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-   -   Review the route before you ride? (https://www.bikeforums.net/fifty-plus-50/1225910-review-route-before-you-ride.html)

Barrettscv 03-18-21 07:55 PM

I've enjoyed some exotic locations and it's possible to scout out any destination with tools like Map-my-ride and Google Earth. So yes, I plan my rides.


https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...1456126ac.jpeg

gthomson 03-19-21 06:56 AM


Originally Posted by Barrettscv (Post 21974366)
I've enjoyed some exotic locations and it's possible to scout out any destination with tools like Map-my-ride and Google Earth. So yes, I plan my rides.


https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...1456126ac.jpeg

Nice view and nice bike!!

Barrettscv 03-19-21 10:16 AM


Originally Posted by gthomson (Post 21974723)
Nice view and nice bike!!

I've used Map-my-Ride to help find routes is rural Italy, with excellent results;

: http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/409214538

http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/l...psdf0602c7.jpg

Machka 03-26-21 01:58 AM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 21969233)
It's hard to imagine an 18% grade on any event ride without some advance notice, especially a 20 mile ride. This was a road ride?


Try riding in Tasmania! It's hard to avoid the steep hills here.

Machka 03-26-21 02:05 AM

Prior to moving to Tasmania, I used to just go!
Since moving to Tasmania, I check the routes because it is way too easy to end up on some immense climb and/or narrow gravel road.
Since Rowan's accident, we prefer quiet roads, relatively flat roads, and usually sealed or packed/smooth gravel.

ooga-booga 03-26-21 02:18 AM

usually a little bit, yes, for the highlights and such, but prefer to keep a little mystery involved. often, more concerned with support than route climbing difficulties.

ooga-booga 03-26-21 02:21 AM


Originally Posted by Tomm Willians (Post 21974016)
My wife and I decided to take a drive to check out a posted ride not too far away from our home. Thankfully we did this before riding as it was one of the most flipping dangerous routes Iíve ever seen. We did encounter a few cyclists who clearly didnít see it that way but to each their own.
Itís not always possible to drive them out but we try to if we can.

always best if you have the time and ability. not always possible but totally agree about 100% unfamiliar routes.

big john 03-26-21 09:26 AM


Originally Posted by Machka (Post 21985608)
Try riding in Tasmania! It's hard to avoid the steep hills here.

I'm sure there are steep hills there, but would a charity ride send riders up them on a 20 mile event? The people signing up for a 20 mile option aren't likely to be interested in steep climbs, that was my point.

Machka 03-27-21 01:15 AM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 21985989)
I'm sure there are steep hills there, but would a charity ride send riders up them on a 20 mile event? The people signing up for a 20 mile option aren't likely to be interested in steep climbs, that was my point.

It would be hard to find a flat 20 miles here. I know because I'm trying to find flat 20 mile routes! I pour over maps. Rowan has difficulty climbing hills and we'd like to ride flat routes but ...

John E 03-27-21 07:22 AM

I concur with the comments about choosing routes based on traffic safety and road design, including speed limits, bike lanes, and intersection hazards, such as right side merges and free right turns (in countries in which we drive on the right -- Machcka and Rowan need to reverse this for Tasmania :) ).

Hills are not a particular concern for me, because I lived in west Los Angeles when I took up serious cycling as a UCLA student, and most of my favorite rides were in the hills of Bel Air, Brentwood, Pacific Palisades, and Malibu.

big john 03-27-21 07:52 AM


Originally Posted by John E (Post 21987220)
I concur with the comments about choosing routes based on traffic safety and road design, including speed limits, bike lanes, and intersection hazards, such as right side merges and free right turns (in countries in which we drive on the right -- Machcka and Rowan need to reverse this for Tasmania :) ).

Hills are not a particular concern for me, because I lived in west Los Angeles when I took up serious cycling as a UCLA student, and most of my favorite rides were in the hills of Bel Air, Brentwood, Pacific Palisades, and Malibu.

A lot of my favorite rides are in the Santa Monica mountains. Last Saturday we rode Mulholland from Calabasas to Westlake and down into Westlake Village. The week before we climbed Piuma and descended Stunt road. Great roads.

billridesbikes 03-27-21 10:39 AM


Originally Posted by Bald Paul (Post 21968757)
I have a neighbor who started cycling after knee surgery. He got to where he could comfortably ride around 18 miles locally, then asked me if I would join him on a charity ride sponsored by a nearby cycling club. One of the routes they offered was a short 20 miles. Of course, I agreed.
On the day of the ride we checked in at the registration table and got our route cuesheet. Roads had been pre-marked with colored arrows at the turns for the various routes.
Off we went. 20 miles, most of which included climbing sections with one section at an 18+% grade. (I'll admit, some of those were 'get off and walk the bike to the top' sections.) Needless to say, we ended up totally exhausted, and spent the next day or two resting our knees (I have had knee surgery previously.) We both swore we would never sign up for a group / charity ride again, unless the route was published on something like RidewithGPS to see what kind of terrain we would be tackling.
How do you approach group / charity rides?

NOTE: section in italics edited to clarify for those conceptually challenged

Just a question: The route was either a loop (most probably) or out-n-back. What stopped you from just flipping a U-ie when faced with wall of road and heading back the other way, was the grade at mile 18~19 somehow?

Bald Paul 03-27-21 04:26 PM


Originally Posted by billridesbikes (Post 21987458)
Just a question: The route was either a loop (most probably) or out-n-back. What stopped you from just flipping a U-ie when faced with wall of road and heading back the other way, was the grade at mile 18~19 somehow?

Yes, it was a loop, and of course, the steepest climb was about 2 miles from the end.

John E 03-27-21 07:49 PM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 21987238)
A lot of my favorite rides are in the Santa Monica mountains. Last Saturday we rode Mulholland from Calabasas to Westlake and down into Westlake Village. The week before we climbed Piuma and descended Stunt road. Great roads.

I remember Stunt Road and Mulholland Drive very well. I bought my 1971 Nishiki Competition at Rancho Park Cycles on a Friday night and broke it in the next day by making a loop up through Griffith Park, across Mulholland Dr., and back home to Rancho Park / Cheviot Hills. Before the ride I replaced the wretched OEM padded saddle with my trusty old Ideale tensioned saddle, which prompted my riding buddy to say, "Ah -- all the discomforts of home."

I am still royally pi$$ed that they destroyed the best hill climb of them all, Tuna Canyon, by making it one way downhill.

Other favorites of mine included the Hollywood hills, Franklin Canyon, Nichols Canyon.

big john 03-27-21 08:03 PM


Originally Posted by John E (Post 21988119)
I remember Stunt Road and Mulholland Drive very well. I bought my 1971 Nishiki Competition at Rancho Park Cycles on a Friday night and broke it in the next day by making a loop up through Griffith Park, across Mulholland Dr., and back home to Rancho Park / Cheviot Hills. Before the ride I replaced the wretched OEM padded saddle with my trusty old Ideale tensioned saddle, which prompted my riding buddy to say, "Ah -- all the discomforts of home."

I am still royally pi$$ed that they destroyed the best hill climb of them all, Tuna Canyon, by making it one way downhill.

Other favorites of mine included the Hollywood hills, Franklin Canyon, Nichols Canyon.

Franklin Canyon is one of my favorites in that area. Some steep climbs around there! I also like Sunset Plaza, another twisty climb on quiet roads.

indyfabz 03-27-21 09:19 PM

I always map out my tours in unfamiliar areas on RWGPS and look at Google Street View when available.

epnnf 04-29-21 03:26 PM

I believe you, but its hard to imagine 18%. Some of the roads around here are maybe 10%, for only a few hundred yards. And this is supposed to be a hilly part of the country.
I do not preview routes. I guess its all the same.

Biker395 04-30-21 02:29 PM

If I suspect the ride will be difficult for me, I'd scope it out first. If not, I would just do it (waiting for the cease and desist letter from Nike).

Inusuit 05-09-21 04:37 PM

About 50% of my miles are on gravel country roads. I use Google Earth Pro to evaluate new routes as it gives an elevation profile. I have also driven unknown back roads and new routes. Most routes are relatively remote, so no cafe stops or Google street views.
https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...6aa4aed63a.jpg
In the first 17 miles of today's ride, I met no vehicles and was passed three times. Saw one other bicycle.

njkayaker 05-09-21 05:58 PM


Originally Posted by Bald Paul (Post 21970246)
First, I never said there were 10 climbs. Second, the 18% was the steepest section, not all climbs.
I'll try to word things more concisely in the future.

You said “most of which had climbing sections”. This suggest quite a few climbs. 10? 5? It’s not clear.

An 18% grade on any organized ride would be unusual.

An 18% grade on a organized 20 mile ride is borderline unbelievable. Such a short ride is targeting newer/novice riders.

What’s the website for the ride?

Bald Paul 05-10-21 10:29 AM


Originally Posted by njkayaker (Post 22052167)
An 18% grade on a organized 20 mile ride is borderline unbelievable. Such a short ride is targeting newer/novice riders.

(sigh)
That was precisely the point of my post. Here, let me recap for you - My friend, new to cycling, asked me to join him on the ride, thinking a 20 mile ride would be geared towards newer riders. Had the route been made available beforehand, we would not have participated. Is this such a difficult concept to read and comprehend?

p.s.: here's another example of a local ride elevation chart from RWGPS. No, I didn't sign up for this one.
https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...9f358adb60.jpg

njkayaker 05-10-21 01:01 PM


Originally Posted by Bald Paul (Post 22053129)
(sigh)
That was precisely the point of my post. Here, let me recap for you - My friend, new to cycling, asked me to join him on the ride, thinking a 20 mile ride would be geared towards newer riders. Had the route been made available beforehand, we would not have participated. Is this such a difficult concept to read and comprehend?

You aren't providing enough information about the rather unusual situation for people here to evaluate it.


Originally Posted by Bald Paul (Post 22053129)
p.s.: here's another example of a local ride elevation chart from RWGPS. No, I didn't sign up for this one.

???

It doesn't look like a screen shot from RWGPS.

Was this one of the rides at the event?

These events are open to the public. How hard is it to provide a link to the webpage for the event?


Originally Posted by Bald Paul (Post 21968757)
NOTE: section in italics edited to clarify for those conceptually challenged

:rolleyes:

Bald Paul 05-11-21 06:05 AM


Originally Posted by njkayaker (Post 22053420)
You aren't providing enough information about the rather unusual situation for people here to evaluate it.


???

It doesn't look like a screen shot from RWGPS.

Was this one of the rides at the event?

These events are open to the public. How hard is it to provide a link to the webpage for the event?


:rolleyes:

I'm going to humor you one more time before you go on my IGNORE list. (Feel free to do the same to me.)
Here's more information:
The route was a loop. There were left and right turns interspersed with straight sections of road. The surface was asphalt in reasonably good shape. I consumed approximately 21.3 oz of water during the ride. Tires were inflated to approximately 90 PSI. Now, punch all that into your supercomputer to determine if, IN GENERAL, you would prefer being able to preview the route before deciding to ride it.
Look at a route on RWGPS. Click the GRADE tab at the bottom. Expand the area you want to look at in detail. See? It really is a screenshot! No, the grade example posted was a local ride where the route WAS provided on RWGPS, and after looking at it, I decided NOT to attempt it.
It's extremely difficult to provide a link to the webpage for an event that occurred several years ago, and was advertised via a flyer posted in the LBS.

Now, I'm not answering any more questions until my lawyer arrives.

njkayaker 05-11-21 07:11 AM


Originally Posted by Bald Paul (Post 22054359)
I'm going to humor you one more time before you go on my IGNORE list. (Feel free to do the same to me.)
Here's more information:
The route was a loop. There were left and right turns interspersed with straight sections of road. The surface was asphalt in reasonably good shape. I consumed approximately 21.3 oz of water during the ride. Tires were inflated to approximately 90 PSI. Now, punch all that into your supercomputer to determine if, IN GENERAL, you would prefer being able to preview the route before deciding to ride it.
Look at a route on RWGPS. Click the GRADE tab at the bottom. Expand the area you want to look at in detail. See? It really is a screenshot! No, the grade example posted was a local ride where the route WAS provided on RWGPS, and after looking at it, I decided NOT to attempt it.
It's extremely difficult to provide a link to the webpage for an event that occurred several years ago, and was advertised via a flyer posted in the LBS.

Now, I'm not answering any more questions until my lawyer arrives.

???

You are still bothered by this thing that happened years ago?

If you have access to the route, why wouldn't you look at it?

Do you really need to have people to tell you that?


Originally Posted by Bald Paul (Post 22054359)
Here's more information:<list of useless and irrrelevent info>

Useless.


Originally Posted by Bald Paul (Post 22054359)
It's extremely difficult to provide a link to the webpage for an event that occurred several years ago, and was advertised via a flyer posted in the LBS.

It might not be difficult at all. No event name? No organization name? No location?


Originally Posted by Bald Paul (Post 22054359)
Look at a route on RWGPS. Click the GRADE tab at the bottom. Expand the area you want to look at in detail. See?

??? How can I look at a route you haven't provided a link to?


Originally Posted by Bald Paul (Post 22054359)
See? It really is a screenshot!

:rolleyes: It's obviously a screen shot of something.


Originally Posted by Bald Paul (Post 22054359)
No, the grade example posted was a local ride where the route WAS provided on RWGPS, ....

What?? It's a screen of some completely different ride??

unterhausen 05-11-21 07:19 AM

sometimes you can find a ride on Strava or RWGPS even though the organizers didn't post a map. Or ask the organizers if they have the route posted online.

To be perfectly honest, I don't trust organizers not to put me on a drag strip without shoulders, so I'm fairly careful about checking the route ahead of time.


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