Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fifty Plus (50+)
Reload this Page >

want a new bike

Notices
Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

want a new bike

Old 11-15-21, 01:16 PM
  #26  
Senior Member
 
late's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Southern Maine
Posts: 8,867
Mentioned: 128 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11904 Post(s)
Liked 1,365 Times in 1,002 Posts
Originally Posted by big john

I ran "teeny tiny" 23s on everything for 35 years and only switched to 25s recently. I feel a difference but it's not huge. 28s don't really fit on my Seven. I have one road bike that won't fit 25s. I could put 28s on my Gunnar but why?
Here is the Gunnar with 23s on a cold day.

How does the Sport compare to your Seven? I've always wanted to try a Seven, but they are seriously spendy.
late is offline  
Old 11-15-21, 01:46 PM
  #27  
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 24,107
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7503 Post(s)
Liked 7,891 Times in 3,973 Posts
Originally Posted by late
How does the Sport compare to your Seven? I've always wanted to try a Seven, but they are seriously spendy.
I got the Seven used, I couldn't spend the amount for a new one. They are very different bikes, The Gunnar is a more compliant ride, certainly more comfortable on a rough road but it also has a longer wheelbase and more shallow head angle than the Seven.
The Seven climbs better but part of that may be the difference in weight, I think about 3 pounds the way they are built up. People are surprised when I tell them the Seven is a very stiff frame, they expect ti frames to be smooth riding and some are (Moots Vamoots) but not this one. This bike feels a lot like a CAAD5 I had.
I always think I would like a bike that is a cross between these two.
big john is offline  
Likes For big john:
Old 11-15-21, 03:08 PM
  #28  
Senior Member
 
downtube42's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 3,700

Bikes: Trek Domane SL6 Gen 3, Soma Fog Cutter, Focus Mares AL, Detroit Bikes Sparrow FG, Volae Team, Nimbus MUni

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 819 Post(s)
Liked 1,888 Times in 988 Posts
When you press the pedals on a lightweight bike, after riding a heavyweight, it will feel like it just launches. That feeling may just motivate you to push a little harder, which will make you a litter faster in itself, and over time that greater effort will make you stronger. A new lightweight bike can make you faster, even in the flats.

Alternatively, if you show up at the club ride on your Miyata, you might feel compelled to compete with the big boys and their shiny toys. Doing such will make you faster, both on that day and in the long run. Eventually you might discover the thrill of beating the boys and their shiny toys, and you might just be willing to achieve new levels of suffering attempting to crush them.

Pick a path and go all in. It'll work.
downtube42 is offline  
Old 11-15-21, 03:23 PM
  #29  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Valley Forge: Birthplace of Freedom
Posts: 1,280

Bikes: Novara Safari, CAAD9, WABI Classic, WABI Thunder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 356 Post(s)
Liked 444 Times in 233 Posts
I am a big fan of getting your current bike tuned up and replacing the tires. If it has 700c wheels scrounge around for some GP5000s which will transform the ride.

Once you decide if you are going to stick with it a newer road bike will be much "better" than your current bike. With the inflated prices it would be a shame to invest a couple thousand dollars and decide its not for you.

Good luck.
stevel610 is offline  
Likes For stevel610:
Old 11-16-21, 09:20 AM
  #30  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2021
Location: Central Indiana
Posts: 13

Bikes: old Miyata

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 1 Post
Thanks to everyone for all your wisdom-it's been extremely helpful. I'm in no hurry right now. I've had the Miyata since a teen when I did longer distances, and have gotten back into riding over the past 3 years now, steadily increasing my mileage and striving for small increases in speed. I've never been a racer though. It's my only bike. I've also modified my 1980's something Miyata-sorry I don't remember the exact year my parents got it for me. But as I've gotten older, I put larger tires on it (after a spill on gravel off the pavement), changed the seat, and put in an adjustable stem to improve comfort.
I plan to research the leads you've all provided and hopefully start some test drives at the start of the new year. I'm curious how people order a used bike though and negotiate the test drive stage of evaluation? Not sure I'm up for buying a bike without some test drive experience--

Last edited by bikeflo; 11-16-21 at 09:27 AM. Reason: adding stuff
bikeflo is offline  
Old 11-16-21, 09:29 AM
  #31  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2021
Location: Central Indiana
Posts: 13

Bikes: old Miyata

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 1 Post
Like "what do you think this is, a practice life?"-agreed.
bikeflo is offline  
Old 11-16-21, 10:43 AM
  #32  
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 24,107
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7503 Post(s)
Liked 7,891 Times in 3,973 Posts
Originally Posted by bikeflo
I'm curious how people order a used bike though and negotiate the test drive stage of evaluation? Not sure I'm up for buying a bike without some test drive experience--
Some people on the forum swear by used bikes and only buy used bikes. I am not one of them, even though I bought a used road bike last time. I test rode it and it felt awful but I knew I could make it work. I changed the stem, handle bar, seat post, saddle, crankset and cassette to make it work for me. I usually buy frames and assemble them the way I want them. Some of us never test-ride a bike before purchase.

It's tough to buy a used bike if you don't know what you want. Further, if you don't know how to check condition you may get fleeced. And you get no warranty.
Places like The Pro's Closet have used bikes which seem safer than buying from a private party. They are not cheap but people seem to be pretty happy with them, from what I've read.

Ask around your area about a shop with a good reputation for taking care of customers. If you have any friends who ride a lot they may be able to help.
big john is offline  
Likes For big john:
Old 11-16-21, 06:05 PM
  #33  
Senior Member
 
Cougrrcj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 3,891

Bikes: A few...

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 620 Post(s)
Liked 370 Times in 256 Posts
I've said this before, and it bears repeating from time-to-time...

WHEELSET! Pay attention to your old wheelset. Many who think their bike is 'old and sluggish' would be astounded at what happens when you bring an old, neglected wheel up to proper spoke tension. Give it a try! Loose spoke tensions wastes energy -- It almost feels like riding on a flat tire!!


Speaking of tires --- Another factor is tire choice.

When I bought the Miyata 710 while out in Phoenix to keep out there when I was to visit family, it had a 23mm tire on the front, and a flat 25mm on the back. I replaced the rear tire with the only thing I could find at the PHX LBS for under $70 (Yikes!) was a 28mm Vittoria Randonneur II. The ride was unremarkable and sluggish.

Fast-forward a year, and on my next visit out there I brought along new tires and tubes - actually two sets of tires - one 25mm (235g) and another 28mm (265g) of the same tire (Vittoria Rubino Pro Tech III) - and one set of new tubes (95g ea). I chose to run the 28s.
When I was replacing the old with the new, I was amazed at the weight difference. The front had been a wire-bead Vittoria Zaffiro (340g). The front tube was a very heavy puncture resistant tube (230g), and it was made even heavier with a lot of Slime (at least another ~250g). The Randonneur II that I put on the rear the year before was also a heavy tire at 490g. That old front tire/tube combo was so heavy that it actually weighed more (~820g) than both new front/rear tire/tubes put together (720g) ! Replacing the rear was another 3/4 pound of rotating weight eliminated. The old tires themselves were very stiff 33tpi, while the new Rubino Pros were 150tpi (threads per Inch) which allows for a more flexible/supple casing.

The ride afterward was amazing!! It felt like an entirely different bike!

Last edited by Cougrrcj; 11-16-21 at 06:08 PM.
Cougrrcj is offline  
Likes For Cougrrcj:
Old 11-16-21, 08:19 PM
  #34  
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 19,320

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 114 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3783 Post(s)
Liked 1,809 Times in 1,305 Posts
I usually don't buy a used bike I haven't seen or ridden. Simple. So it has to be a bike within easy driving distance. That said, I did exactly that with out used tandem. I had it checked out, packed and shipped by the owner's local bike shop and knew exactly what I was getting. I had to change out both stems and of course saddles and tires. Later, I built new wheels for it. But basically it saved me $3,000. I had to watch want ads for 2 years before it turned up.

Single bikes are much easier, by a couple orders of magnitude, but the principle is the same. Decide what sort of bike you want, know the sizes that your candidate bikes come in, watch and wait.

Post 33 brings up good points. The same as in the automobile world, tires have seen the greatest technological improvement in recent decades. They had dual overhead cam racing engines in the 20's and our bikes look almost identical to a 1920s bike, but our tires are amazingly different. You probably can't put a modern tire on your bike because they're all made for hooked rims on 700c wheels and your tires are probably 27 X 1-1/4..
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 11-16-21, 10:07 PM
  #35  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Oahu, HI
Posts: 1,387

Bikes: 89 Paramount OS 84 Fuji Touring Series III New! 2013 Focus Izalco Ergoride

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 283 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 67 Times in 50 Posts
The beauty of being on this forum, is you might well have the disposable to keep your current bike and get something new. There's lots of neat bikes out there. My criteria are: I don't want to ride what every other guy out there is on, and I want colors I like. I can always fiddle with the components. Been doing that all my life (from back when you could get Nashbar and Performance catalogs with the order forms in the middle so they were easy to remove and mail-in). I really don't think you can go wrong with any of the bikes out there. Mainly, is the geometry difference (for me, the headtube and stack/reach numbers).

scott s.
.
scott967 is offline  
Old 11-25-21, 09:54 AM
  #36  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: SE Wyoming
Posts: 607

Bikes: 1995 Specialized Rockhopper,1989 Specialized Rock Combo, 2013 Specialized Tarmac Elite

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 213 Post(s)
Liked 587 Times in 277 Posts
All of my bikes were purchased used, all locally. Test rode them except the 1987 Diamondback that I bought from a thrift store for $7.50. Figured I could afford the risk on that one.

As others have mentioned, bike fit is probably the most important consideration. Colors or how many other people are riding a similar bike don't matter to me but do to some. If you are spending a substantial sum, it should be exactly what you want. I agree with those who have recommended updating your current ride first.
Inusuit is offline  
Old 11-25-21, 11:11 AM
  #37  
Senior Member
 
downtube42's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 3,700

Bikes: Trek Domane SL6 Gen 3, Soma Fog Cutter, Focus Mares AL, Detroit Bikes Sparrow FG, Volae Team, Nimbus MUni

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 819 Post(s)
Liked 1,888 Times in 988 Posts
​​​​​Fit matters as people have said, but fit is not an end to itself. A bike that's uncomfortable because it doesn't suit your body will not be enjoyable. A bike that doesn't function well will also not be enjoyable. If your body feels good and the bike functions, speed will come with saddle time. The next thing after fit and basic function, whether tires or weight or geometry, is a distant third.

If you get one and two correct, you'll ride. If you ride, you'll eventually come to know what you want in your next bike. On that bike, you can pick all the things. Rinse, repeat.
downtube42 is offline  
Old 11-25-21, 11:19 AM
  #38  
Senior Member
 
downtube42's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 3,700

Bikes: Trek Domane SL6 Gen 3, Soma Fog Cutter, Focus Mares AL, Detroit Bikes Sparrow FG, Volae Team, Nimbus MUni

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 819 Post(s)
Liked 1,888 Times in 988 Posts
Originally Posted by bikeflo
Like "what do you think this is, a practice life?"-agreed.
My 70 y/o friend and mentor asked that of me, when i was waffling about attempting my first 1200k - Paris Brest Paris - in 2011. I went, succeeded, and that opened up my mind to doing audacious things.
downtube42 is offline  
Old 11-30-21, 06:23 PM
  #39  
Senior Member
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 7,055

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 464 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 81 Times in 61 Posts
The "light bike" is the one with the light frameset. That kind of frameset is designed to be fast on descents and ascents. The next thing is the wheelset. Some shops carry certain brands of "already made" wheels and also "custom" wheels that are "pick and choose" components. The hubs, the spokes, the rims.

A rider can ride, side by side with another rider at the same speed. Then at a point, they simultaneously stop the pedaling and allow the bike to coast. The faster bike will seem to surge slightly ahead of the other rider. The difference will be the weight of each rider and the aerodynamic posture of each rider.

There are other factors like the weight of the other components on that frameset. But all things being equal, its the frameset and the wheelset. You want to go fast? Spend the money on those two things.
Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 12-02-21, 06:56 PM
  #40  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Wild Wonderful West Virginia
Posts: 545

Bikes: Gunnar Crosshairs, Surly Karate Monkey, Specialized Fuze, Bianchi Volpe, too many others and a lot of broken frame

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
Liked 70 Times in 21 Posts
I have a Gunnar Crosshairs. Wonderful bike. I plan on getting a Hyper X soon because I want to be able to run wider tires.
wvridgerider is offline  
Old 12-03-21, 06:09 AM
  #41  
Senior Member
 
Tomm Willians's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2020
Location: Nevada County, California
Posts: 769

Bikes: Subject to change at any given moment but currently is...... Colnago Mapei, Colnago C40, Wilier Triestina Carbon, Wilier Triestina Ramato, Follis 472, Peugeot PX60, Razesa, Orbea Terra, Soma Pescadero and 1/2 owner of a Santana tandem.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 317 Post(s)
Liked 761 Times in 253 Posts
The wife and I own a number of bikes but tend to gravitate towards 2-3 of them. What is likely my most useful all-around bike is an Orbea Terra Cyclocross bike. We have a plethora of trails to ride in my area with some being on gravel roads, but I obtained a second wheelset with 32c GP5000ís so the bike doubles as a road bike.
Iíve found that on paved roads that are not exactly ideal, this setup works beautifully. I use 38c Gravel Kings in the dirt pumped up fairly hard and with a Selle Anatomica and a shock stem, itís been my go to bike for two centuries and dozens of shorter rides.
The wife and I are in agreement that if we had to part with all our other bikes (gasp &#128563 we could get by quite well with our gravel bikes and extra wheelsets.
Tomm Willians is offline  
Old 12-15-21, 08:46 PM
  #42  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Elyria OH
Posts: 25

Bikes: Scott Foil, GT Edge titanium, Trek Y bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 5 Posts
I was a cat 1 racer back in the mid 90ís and stopped racing in 97 and hung up the bike for good in maybeí02. The bike was a GT edge titanium with Ultegra. A nice late 90ís racing bike.

I dusted it off and got back to it this year. Right before thanksgiving I bought a lightly used 2017 Scott foil, Ultegra and Reynolds rsix wheels.

At this time in November I wasnít riding as much due to weather and earlier sunset. Plus a bunch of added clothing. I was matching my best times on Strava and even set a few personal bests.

So my opinion is a modern aero bike will improve your speed and a ride times.
mattswabb is offline  
Likes For mattswabb:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.