Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fifty Plus (50+)
Reload this Page >

How to return to cycling after a 15 year break?

Notices
Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

How to return to cycling after a 15 year break?

Old 04-26-20, 08:13 AM
  #1  
elae
Member
Thread Starter
 
elae's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Bluffton, SC
Posts: 26

Bikes: Litespeed - Arenberg | Specialized Mountain Bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 11 Posts
How to return to cycling after a 15 year break?

Hi there,

I am 51 y/o and have been off the bike for almost 15 years now due to several life changes ... had a baby at 39 ... took a desk job these last 8 years! on and on :-) I know ... no excuses, right?!

Yet, here I am, about 30 pounds heavier than I need to be and missing my Lightspeed!

Back in the day, I rode 3-4 days a week, at least 20 miles each time. I'd love to get back to that schedule.

I recently had my bike tuned up at our local bike shop and jumped on the bike to take a ride. I barely made it 2 miles and I was done!

So,
I have a few questions for this group:
- What have you done to get back in shape?
- I'm considering buying a bike trainer .... which one do you suggest for someone in my condition?
- Is this the forum to connect to for accountability support? If not, please suggest some other groups as well.

Thanks so much!
elae
elae is offline  
Likes For elae:
Old 04-26-20, 08:17 AM
  #2  
wthensler 
Senior Member
 
wthensler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Gatorland and BlueRidge heaven
Posts: 612

Bikes: 2012 Giant Defy 0, 2012 Trek Domane 6.2 P1, Bianchi Infinito CV disc Di2

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 163 Post(s)
Liked 452 Times in 127 Posts
No, tons of excuses. I don’t know many riders that have never taken a hiatus.

My only advise, start slow, get a bike that fits for the type of riding you will be doing, and set a budget to ride something you will want to.

Set aside the time, hook up with others or join a group ride.
__________________
Ride hard and ride on......
wthensler is offline  
Likes For wthensler:
Old 04-26-20, 08:48 AM
  #3  
Speedway2
Senior Member
 
Speedway2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Thornhill, Canada
Posts: 333

Bikes: Specialized Langster, Giant OCR, Marin Muirwoods, Felt Speedway2. Norco Indie3. VROD:)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 104 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 114 Times in 86 Posts
elae....maybe try another "style" of bike(for now). Perhaps a cruiser or hybrid to fit your new normal. You may find these bikes more comfortable=more riding time!
Speedway2 is offline  
Likes For Speedway2:
Old 04-26-20, 08:57 AM
  #4  
berner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bristol, R. I.
Posts: 4,174

Bikes: Specialized Secteur, old Peugeot

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 583 Post(s)
Liked 364 Times in 231 Posts
I began cycling at about age 70 and slowly, very slowly worked up to the point that a 50 mile ride was a typical distance for long rides. the rest of the time I rode 5-15 miles at a a time for errands around town, groceries, library, post office. This all added up to 100 or 120 miles per week. The trick was to use the bike often. I also began watching diet and eating more plant based foods. Don't make it a chore. Keep it fun.
berner is offline  
Likes For berner:
Old 04-26-20, 09:02 AM
  #5  
elae
Member
Thread Starter
 
elae's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Bluffton, SC
Posts: 26

Bikes: Litespeed - Arenberg | Specialized Mountain Bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by Speedway2 View Post
elae....maybe try another "style" of bike(for now). Perhaps a cruiser or hybrid to fit your new normal. You may find these bikes more comfortable=more riding time!
Great idea, I still have my old mountain bike .... so I will cruise around on that for starters!
Thank you !
elae is offline  
Likes For elae:
Old 04-26-20, 09:16 AM
  #6  
Riveting
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 629

Bikes: '13 Trek Madone 2.3, '13 Diamondback Hybrid Commuter, '17 Spec Roubaix Di2, '17 Spec Camber 29'er

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 239 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 60 Posts
Don't find time to ride. Make time.
Riveting is offline  
Likes For Riveting:
Old 04-26-20, 09:17 AM
  #7  
elae
Member
Thread Starter
 
elae's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Bluffton, SC
Posts: 26

Bikes: Litespeed - Arenberg | Specialized Mountain Bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 11 Posts
Thanks to everyone for the quick reply. Such great advice. I thought of also buying a trainer to work on my fitness level after work. Has anyone done that before? And what type of trainer did you purchase?
elae is offline  
Old 04-26-20, 09:21 AM
  #8  
gil_00000
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: North East Ohio
Posts: 53

Bikes: 1977 Trek Tx700, 1978 Trek 510, 1969 Raleigh Competition, 1985 Univega Viva Sport, 1991 Bridgestone RB-1, 1986 Schwinn Voyageur, 1987 Bianchi Limited, 1986 Trek 400 Elance, 2019 Surly Karate Monkey

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Liked 18 Times in 14 Posts
I second that! I've taken a break when I moved recently. The routes aren't as great, the roads suck, life gets in the way, etc. No worries!

I would take it easy as well. Even just taking the winter off I notice I'm not as strong as the fall. Going slow is great. Just ride, look around, enjoy the scenery. I think just simply riding is a big step towards your goal of riding more regularly. No matter the length or intensity, riding is riding. Every time you ride you're riding more than before. Take it easy and enjoy.

I can't offer specific suggestions for a bike thats good for someone in their 50s but I can say over my time as riding, I'm 33, I ride differently than when I started. You could look into relaxing the geometry of your current bike. That may be a cheaper option than getting a new / new to you bike. If you can shorten the stem and maybe add some spacers to raise you up a touch.

A new saddle could be a good option too. Saddles are uber personal decisions. Finding something that works and doesn't cause pain is paramount to enjoying a ride.

Speaking of saddles, you might address the other contact points. The bars/bar tape, and pedals/shoes.

I've switched different styles of handlebars over the years and had various amounts of success. I've found what works for me. No matter what bars I use, I always use Lizard Skin bar tape. I LOVE IT! It comes in a few different thicknesses. It comes in fun colors too if that matters to you. The compound feels really sticky, (not in a bad way) so much grip that even in the wet my hands don't slide right off. I swear by Lizard Skin. I don't like the price though. Its not cheap 40 or so for a pair of bars. You can remove the tape and re-apply it. I've gotten multiple uses out of one set. Or, I've changed out the brake levers with the same tape on the same bars.

You might find platform pedals are more your style at this point. Good thing about platform they're a dime a dozen. Having platforms lets you adjust your feet to a comfortable position. I have platforms and clipless. I make sure to pay attention to the Q-factor when switching between bikes. I have road and mountain so the Q-factor can be very different. The Q-factor is the measurement between your feet compared to the frame. My knees don't like changes with the q-factor bike to bike or after an upgrade.

Riding with other people can be fun too. I've liked having bike buddies over the years. I probably would ride more now If I had one close by.

What ever you do, enjoy it. I can't say that enough. There are a lot of people who are unbelievably stuffy about components, kit, speed, number of gears, frame material, Strava etc. Just ride and have fun. Bikes are ******g awesome. I ride an early 70's raleigh record fixed gear I converted into a commuter. Its not flashy, the saddle or saddle bag or the rack are worth more individually, than the rest of it. Its a rusty, chipped paint, low quality frame to begin with but it rides superbly. I LOVE it!
gil_00000 is offline  
Likes For gil_00000:
Old 04-26-20, 09:32 AM
  #9  
big john
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 13,942
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1226 Post(s)
Liked 781 Times in 475 Posts
I have a Blackburn trainer, It's cheap and dumb, just a magnetic resistance unit. I used it years ago and put it in front of the TV with a fan to cool me off. It's pretty boring. Now they have smart trainers and you can Zwift and race against riders all over the world.

I'm 65 and have had back issues yet I still ride a stiff racing type road bike and try to ride 4 times per week, sometimes on a mtb. Rest days are important if you are pushing it. When I started in my 30s I could barely do 5 miles. I kept at it until 5 miles was easy and started doing 10.
big john is offline  
Likes For big john:
Old 04-26-20, 09:40 AM
  #10  
delbiker1 
Mother Nature's Son
 
delbiker1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Sussex County, Delaware
Posts: 1,477

Bikes: Early 90's Ochsner road, 2006 Schwinn SS DBX, 2014 Orbea Avant MD30, 2004 Airborne Zeppelin TI, 2003 Lemond Poprad, 1989? Fuji Ace, 2001 Lemond Tourmalet, 2014? Soma Smoothie

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 406 Post(s)
Liked 305 Times in 197 Posts
You have to make the commitment. For some people, keeping track of mileage, and or time, of rides helps to keep the motivation. Having to write it on a calendar,post on spreadsheet, or whatever storage you use, is a mental reminder of what you are trying to do. Seeing those posts and the improvement in actual performance is a self satisfaction builder and a measurement of what you have accomplished so far. Seeing the improvement helps to imagine where you can go. For some people, riding with others is a big factor in sticking with it.
delbiker1 is offline  
Likes For delbiker1:
Old 04-26-20, 09:46 AM
  #11  
elae
Member
Thread Starter
 
elae's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Bluffton, SC
Posts: 26

Bikes: Litespeed - Arenberg | Specialized Mountain Bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 11 Posts
-reply to all

Wow! So grateful for all the quick reply today. What a great community this is! THANK YOU!

I want to try and utilize my current bikes. I have a titanium lightspeed that at the time when I bought it between frame, components and gear cost me well into the 4000s. I have a nice Specialized mountain bike as well. Both of those bikes were fit to me. My mountain bike has regular flat petals and my road bike has clipless.

I love the feedback I received about just getting on the mountain bike for now. And building a fitness that way. In the meantime, Id love to use a trainer with my road bike so that I can build up my fitness level here at the house before getting out on the road again.

thank you for the feedback Re: the trainer.

I read an article today that suggests buying a rear bike wheel just for use on the trainer. Id hate to mess up the nice rear wheel that is on my Lightspeed.

any thoughts on a trainer that doesnt mess up your rear wheel and is under $500!!!
elae is offline  
Old 04-26-20, 10:04 AM
  #12  
MRT2
Senior Member
 
MRT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 6,113

Bikes: 2012 Salsa Casseroll, 2009 Kona Blast

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 911 Post(s)
Liked 101 Times in 73 Posts
Originally Posted by elae View Post
Wow! So grateful for all the quick reply today. What a great community this is! THANK YOU!

I want to try and utilize my current bikes. I have a titanium lightspeed that at the time when I bought it between frame, components and gear cost me well into the 4000s. I have a nice Specialized mountain bike as well. Both of those bikes were fit to me. My mountain bike has regular flat petals and my road bike has clipless.

I love the feedback I received about just getting on the mountain bike for now. And building a fitness that way. In the meantime, Id love to use a trainer with my road bike so that I can build up my fitness level here at the house before getting out on the road again.

thank you for the feedback Re: the trainer.

I read an article today that suggests buying a rear bike wheel just for use on the trainer. Id hate to mess up the nice rear wheel that is on my Lightspeed.

any thoughts on a trainer that doesnt mess up your rear wheel and is under $500!!!
Is there any reason you can't just get out and ride your Lightspeed? Give it a few weeks and I am sure you will be up to 10, miles. And in a couple of months, you will be up to 25, 30 or even 35 mile rides.
MRT2 is offline  
Old 04-26-20, 10:07 AM
  #13  
Iride01
Senior Member
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 3,855

Bikes: '20 Tarmac Disc Comp '91 Schwinn Paramount '78 Raleigh Competition GS

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1448 Post(s)
Liked 389 Times in 299 Posts
You just need to ride. Add more time/miles as you get used to it. No other expense needed but time. Trainer might get you there quicker, but I suspect many trainers wind up being very low mileage items taking up space just like treadmills and stationary bikes.
Iride01 is offline  
Likes For Iride01:
Old 04-26-20, 10:24 AM
  #14  
freeranger
Senior Member
 
freeranger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 1,683

Bikes: 06 Lemond Reno, 98 GT Timberline mtn.bike

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 148 Post(s)
Liked 198 Times in 135 Posts
Do you have a friend (or maybe your husband) that can ride with you, and knows the situation? I ask, as a friend of mine was not much for distance, and was worried about riding with a group I occasionally ride with. So we went on a "casually" paced ride, stopped when we felt like it, took "water breaks" (or sports drink) every so often. Had him ignore his cyclometer until the end of the ride, which ended up being 27 miles--said he had no idea we had ridden as far or as long a time as we had. So, take it easy, find someone to ride with (that isn't going to push you further than your comfort zone), have a good time, you might find you can ride further than you think, or at the least, you'll be building up to it. Make enjoyment the goal at first-not speed or distance, which will come along with more rides..

Last edited by freeranger; 04-26-20 at 01:46 PM.
freeranger is offline  
Likes For freeranger:
Old 04-26-20, 10:36 AM
  #15  
BKE
Senior Member
 
BKE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 150
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Are there circumstances that keep you from getting out on the bike, why do you feel the need for a trainer?
BKE is offline  
Old 04-26-20, 10:46 AM
  #16  
Wileyrat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Tucson Az
Posts: 1,551

Bikes: 2015 Ridley Fenix, 1983 Team Fuji, 2019 Marin Nail Trail 6, and a few dust collectors

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 300 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 80 Posts
I've used my old 90 Trek 850 rigid frame mtn bike to ride myself back into road bike shape a couple of times now.

Maybe that's the reason I can't seem to part with it.
Wileyrat is offline  
Likes For Wileyrat:
Old 04-26-20, 11:20 AM
  #17  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 16,397

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 101 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2402 Post(s)
Liked 476 Times in 351 Posts
I did exactly the same thing at 50. IMO, do not ride the MTB. Ride your road bike! Just ride it. I started by trying to get up the 500' hill to a nearby shopping mall, not that I wanted to shop, just a hill with low traffic roads. When I could get up that hill, I simply rode away from home until I was tired, then rode back, mostly avoiding hills, just getting saddle time. When I got up to 60 miles on a weekend ride, I started riding hills, see hill, ride up it.

I bought a set of resistance rollers early in my come-back. I rode them in a doorway my first year, though next to a wall works well, too. They're the best indoor training tool. Just throw your road bike on them and go.
https://www.sportcrafters.com/produc...ve-pro-rollers
More than $500, but they'll last you the rest of your life. No tire wear, no bike damage. They'll fix your bike handling and spin right up. Not as hard to ride as rumored.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Likes For Carbonfiberboy:
Old 04-26-20, 11:31 AM
  #18  
dagray 
Senior Member
 
dagray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Boardman, Oregon, USA
Posts: 1,705

Bikes: Orbea Orca,Raleigh Talus 29er, Centurion Le Mans 12 speed

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 158 Post(s)
Liked 69 Times in 34 Posts
Get a bike fit with the bike you own. Change the stem if necessary to sit you more upright (might cost $100.00 if you buy a really nice stem, mine cost $49.00). Ride that two miles three days a week for a week. Next week go 2.5 or three miles, then go five miles.

I started in 2014 after being off the bike for almost 25 years and could only go 0.75 miles before I was needing a 30 minute break to ride back home and be exhausted the rest of the day to within a year and a half riding the 50 mile route of a Tour de Cure.

YOU CAN DO THIS
__________________
If you see an old fat guy levitating through town with his legs pumping furiously... well don't worry there is a bicycle underneath me.
dagray is offline  
Likes For dagray:
Old 04-26-20, 12:24 PM
  #19  
BlazingPedals
Senior Member
 
BlazingPedals's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middle of da Mitten
Posts: 11,523

Bikes: Trek 7500, RANS V-Rex, Optima Baron, Velokraft NoCom, M-5 Carbon Highracer, Catrike Speed

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1158 Post(s)
Liked 233 Times in 164 Posts
My advice is, just ride! If a saddle or stem doesn't feel right because your body has changed with time, then it can be replaced. I essentially start from scratch every spring. This year has been especially hard, since I was just short of bedrest for about 2 months. My first ride this spring was 9 miles at 12 mph. Yesterday's was 27 miles at 18 mph, so getting there.You can do it too if you just stick with it.
BlazingPedals is offline  
Likes For BlazingPedals:
Old 04-26-20, 12:25 PM
  #20  
HLaudio
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Bradenton, FL
Posts: 30

Bikes: Pure Cycles SS 48:16. w/ some mods

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Hey elae! I was off the bike for 35yrs! Got back on May2016! Rode a cheap cruiser type; crashed it! Broke collarbone. 6 months later back in the saddle. Bought a Pure Cycles single speed and been riding it for the past 2 years. Starting weight was 265lbs now I’m at 175lbs. Best thing I’ve ever done. I had to ride every day weather permitting. Started low miles, 5 miles round trip. Worked upto 20 miles round trip. I ride strictly for exercise. Crazy thing is it’s the only exercise I like! My advice to you...get on the bike and ride. It’s great outside!
be safe,
H
HLaudio is offline  
Likes For HLaudio:
Old 04-26-20, 12:31 PM
  #21  
elae
Member
Thread Starter
 
elae's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Bluffton, SC
Posts: 26

Bikes: Litespeed - Arenberg | Specialized Mountain Bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by BKE View Post
Are there circumstances that keep you from getting out on the bike, why do you feel the need for a trainer?
My work schedule is very heavy right now. And, we live in an area that doesn't have a lot of safe bike routes near my home... I'll need to drive somewhere, park and ride, etc. So a trainer will help me increase my fitness level whist getting on the bike in the early morning at home, maybe set up in my office at work, or at home after work.
elae is offline  
Old 04-26-20, 12:39 PM
  #22  
caloso
Senior Member
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Posts: 39,040

Bikes: Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper

Mentioned: 62 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2247 Post(s)
Liked 951 Times in 496 Posts
I agree with the others that you should ride the bike you have. Once the pandemic is over, spend a few bucks on a bike fit. In the meantime, just ride as much as you are able.

As for a trainer, I have a Kinetic Road Machine. Very solid, not crazy expensive, and an easy way to get on Zwift or Trainer Road.
caloso is offline  
Likes For caloso:
Old 04-26-20, 12:39 PM
  #23  
elae
Member
Thread Starter
 
elae's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Bluffton, SC
Posts: 26

Bikes: Litespeed - Arenberg | Specialized Mountain Bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by big john View Post
I have a Blackburn trainer, It's cheap and dumb, just a magnetic resistance unit. I used it years ago and put it in front of the TV with a fan to cool me off. It's pretty boring. Now they have smart trainers and you can Zwift and race against riders all over the world.

I'm 65 and have had back issues yet I still ride a stiff racing type road bike and try to ride 4 times per week, sometimes on a mtb. Rest days are important if you are pushing it. When I started in my 30s I could barely do 5 miles. I kept at it until 5 miles was easy and started doing 10.
Thanks so much.I'll check this out.
elae is offline  
Old 04-26-20, 12:43 PM
  #24  
elae
Member
Thread Starter
 
elae's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Bluffton, SC
Posts: 26

Bikes: Litespeed - Arenberg | Specialized Mountain Bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 11 Posts
Great advice... I'll check this out at my local bike shop. Thanks!
elae is offline  
Old 04-26-20, 12:52 PM
  #25  
elae
Member
Thread Starter
 
elae's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Bluffton, SC
Posts: 26

Bikes: Litespeed - Arenberg | Specialized Mountain Bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by freeranger View Post
Do you have a friend (or maybe your wife) that can ride with you, and knows the situation? I ask, as a friend of mine was not much for distance, and was worried about riding with a group I occasionally ride with. So we went on a "casually" paced ride, stopped when we felt like it, took "water breaks" (or sports drink) every so often. Had him ignore his cyclometer until the end of the ride, which ended up being 27 miles--said he had no idea we had ridden as far or as long a time as we had. So, take it easy, find someone to ride with (that isn't going to push you further than your comfort zone), have a good time, you might find you can ride further than you think, or at the least, you'll be building up to it. Make enjoyment the goal at first-not speed or distance, which will come along with more rides..
My husband plans to buy a bike and ride with me. We've been married for 15 years and he has never been a cyclist. Truly a newbie. He wants to start with a mountain bike. So, I'm sorta on my own with my road bike. I look forward to riding with him in a more casual setting. But, I'd love to dive back into the thrill I used to get whilst riding my road bike.
elae is offline  
Likes For elae:

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.