Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fifty Plus (50+)
Reload this Page >

Heart Rate and Training Zones for Old Farts

Notices
Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

Heart Rate and Training Zones for Old Farts

Old 05-05-22, 06:21 AM
  #26  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 4,083
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2332 Post(s)
Liked 2,097 Times in 1,314 Posts
How one uses HR during training depends largely on the desired training effect.

I am trying to build long distance and endurance, or my aerobic engine so to speak. My primary focus on most all rides is on an effort level where I can still talk, this happens around 115-117 BPM and around 220-230 watts if I am rested. When I do intervals, they are 4-5 minute balls to the wall effort and I can only see the HR later, it is too intense to be fiddling around. That is just how I do it.

Some hearts are like 2 litre Rally Cars and others are like Big Block Chevies or Ford Powerstrokes. They can make the same power, but one motor rev's up to 8000 RPM and the other lugs along at 4000 rpm making the same power. A HRM can help you learn your motor.

That is why comparing HR from one to another rider makes no sense.
GhostRider62 is offline  
Likes For GhostRider62:
Old 05-05-22, 08:19 AM
  #27  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 8,371
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4384 Post(s)
Liked 4,820 Times in 2,978 Posts
Originally Posted by Bearhawker
Just tried the ' "active people" formula, 211 0.64 x Age ' thing and it comes up close to but less than my average.

Maybe I'm weird?
No it's just that the formula is inaccurate for any individual. HR profiles are as individual as shoe sizes where an average size doesn't apply to all individuals. There is just too much variation for a single formula to be useful.
PeteHski is offline  
Likes For PeteHski:
Old 05-05-22, 08:38 AM
  #28  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 8,371
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4384 Post(s)
Liked 4,820 Times in 2,978 Posts
Originally Posted by Biker395
Thanks for the comments. I feel better knowing that others similarly inclined have HRs in the same range.


This is pretty much it. I had someone caution me about exceeding a percentage of my max heart rate, as defined by the calculation. The problem is ... what sense does it make to suggest that my max heart rate is 155, when I regularly ride in the 150-160 range for an hour at a time? I don't think it does.

I'll see a cardiologist anyway for a looksee, but I will pick one that has a lot of athletes (and preferably older athletes) for patients ... or at least has a sub specialty that includes athletes.
According to the 220-age formula my maximum HR "should" be 220-54 = 166
But actually my max HR is 192 (so the above formula is of no value to me)
My FTP HR is around 179
On a long hard ride (typically 6-8 hours) my average HR is usually around 155
On a long easy ride I'm usually averaging around 135
Resting HR is around 60

I'm reasonably fit, but nothing special. I ride typically around 10 hours per week on average following a structured training plan.

I haven't felt any need to consult a cardiologist about any of this. But if I did I would definitely pick one with experience of athletes and preferably cycling. But what I have done is a little self-education to get a good feel for what I should be doing. As I'm not doing anything extreme and feel great I don't overthink it and would hate to be riding with some artificial limit on my HR at this point.
PeteHski is offline  
Old 05-05-22, 08:42 AM
  #29  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 8,371
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4384 Post(s)
Liked 4,820 Times in 2,978 Posts
Originally Posted by GhostRider62

Some hearts are like 2 litre Rally Cars and others are like Big Block Chevies or Ford Powerstrokes. They can make the same power, but one motor rev's up to 8000 RPM and the other lugs along at 4000 rpm making the same power.
Good analogy. I definitely have a high revving, small capacity unit!
PeteHski is offline  
Likes For PeteHski:
Old 05-05-22, 08:58 AM
  #30  
Senior Member
 
Monkey Face's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: The Cotswolds, England
Posts: 619

Bikes: Giant Revolt 2. Velo Orange Pass Hunter flat bar

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Liked 35 Times in 16 Posts
I'd be afraid to use a HRM in case I see it go to zero.
Monkey Face is offline  
Likes For Monkey Face:
Old 05-05-22, 09:25 AM
  #31  
I'm good to go!
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 14,931

Bikes: Tarmac Disc Comp Di2 - 2020

Mentioned: 51 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6163 Post(s)
Liked 4,782 Times in 3,300 Posts
Originally Posted by Monkey Face
I'd be afraid to use a HRM in case I see it go to zero.
You'll do a face plant and not see anything long before it hits zero! <grin>

You might notice your vision start to get blurry as your HR goes too low for your current activity level.
Iride01 is offline  
Old 05-05-22, 09:38 AM
  #32  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 4,083
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2332 Post(s)
Liked 2,097 Times in 1,314 Posts
I am not sure if this is relevant to this HR discussion but older athletes can exercise at a much higher percentage of their maximum. Master level cyclists were able to ride at up to 98% of their VO2 max (table 3 in attached). Similar results with old marathoners. Seemingly paradoxically, I have noticed my HR to decrease at the same power or effort levels as I get fit. Something to keep in mind only using HR to train by.

https://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdo...=rep1&type=pdf
GhostRider62 is offline  
Old 05-05-22, 10:20 AM
  #33  
Senior Member
 
spelger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: reno, nv
Posts: 2,296

Bikes: yes, i have one

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1134 Post(s)
Liked 1,179 Times in 686 Posts
as i sit here reading this i measured my heart rate at 46 bpm. i happen to be one of those with the jimmy leg, always moving back and forth. i think i just have a normally low heart rate. rarely do i ever see anything in the 160 range and still rare in the 150 range. highest i have ever seen was 172 and that is what i use as my max. not even sure how long ago that was.
spelger is offline  
Old 05-05-22, 10:31 AM
  #34  
Senior Member
 
Monkey Face's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: The Cotswolds, England
Posts: 619

Bikes: Giant Revolt 2. Velo Orange Pass Hunter flat bar

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Liked 35 Times in 16 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01
You'll do a face plant and not see anything long before it hits zero! <grin>
Unless I'm riding a recumbent! Then nobody will notice, until I start going backwards downhill.
Monkey Face is offline  
Likes For Monkey Face:
Old 05-05-22, 12:07 PM
  #35  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 8,371
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4384 Post(s)
Liked 4,820 Times in 2,978 Posts
Originally Posted by GhostRider62
I am not sure if this is relevant to this HR discussion but older athletes can exercise at a much higher percentage of their maximum. Master level cyclists were able to ride at up to 98% of their VO2 max (table 3 in attached). Similar results with old marathoners. Seemingly paradoxically, I have noticed my HR to decrease at the same power or effort levels as I get fit. Something to keep in mind only using HR to train by.

https://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdo...=rep1&type=pdf
That's interesting. I take it that means their decline in VO2 max is larger than their decline at threshold.
PeteHski is offline  
Old 05-05-22, 04:24 PM
  #36  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 4,083
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2332 Post(s)
Liked 2,097 Times in 1,314 Posts
Originally Posted by PeteHski
That's interesting. I take it that means their decline in VO2 max is larger than their decline at threshold.
I don't know. My guess is FTP is more about the periphery and older athletes do not lose that and might actually continue to improve while the heart and lungs start to decline. I really do not know.

My FTP was close to 90% at 62 years old but is now around 75-78% of VO2 max power but getting better after my accident last year. I had read that older marathoners can run very close to their VO2 max whereas younger elite runners are in the 78% range for 2+ hours (whatever it takes to run an elite level......probably 2:20). Another oddity, my resting HR was around 50 pre accident but was 85-90 BPM for months after the accident and is only down to 67-69 now. I asked a lot of Docs about that oddity and only one had a plausible explanation for the high resting HR. He was an army trauma doctor in war time and he said the stress of healing makes the HR higher and that it might take months to come back down. Thus, I have been reading up on this HR stuff. I guess this also relates to a high morning HR and low HRV......body is telling you to take it easy that day.
GhostRider62 is offline  
Old 05-05-22, 04:35 PM
  #37  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 8,371
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4384 Post(s)
Liked 4,820 Times in 2,978 Posts
Originally Posted by GhostRider62
I don't know. My guess is FTP is more about the periphery and older athletes do not lose that and might actually continue to improve while the heart and lungs start to decline. I really do not know.

My FTP was close to 90% at 62 years old but is now around 75-78% of VO2 max power but getting better after my accident last year. I had read that older marathoners can run very close to their VO2 max whereas younger elite runners are in the 78% range for 2+ hours (whatever it takes to run an elite level......probably 2:20). Another oddity, my resting HR was around 50 pre accident but was 85-90 BPM for months after the accident and is only down to 67-69 now. I asked a lot of Docs about that oddity and only one had a plausible explanation for the high resting HR. He was an army trauma doctor in war time and he said the stress of healing makes the HR higher and that it might take months to come back down. Thus, I have been reading up on this HR stuff. I guess this also relates to a high morning HR and low HRV......body is telling you to take it easy that day.
My FTP is currently 78% of my VO2 max power, aged 54. I know for sure the only way I could get to 90% is if my VO2 max power dropped off considerably, while my FTP remained stable.
PeteHski is offline  
Old 05-07-22, 06:05 AM
  #38  
Junior Member
 
Fendertele's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 143

Bikes: Trek Domane SL5

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Liked 41 Times in 28 Posts
Were all different. Check with your doctor. I used to back off when my effort went above 155. The GP advised its ok to go to 180 during my physical.
My avg HR is lower since Ive been riding more which one would expect.
Fendertele is offline  
Old 05-09-22, 01:52 PM
  #39  
Full Member
 
Speedskater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Cleveland
Posts: 423

Bikes: Bob Jackson, Trek & Sampson

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 56 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 14 Posts
on the HRM I use different max rates for different lengths of time:
a 1 minute hill clime
a 15 minute strach
a all day ride
I know what happens if I exceed those limits.
Speedskater is offline  
Old 05-10-22, 04:39 AM
  #40  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 8,371
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4384 Post(s)
Liked 4,820 Times in 2,978 Posts
Originally Posted by Speedskater
on the HRM I use different max rates for different lengths of time:
a 1 minute hill clime
a 15 minute strach
a all day ride
I know what happens if I exceed those limits.
That's the same for everyone whether they like it or not! But you can only have one "maximum" HR. The others are all below that maximum.
PeteHski is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.