest assured this is the last time I waste my talent on the peanut gallery here.
tcs is offline  
Old 12-16-19, 10:06 PM
  #8  
tcs
Palmer
Thread Starter
 
tcs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Parts Unknown
Posts: 6,164

Bikes: 1980 Mike Melton, 1982 Stumpjumper, 1982 Santana, 1984 Alex Moulton AM, 2008 BikeFriday tikit T-11, 2010 Dawes Briercliffe, 2017 Dahon Curl i5, 2019 Surly ½DT14

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 670 Post(s)
Liked 160 Times in 110 Posts
Here's the link to my old stuff on Sheldon's site:

https://www.sheldonbrown.com/shaddox.html

I wrote those funny little sketches and short stories for the amusement and entertainment of my fellow listers and none of them ever immediately, without inquiry and without facts accused me of stealing another author's work and presenting it as my own. They were a different cut of cloth, I suppose.
tcs is offline  
Old 12-17-19, 12:11 AM
  #9  
tcs
Palmer
Thread Starter
 
tcs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Parts Unknown
Posts: 6,164

Bikes: 1980 Mike Melton, 1982 Stumpjumper, 1982 Santana, 1984 Alex Moulton AM, 2008 BikeFriday tikit T-11, 2010 Dawes Briercliffe, 2017 Dahon Curl i5, 2019 Surly ½DT14

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 670 Post(s)
Liked 160 Times in 110 Posts
Here's a link to my first novel:
https://www.wattpad.com/story/234902...ing-in-glasgow

and here's a link to my 6th novel:
https://www.wattpad.com/story/234220...fferent-puzzle

Together these stories add up to ~350,000 words and I guarantee you'll have time to finish them both before shelbyfv and Cougrrcj can lend the slightest credence to their aspersions.
tcs is offline  
Old 12-17-19, 09:24 AM
  #10  
shelbyfv
Senior Member
 
shelbyfv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 6,575
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1571 Post(s)
Liked 784 Times in 475 Posts
Wow, don't think anyone expected to trigger all that! Nevertheless, I checked the links and that is indeed an impressive volume of words. The internet has definitely leveled the playing field for authors. No need for pesky impediments like editors, publishers, critics, sales, etc. Your "bodice buster" genre seems very popular as well. I'm overwhelmed by those when I look for ebooks on my library website.
shelbyfv is offline  
Old 12-17-19, 07:17 PM
  #11  
TiHabanero
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,994
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1015 Post(s)
Liked 290 Times in 163 Posts
As a failed author, I can speak openly about the publishing industry, and my view is that they keep a lot of crap out of print. Stuff that is poorly written, on the level of high school creative writing. I look at what I submitted in the past and cringe to think that I thought this was good work. It was the best I was able to do at the time, but no where near good enough to earn a soft cover let alone a hard cover and marketing money.

The internet has not evened the playing field, it has expanded it, however I do question the quality of work out there and where it is to lead us in the future by determining what is acceptable quality.

Note, I have not read any thing posted by the poster who provided links to his work, and this is not a criticism of said work.
TiHabanero is offline  
Likes For TiHabanero:
Old 12-18-19, 08:19 AM
  #12  
MattTheHat 
Senior Member
 
MattTheHat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Allen, TX
Posts: 1,366

Bikes: '20 Specialized Roubaix Expert, '18 Specialized Diverge Comp

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 459 Post(s)
Liked 912 Times in 431 Posts
Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
Wow, don't think anyone expected to trigger all that! Nevertheless, I checked the links and that is indeed an impressive volume of words. The internet has definitely leveled the playing field for authors. No need for pesky impediments like editors, publishers, critics, sales, etc. Your "bodice buster" genre seems very popular as well. I'm overwhelmed by those when I look for ebooks on my library website.
A simple apology would have been the correct response.
__________________

MattTheHat is offline  
Likes For MattTheHat:
Old 12-18-19, 09:22 AM
  #13  
MattTheHat 
Senior Member
 
MattTheHat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Allen, TX
Posts: 1,366

Bikes: '20 Specialized Roubaix Expert, '18 Specialized Diverge Comp

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 459 Post(s)
Liked 912 Times in 431 Posts
Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
It's OK, folks over react often on the internet. I'm not asking for an apology.
It's funny that you admit to over reacting, but in post #10 you seem to indicate the OP over reacted.
__________________

MattTheHat is offline  
Likes For MattTheHat:
Old 12-18-19, 03:30 PM
  #14  
zjrog
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,590

Bikes: 1986 KHS Fiero, 1989 Trek 950, 1990 Trek 7000, 1991 Gary Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo, 1992 Trek 1400, 1997 Cannondale CAD2 R300, 1998 Cannondale CAD2 R200, 2002 Marin San Rafael, 2006 Cannondale CAAD8 R1000, 2010 Performance Access XCL9R

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 259 Post(s)
Liked 193 Times in 139 Posts
I'd read about him ears ago.

Unrelated to that story. I took a bike with me when I was deployed on an Aircraft Carrier. Riding in other countries was usually fun and exciting, Hong Kong on the other hand, was TERRIFYING! Best ride for me was in Hobart Tasmania for a few days. Incredible place and people...
zjrog is offline  
Old 12-19-19, 08:46 AM
  #15  
Siu Blue Wind
BACK2ME
 
Siu Blue Wind's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 13,132
Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1823 Post(s)
Liked 289 Times in 181 Posts
shelby please leave this thread.
__________________
Originally Posted by making View Post
Please dont outsmart the censor. That is a very expensive censor and every time one of you guys outsmart it it makes someone at the home office feel bad. We dont wanna do that. So dont cleverly disguise bad words.
Siu Blue Wind is offline  
Likes For Siu Blue Wind:
Old 12-19-19, 08:52 AM
  #16  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 16,821

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4443 Post(s)
Liked 732 Times in 530 Posts
tcs thanks for posting this. It is a neat read.
bikemig is online now  
Old 12-19-19, 01:49 PM
  #17  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 11,187

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 182 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3556 Post(s)
Liked 1,049 Times in 706 Posts
Great story, @tcs, thanks.

And try to shrug off the occasional sniping. It seems to be a seasonal thing. I'm seeing a lot of it recently on BF and most sites and social media post I follow. I suspect the stress of the era rubs off on folks and they tend to become inured to bluntness and neglect nuance of expression.
canklecat is offline  
Old 12-19-19, 02:21 PM
  #18  
BlazingPedals
Senior Member
 
BlazingPedals's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middle of da Mitten
Posts: 11,475

Bikes: Trek 7500, RANS V-Rex, Optima Baron, Velokraft NoCom, M-5 Carbon Highracer, Catrike Speed

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1135 Post(s)
Liked 202 Times in 147 Posts
Thanks, TCS.
BlazingPedals is offline  
Old 12-19-19, 03:03 PM
  #19  
ultrarider7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 183

Bikes: Cannondale Quick Carbon 1, BIANCHI INFINITO CV DISC ULTEGRA

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 55 Post(s)
Liked 169 Times in 59 Posts
Thanks for sharing

Decades later, Dr. Graves related his amazing story in Bicycling! and American Wheelman magazines and made it the lead chapter in his autobiography, ‘My Life on Two Wheels’.



More on Dr. Graves:

https://www.bicycleadventureclub.org...ure%20Club.pdf

I enjoyed your story. You have a way of making it come to life, truly a gift.





Take away: Always bring your bicycle. You’ll almost certainly have more fun than if you don’t bring it, and you never know - it could save your life.[/QUOTE]
ultrarider7 is offline  
Old 12-21-19, 03:03 AM
  #20  
Cougrrcj 
Over forty victim of Fate
 
Cougrrcj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 3,329

Bikes: A few...

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 409 Post(s)
Liked 118 Times in 83 Posts
I have been thinking of a proper response to the OPs lashing out at Shelbyfv and myself for several days. Trying to find the right words. Writing is not my forte.

The OPs initial post is not the sort of writing one normally finds on a message forum. Very polished, professional writing. Without any further explanation or referencing made by the OP, the post could be taken to be a 'cut and paste' from a published writing.

WW2 history is a hobby of mine. I have an entire bookcase dedicated to WW2 history. The initial post would seem to indicate that much research had taken place, some of it being direct quoted conversation of those present at the time. Historical research takes time and effort. I get it.

Plagiarism stinks, and with the advent of instant 'knowledge' thanks to the Internet, many people will cut and paste from a copyrighted piece without citing the reference. By asking for a source, I merely wanted to make sure that the researcher and author get the credit that they deserve. I'm sure the OP would be justifiably outraged if someone were to 'steal' his work and post it somewhere without the proper attribution.

Now that I've explained myself (poorly, because I am not a writer) I hope that if the OP comes back to this thread, he will accept my explanation and my apology. No personal offense was intended.
__________________
'75 Fuji S-10S bought new, 52k+ miles and still going!
'84 Univega Gran Tourismo
'84 Univega Viva Sport
'86 Miyata 710
'90 Schwinn Woodlands
Unknown brand MTB of questionable lineage aka 'Mutt Trail Bike'
Plus or minus a few others from time-to-time


Last edited by Cougrrcj; 12-22-19 at 06:58 PM.
Cougrrcj is offline  
Likes For Cougrrcj:
Old 12-21-19, 07:23 AM
  #21  
ironwood
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Boston area
Posts: 1,903

Bikes: 1984 Bridgestone 400 1985Univega nouevo sport 650b conversion 1993b'stone RBT 1985 Schwinn Tempo

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 472 Post(s)
Liked 68 Times in 46 Posts
Bicycle Quarterly issue #22 has an article about the AYH bicycle tours organized by Dr. Graves. The Bicycles were not the expensive Rene Herse models but an entry level model. Bicycle touring and hosteling were not simply for "rich kids" in the fifties and early sixties. The first "Let's Go" was subtitled "Europe on 5 dollars a day" as I recall. Europe was cheap for Americans back then, but trans- atlantic transportation was not; I wish I had known about these tours back in the early sixties.
ironwood is offline  
Old 12-22-19, 08:56 AM
  #22  
Jim from Boston
Senior Member
 
Jim from Boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 7,370
Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 797 Post(s)
Liked 202 Times in 159 Posts
An American cycle tours in Europe, 16 December 1944
Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
Nice story though copy and paste needs attribution.
Originally Posted by tcs View Post
???
Originally Posted by Cougrrcj View Post
Obviously copied from a published article. The source of the article should be included to avoid possible copyright infringements.
Originally Posted by tcs View Post
I got $1000 that says I wrote every word in that post myself. How about it, shelbyfv and Cougrrcj, wanna put your money where your mouth is?

What led you to your conclusions without ascertaining any facts - you think I'm not smart enough to string those words together, or you don't think your fellow 50+ers are worth a guy writing something up for their education and entertainment?

Let's say if you can prove I cut and pasted that (shouldn't be hard, since it's 'obvious'), I'll quit this list forever - but if you can't you guys can take your troll show and leave for good?
Originally Posted by Siu Blue Wind View Post
shelby please leave this thread.
Originally Posted by Cougrrcj View Post
I have been thinking of a proper response to the OPs lashing out at Shelbyfv and myself for several days. Trying to find the right words. Writing is not my forte.

The OPs initial post is not the sort of writing one normally finds on a message forum. Very polished, professional writing. Without any further explanation or referencing made by the OP, the post could be taken to be a 'cut and paste' from a published writing.

Plagiarism stinks, and with the advent of instant 'knowledge' thanks to the Internet, many people will cut and paste from a copyrighted piece without citing the reference. .

By asking for a source, I merely wanted to make sure that the researcher and author get the credit that they deserve. I'm sure the OP would be justifiably outraged if someone were to 'steal' his work and post it somewhere without the proper attribution.

Now that I've explained myself (poorly, because I am not a writer) I hope that if the OP comes back to this thread, he will accept my explanation and my apology. No personal offense was intended.
I enjoyed reading the OP story, indeed well written and I glossed over the subsequent brouhaha, until I read the last post by @Cougrrcj. I thought you expressed yourself well and no apology for your writing needed. I was once advised about presentations, don’t apologize; it can be distracting and evidential, and may not even be necessary.

I write many professional reports with significant medical and/or legal consequences, and I spend a lot of time polishing others writing. I read academic journals with precisely styled citations, and even add some formal citations to my reports. Indeed there is an citation service that counts the times that an article is cited as evidence of its importance.

Frankly though, on Bike Forums I really don’t expect such academic rigor, and I read it for the prima facie content.

However within the world of Bike Forums IMO a unique feature is the use of quote boxes (especially as citations) to link to other posts.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I have been an avid cyclist, as a lifestyle since about 1972…I happened serendipitously on Bike Forums in 2008, and it was frankly incredible to find a community that shared so many concerns I had kept to myself as a lone cyclist.

This enthusiasm has definitely increased my enjoyment of cycling. As far as improving it, what I have gotten directly from BF [include]:...the opportunity to post and literally "journal" my thoughts and activities about cycling and lifestyle (even if nobody else reads them), but which I wouldn't write down otherwise
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston
(From a now-closed thread) I think that the use of quote boxes, which I have not seen elsewhere is a remarkable way to graphically diagram a dialogue. …..:
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
…So with my experiences in cycling, and my frequent posting over the years, if I have replied on a recurrent topic, written to my satisfaction, I’ll just quote it..

A further challenge then becomes finding the post
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
So when I nest quotes, I feel I’m emulating a conversation…”He said," then “You said," then “I said, and now I’m saying…”

I leave my quotes as links to identify the author, and if anyone is interested in reading further, or verifying those quotes, they can easily be followed right from the post[and tells the reader that his topic has been previously considered in the past].

I use ellipses,"..." to eliminate as much as possible, and still leave the context of the quote comprehensible; and I bold key words and phrases to emphasize the core content of the discussion.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Thanks for reading my [different post in the past], and it’s good to know that quoting a subscriber elicits a response.

By nesting quote boxes, I indicate to the quoted subscriber(s) that I have read the post(s), reflected on the content, and extracted meaningful point(s), that I worked into a quote chain.

The quote chain allows me to quote a few subscribers on one topic in one post. As my signature line reads: "I use nested, sequential quotes (to be read in that order) to improvise an imaginary conversation. Anything outside a quote box is my contribution to the current 'conversation. "
My signature line has since been changed, to liken my nested quotes to a "panel discussion on a topic, with me as moderator and a participant, each of us speaking in turn."

FWIW

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 12-22-19 at 01:31 PM.
Jim from Boston is offline  
Old 12-22-19, 10:45 AM
  #23  
Jim from Boston
Senior Member
 
Jim from Boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 7,370
Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 797 Post(s)
Liked 202 Times in 159 Posts
˄˄˄˄

Furthermore IMO, a quotation of a subscriber, even if I disagree is a more complimentary kudo, than just a LIKE.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
…By nesting quote boxes, I indicate to the quoted subscriber(s) that I have read the post(s), reflected on the content, and extracted meaningful point(s), that I worked into a quote chain
Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
At last I'm enshrined in a Jim from Boston quote chain, feels like the big time! Thank you.
As opposed to:
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I've LIKED about [187] posts since the feature was introduced. Sometimes I follow with a reply explaining my commendation..

If I LIKE a post because it is witty, I assume the writer knows I got the joke. e.g.
Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
+1. I didn't see anyone during this 25 mile MUP ride that started pre-dawn. I did, however, see a giant porcupine. He wasn't on a leash and didn't wave.
Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
If I'm on a MUP before 8 a.m. on the weekends pretty much anywhere, there's sparse traffic on it. Before 7 a.m., just a very few joggers and cyclists, and virtually no one dawdling.

Had a porcupine and a couple of deer encounters on a MUP last fall. All quite pleasant, but they did seem confused when I told them I'd be passing on the left.

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 12-22-19 at 11:01 AM.
Jim from Boston is offline  
Old 12-22-19, 07:02 PM
  #24  
Cougrrcj 
Over forty victim of Fate
 
Cougrrcj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 3,329

Bikes: A few...

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 409 Post(s)
Liked 118 Times in 83 Posts
Hey now... I'm a Luddite. As in the Joe Walsh song states - 'I'm an analog man in a digital world'.

Hey, only got a 'smart phone' three years ago because my 85+-year old mother out in Phoenix didn't have internet access or a printer to print a boarding pass. All of this multi-quote stuff is waaaay above my head.
__________________
'75 Fuji S-10S bought new, 52k+ miles and still going!
'84 Univega Gran Tourismo
'84 Univega Viva Sport
'86 Miyata 710
'90 Schwinn Woodlands
Unknown brand MTB of questionable lineage aka 'Mutt Trail Bike'
Plus or minus a few others from time-to-time

Cougrrcj is offline  
Old 12-24-19, 07:10 AM
  #25  
ironwood
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Boston area
Posts: 1,903

Bikes: 1984 Bridgestone 400 1985Univega nouevo sport 650b conversion 1993b'stone RBT 1985 Schwinn Tempo

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 472 Post(s)
Liked 68 Times in 46 Posts
The story of Dr; Graves is interesting. He was one of the few cycling advocates during the dark ages of american cycling. Another advocate, on the East Coast, was also medical doctor, Paul Dudley White, one the leading American cardiologists of the fifties; They knew something that most Americans of the time didn't. Sadly, there are a lot of our fellow citizens who still haven't got the message.
ironwood is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.