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Why does the Mind forget Pain and Danger so quickly?

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Why does the Mind forget Pain and Danger so quickly?

Old 02-25-21, 07:48 PM
  #51  
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I think I confused some people. I don't think we can forget painful events that are traumatic. Things like a serious and a painful injury, losing a loved one or being stranded in a jungle.
However we do seem to forget things that cause non traumatic pain that we do daily.
Why do we climb the same hill today that we had a terrible time with yesterday ? Remember, near the crest, you had to stand and pedal, and the last fifty yards, you trained yourself not to look up, because it seemed like a mile? And how your legs felt like wood and your lungs felt like they were on fire? And you sweared you would never try it again!
I think we do it because ...I don't know..
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Old 02-25-21, 08:47 PM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by big john
As someone with an extensive dental history, I disagree. When we go in for a root canal, for example, we know it's going to be uncomfortable. We do it anyway because of the benefit to us.

Women don't "forget" the pain of childbirth. They are willing to endure it because they want another child. They willingly trade the pain for the benefit
.
When we get injured doing something we love, like bicycling, the memory of the pain and injury will hopefully teach us to be more careful.
I can't speak for anyone else but some of my injuries have left vivid images of pain in my brain. I smashed my big toe on a rock while motorcycling in the desert. I didn't forget that pain and I never will but you can bet I think about it when my feet get near rocks when I'm on my mtb.
Suppress does not mean to absolutely forget. In the context used, it means to put aside and as you indicated, understand that it is or may be necessary. One doesn't forget serious pain, but recognizes that it is survivable and while hopefully avoidable, it can be overcome. If it were otherwise, I'd never ride up a big hill again. 😁

I've torn my Achilles tendon, (I thought I had been shot in the calf when it happened and I actually looked to see if my calf was bleeding), and I remember immediately going down and eventually crawling to a light pole for assistance in getting to my feet. I'LL NEVER FORGET THAT MOMENT OR THE MONTHS OF THERAPY. Never-the-less, while the memory remains, it doesn't stop me now from full activity. I've suppressed, but not forgotten. (I've also had two root canals and a bike crash suffering three fractured ribs and a concussion...)

To wit...If you really want to test yourself and get in shape, skip cycling or extreme forms of exercise...try keeping up with 6 and 9 year old grandchildren for an afternoon in a park . If I dwelled on potential pain, I'd just be watching (and always turning around at the base of hills).

Be well.

Last edited by MAK; 02-25-21 at 09:08 PM.
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Old 02-25-21, 09:01 PM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by 5 mph
I think I confused some people. I don't think we can forget painful events that are traumatic. Things like a serious and a painful injury, losing a loved one or being stranded in a jungle.
However we do seem to forget things that cause non traumatic pain that we do daily.
Why do we climb the same hill today that we had a terrible time with yesterday ? Remember, near the crest, you had to stand and pedal, and the last fifty yards, you trained yourself not to look up, because it seemed like a mile? And how your legs felt like wood and your lungs felt like they were on fire? And you sweared you would never try it again!
I think we do it because ...I don't know..
You did use the word "forget" a few times in your original post, but I did understand what you meant and the ultimate question(s) you posed. If I may, I think you were asking...When we get knocked down, why do we keep getting up? When we suffer hardships, why do we persevere?

Be well.
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Old 02-25-21, 09:26 PM
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Originally Posted by MAK
Suppress does not mean to absolutely forget. In the context used, it means to put aside and as you indicated, understand that it is or may be necessary. One doesn't forget serious pain, but recognizes that it is survivable and while hopefully avoidable, it can be overcome. If it were otherwise, I'd never ride up a big hill again. 😁

I've torn my Achilles tendon, (I thought I had been shot in the calf when it happened and I actually looked to see if my calf was bleeding), and I remember immediately going down and eventually crawling to a light pole for assistance in getting to my feet. I'LL NEVER FORGET THAT MOMENT OR THE MONTHS OF THERAPY. Never-the-less, while the memory remains, it doesn't stop me now from full activity. I've suppressed, but not forgotten. (I've also had two root canals and a bike crash suffering three fractured ribs and a concussion...)

To wit...If you really want to test yourself and get in shape, skip cycling or extreme forms of exercise...try keeping up with 6 and 9 year old grandchildren for an afternoon in a park . If I dwelled on potential pain, I'd just be watching (and always turning around at the base of hills).

Be well.
I agree with much of what you say, except for the suppressing part. That was kinda my point, I don't find it necessary to forget or suppress the act of cycling. I like climbing, though I am too heavy to be great at it. Whatever discomfort there is about a tough climb is part of the experience. If I really didn't like it I wouldn't do it.

I did around 2000 club rides between the years 2000 and 2020, many of them hammerfests where I could barely hang on or got dropped. This is more painful than a casual climbing ride. It got to the point where I didn't enjoy it anymore and when covid hit, that was the end of it. I might not ever do those rides again, because I remember the struggling and I might have aged out.

Pain from injury is a different story. If I knew I was going to smash my toe every time I rode my motorcycle, I would have quit doing it long before I did.
Cycling can cause injury. We have to weigh the risk versus reward when we do it.

Last edited by big john; 02-25-21 at 09:33 PM.
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Old 02-26-21, 10:29 PM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by big john
I agree with much of what you say, except for the suppressing part. That was kinda my point, I don't find it necessary to forget or suppress the act of cycling. I like climbing, though I am too heavy to be great at it. Whatever discomfort there is about a tough climb is part of the experience. If I really didn't like it I wouldn't do it.

I did around 2000 club rides between the years 2000 and 2020, many of them hammerfests where I could barely hang on or got dropped. This is more painful than a casual climbing ride. It got to the point where I didn't enjoy it anymore and when covid hit, that was the end of it. I might not ever do those rides again, because I remember the struggling and I might have aged out.

Pain from injury is a different story. If I knew I was going to smash my toe every time I rode my motorcycle, I would have quit doing it long before I did.
Cycling can cause injury. We have to weigh the risk versus reward when we do it.
Where did I say that the act of cycling should be suppressed or forgotten? At best, I mentioned cycling vs. playing with grandchildren as hyperbole with regard to getting over the pain of the Achilles. I get the impression that this discussion will continue ad nauseum and you need to have the last word so I'm stopping. If I'm right and you must 'win', so be it and I simply won't bother to reply. Just please don't misquote or misinterpreted me again.

Be well.
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