Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fifty Plus (50+)
Reload this Page >

What you get with a new bike purchase?

Notices
Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

What you get with a new bike purchase?

Old 06-30-22, 10:55 AM
  #26  
Dave Mayer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 2,164
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 866 Post(s)
Liked 222 Times in 144 Posts
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
Why not? Is your advice based on mechanical problems caused by installing/attaching these accessories to a new carbon road bike, or is it based on your personal sense of proper bicycling aesthetics overrides the customer's request for service?
On a carbon road bike there is no place to mount fenders, except those insecure and ineffective clip-on jobs. There is no tire/frame clearance to mount functional fenders either. No place to mount racks, again, except using hacks that could damage the frame. There is certainly no place or room to safely mount a kickstand.

But the more fundamental issue is that you drop $3k a carbon road bike to obtain efficiency, efficiency being measured as travelling a distance in the shortest time. These bikes are designed to be lightweight and aerodynamic. So no extraneous 'features', narrow, lightweight high-pressure tires, and a low riding position. Ballasting a thoroughbred bike down with impediments used to drag your grandkids in a trailer, or a basket to carry your cat, or your groceries demonstrates (expensive) bad judgement and that you simply bought the wrong bike.

I have several hybrid-style bikes with a more upright riding position used during more utilitarian riding. I ride these to the coffee shop, or in the rain, or on gravel. But to take a high-end road bike and add racks, etc. is just a misuse of good resources.
Dave Mayer is offline  
Old 06-30-22, 11:36 AM
  #27  
gthomson
Senior Member
 
gthomson's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: Great White North
Posts: 964

Bikes: 2013 Cannondale Caad 8, 2010 Opus Fidelio, 1985 Peugeot UO14, 1999 Peugeot Dune, Sakai Select, L'Avantage, 1971 Gitane Apache Standard

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 433 Post(s)
Liked 298 Times in 212 Posts
Well I like the idea of getting all of the above but understand that's not realistic. I think the cost of the bike might have some impact on those choices though - if I just bought a new bike for 10K I would expect a bit of "extra" attention. My last purchase was a mid range hybrid for my wife and they did a minor fitting for her and out the door. Free tune up for a year was also included, which is a good deal.
gthomson is offline  
Old 06-30-22, 11:36 AM
  #28  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 34,837
Mentioned: 202 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15910 Post(s)
Liked 10,157 Times in 4,950 Posts
The custom frame for my last complete bike cost more than $3,000. I got two King SS cages (installed) at a discount. I also got a 2% discount on the bike for paying with a check instead of a credit card. I didn't need a fitting, but the shop adjusted the saddle height a couple of times during test rides around the corner before I rode it 12 miles home. When the two-bolt stem turned out to be inadequate for me after a couple of rides the shop ordered me a new one and swapped it while I waited. And, of course, I got a couple of free tune ups after I had logged some miles. That summer, during a club ride, I lost a plate on a chain link on a different bike. I was near the same LBS. Limped over there and got it fixed while I waited. No charge for the labor, only the new quick link.

All that is a lot more than I got when I bought a $25K+ new car.
indyfabz is online now  
Likes For indyfabz:
Old 06-30-22, 11:52 AM
  #29  
10 Wheels
Galveston County Texas
 
10 Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: In The Wind
Posts: 32,636

Bikes: 02 GTO, 2011 Magnum

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1213 Post(s)
Liked 898 Times in 443 Posts
$800 bucks. Free Fit to it. Rode it for 39,000 Miles


__________________
Fred "The Real Fred"


Last edited by 10 Wheels; 06-30-22 at 11:59 AM. Reason: add
10 Wheels is offline  
Likes For 10 Wheels:
Old 06-30-22, 02:07 PM
  #30  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 29,270

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Liked 1,002 Times in 665 Posts
Originally Posted by Dave Mayer View Post
But the more fundamental issue is that you drop $3k a carbon road bike to obtain efficiency, efficiency being measured as travelling a distance in the shortest time. These bikes are designed to be lightweight and aerodynamic. So no extraneous 'features', narrow, lightweight high-pressure tires, and a low riding position. Ballasting a thoroughbred bike down with impediments used to drag your grandkids in a trailer, or a basket to carry your cat, or your groceries demonstrates (expensive) bad judgement and that you simply bought the wrong bike.

I have several hybrid-style bikes with a more upright riding position used during more utilitarian riding. I ride these to the coffee shop, or in the rain, or on gravel. But to take a high-end road bike and add racks, etc. is just a misuse of good resources.
The even more fundamental issue is that YOU might drop $3k a carbon road bike to obtain efficiency, some one else might buy that very same type of bike in order to drag their grandkids in a trailer, or a basket to carry a cat, or groceries because they feel like it; maybe they like the way it looks.

Yourexperience entitles you to pick the bike that you think best fit your needs, it doesn't make your reason to buy that bike any better or more worthy than someone else's reason, no matter how you developed your "attitude" towards other people and how they choose to use their own resources.
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Old 06-30-22, 08:48 PM
  #31  
big john
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 19,868
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4816 Post(s)
Liked 4,234 Times in 2,278 Posts
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
The even more fundamental issue is that YOU might drop $3k a carbon road bike to obtain efficiency, some one else might buy that very same type of bike in order to drag their grandkids in a trailer, or a basket to carry a cat, or groceries because they feel like it; maybe they like the way it looks.

Yourexperience entitles you to pick the bike that you think best fit your needs, it doesn't make your reason to buy that bike any better or more worthy than someone else's reason, no matter how you developed your "attitude" towards other people and how they choose to use their own resources.
Lighten up, Francis. What if he had said he would suggest to the customer there might be a better choice of equipment to tow a trailer than a race bike? Would that fly?
Some of your responses are so militant.
big john is offline  
Likes For big john:
Old 06-30-22, 09:28 PM
  #32  
Dave Mayer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 2,164
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 866 Post(s)
Liked 222 Times in 144 Posts
I spent much of yesterday helping customers that had existing performance bike achieve a more upright position, and lower gearing. This involved changing out the drop bars for flat bars, adding short riser stems and replacing the brifters with flat-bar shifters. Some derailleurs had to be changed because of shifter/derailleur incompatibilities. Cassettes were replaced with pie-plates, which involved changing out the derailleurs and the chain.

So a minimum of a few hundred dollars of parts per bike, and up to several hours of shop time.

I figure the racey-type bikes we worked on cost on average $1,500 when new, and then we added roughly $500 of parts and labor. The owners of these bikes could have had a more appropriate bike and better overall ride experience if they had originally bought a $1,000 hybrid, which they've now almost ended up with.

This doesn't factor their inability to use better brakes (such as V-brakes), and fatter more comfortable, flat resistant tires.
Dave Mayer is offline  
Old 07-01-22, 09:27 AM
  #33  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 29,270

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Liked 1,002 Times in 665 Posts
Originally Posted by big john View Post
Lighten up, Francis. What if he had said he would suggest to the customer there might be a better choice of equipment to tow a trailer than a race bike? Would that fly?
Some of your responses are so militant.
He wasn't discussing giving advice to a customer. He did write that he is offended by anybody who doesn't share his view of how to properly use or equip an expensive carbon road bicycle, and was doing it wrong, and provided the only proper reason to buy and use a 3K carbon road bike. After all he was a bicycle mechanic. Period.
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Old 07-01-22, 09:55 AM
  #34  
big john
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 19,868
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4816 Post(s)
Liked 4,234 Times in 2,278 Posts
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
He wasn't discussing giving advice to a customer. He did write that he is offended by anybody who doesn't share his view of how to properly use or equip an expensive carbon road bicycle, and was doing it wrong, and provided the only proper reason to buy and use a 3K carbon road bike. After all he was a bicycle mechanic. Period.
Sometimes you have to read between the lines a bit.
big john is offline  
Old 07-01-22, 10:51 AM
  #35  
t2p
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2022
Location: USA
Posts: 533

Bikes: Cannondale - Gary Fisher - Litespeed - Schwinn Paramount - Schwinn (lugged steel) - Trek OCLV

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 195 Post(s)
Liked 170 Times in 124 Posts
Originally Posted by big john View Post
My LBS guy retired a couple years ago. I had been buying bikes and stuff from him for 30 years. When we first met, I suggested he carry Kucharik toe warmers. He did and I sent people from my club there to get them. He always treated me like a friend after that and gave me discounts and even sold me the last bike I got from him at cost.
I couldn't have been more fortunate and now that he is closed I am out in the cold, cruel world all alone.
one fairly close LBS changed ownership a few years ago

one LBS I go to most often is great - but will likely change ownership or close in near future ; longtime owners are eyeing retirement

(this is the same shop where I got a new Stingray when I was a kid)


and one close friend who was a small custom frame builder - extremely knowledgeable - and had a small home shop (had a legit business ID) - unfortunately passed away a little over a year ago

I have also been very fortunate - but will also be out in that cruel cold world

Last edited by t2p; 07-01-22 at 10:56 AM.
t2p is offline  
Likes For t2p:
Old 07-01-22, 11:00 AM
  #36  
Skullo
Master of the Universe
 
Skullo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Utah
Posts: 178
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 55 Post(s)
Liked 88 Times in 46 Posts
Originally Posted by Dave Mayer View Post
I spent much of yesterday helping customers that had existing performance bike achieve a more upright position, and lower gearing. This involved changing out the drop bars for flat bars, adding short riser stems and replacing the brifters with flat-bar shifters. Some derailleurs had to be changed because of shifter/derailleur incompatibilities. Cassettes were replaced with pie-plates, which involved changing out the derailleurs and the chain.

So a minimum of a few hundred dollars of parts per bike, and up to several hours of shop time.

I figure the racey-type bikes we worked on cost on average $1,500 when new, and then we added roughly $500 of parts and labor. The owners of these bikes could have had a more appropriate bike and better overall ride experience if they had originally bought a $1,000 hybrid, which they've now almost ended up with.

This doesn't factor their inability to use better brakes (such as V-brakes), and fatter more comfortable, flat resistant tires.
Yup ! I see it all the time. I ride a Rivendell Sam Hillborne I built up myself from the bare frame. I still ride in a bent forward position, but not like I did on drop bar road bikes.I see people all the time on high end road bikes riding a more upright position than me.
My bike is more comfortable , but heavier and has all the mounts for anything I want to add. To each his own. I ride alone and no longer care about the high end speed and longer distance. I still climb anywhere I want because of the nine speed triple.
Skullo is offline  
Old 07-01-22, 12:47 PM
  #37  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 29,270

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Liked 1,002 Times in 665 Posts
Originally Posted by big john View Post
Sometimes you have to read between the lines a bit.
True; or wear blinkers and/or rose colored glasses in order to filter out what is actually written in order to come up with a reading that better fits a preferred version of bicycling wisdom.
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Old 07-01-22, 01:38 PM
  #38  
msalvetti
Full Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2021
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 223

Bikes: 2021 Trek FX Sport 4, ~1996 Mongoose Crossway 4.50

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 59 Post(s)
Liked 535 Times in 159 Posts
There is a LBS close to me that I value for nostalgia - it's where my parents bought me my first new bike around 1973, and they have serviced my old hybrid. But they are pretty small, and when I went looking for the bike that I thought would fit (a Trek FX Sport 4) they had no idea if/when they would get one, nor did they offer to order for me.

So I went to a much larger shop, and they told me they expected the bike in about 6 months (this was August 2021). I bought it from them in March 2022 ($2,200). Pretty much got nothing extra. I got an eyeball fit from the experienced salesperson ("Gee, that looks spot-on"), a test ride around the neighborhood, and a free check after 30 days.

No discount on accessories (I bought two bottle cages, fenders, a seat bag, a bar-end mirror, and a spare tube). They gave me the four little threaded tabs to mount the fenders. Needed pedals but they didn't have much in stock so got those on Amazon.

I'll have to pay for the next service. Their shop rate is $180/hr.

Mark

Last edited by msalvetti; 07-01-22 at 01:47 PM.
msalvetti is offline  
Old 07-01-22, 02:10 PM
  #39  
t2p
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2022
Location: USA
Posts: 533

Bikes: Cannondale - Gary Fisher - Litespeed - Schwinn Paramount - Schwinn (lugged steel) - Trek OCLV

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 195 Post(s)
Liked 170 Times in 124 Posts
Originally Posted by msalvetti View Post
There is a LBS close to me that I value for nostalgia - it's where my parents bought me my first new bike around 1973, and they have serviced my old hybrid. But they are pretty small, and when I went looking for the bike that I thought would fit (a Trek FX Sport 4) they had no idea if/when they would get one, nor did they offer to order for me.

So I went to a much larger shop, and they told me they expected the bike in about 6 months (this was August 2021). I bought it from them in March 2022 ($2,200). Pretty much got nothing extra. I got an eyeball fit from the experienced salesperson ("Gee, that looks spot-on"), a test ride around the neighborhood, and a free check after 30 days.

No discount on accessories (I bought two bottle cages, fenders, a seat bag, a bar-end mirror, and a spare tube). They gave me the four little threaded tabs to mount the fenders. Needed pedals but they didn't have much in stock so got those on Amazon.

I'll have to pay for the next service. Their shop rate is $180/hr.

Mark
at $180 per hour labor rate - this thread could also qualify for the 'planned obsolescence' thread
t2p is offline  
Old 07-01-22, 02:14 PM
  #40  
DowneasTTer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: North Central Florida
Posts: 798

Bikes: 2022 LiteSpeed CHEROHALA CITY, 2019 Canyon Roadlite 9.0 CF LTD, 2015 Giant FastRoad CoMax 1, 2001 Mongoose Pro Triomphe,

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 122 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 51 Times in 33 Posts
I have purchased 12 (6 times 2, 1 for me and 1 for Mrs. Downeastter) bikes over the past 10 years. Always buy in pairs so may not the same. However 4 pairs were purchased at my local Giant shop in Dunnellon, FL. These were fairly high end hybrid models (Carbon frames and the like). The shop owner always lowered the purchase price by at least $350 each. That was incentive enough to do all my business with the shop. However in 2019 I saw that Canyon was importing a super hybrid, the RoadLite 9 LTD @ $2999.00. Purchased two of those they will not deal, however they did give me free shipping and a couple of water bottles..... This spring while looking around for the ideal allrounder for rv travels I purchased a couple of LiteSpeed Cherolhala City bikes. At the time of purchase the base model was $2999.00 (currently $3245.00). Added the upgraded wheel set and rear derailleur plus changed the gearing. LiteSpeed took $700 off the cost of the bikes plus only charged $95 shipping each and then upgraded the shipping to their Home.Delivery.Right program which delivered the bikes built through Kitzuma.
DowneasTTer is offline  
Old 07-01-22, 02:56 PM
  #41  
big john
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 19,868
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4816 Post(s)
Liked 4,234 Times in 2,278 Posts
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
True; or wear blinkers and/or rose colored glasses in order to filter out what is actually written in order to come up with a reading that better fits a preferred version of bicycling wisdom.
Or just put yourself in the position of the writer for a moment.
big john is offline  
Old 07-01-22, 04:55 PM
  #42  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 29,270

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Liked 1,002 Times in 665 Posts
Originally Posted by big john View Post
Or just put yourself in the position of the writer for a moment.
I did, and read the lines, and even between the lines and came to the obvious conclusion about the attitude being expressed. It doesn't really take reading between the lines to find this attitude often expressed on this and several other lists where some LBS and bike club affiliated people post their strong opinions about the bicycling choices made by others who do not share their bicycling profiles.
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Old 07-01-22, 06:26 PM
  #43  
Sertsa
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 161
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 55 Post(s)
Liked 155 Times in 64 Posts
I bought my bike in early 2020, just before the pandemic shortage. It was the first bike I bought since around 1991. I decided to buy from this shop as they went to considerable lengths to make sure I was getting the correct-sized bike. After the sale they took some time to set it up and adjust it, went over quite a few things like Presta valves (which otherwise would have confused me), and made sure I was happy. Beyond that I had a free tune-up/adjustment, and they started a BikeIndex registry (with permission). And when I've taken in the bike for tune-ups and repair since, I've gotten occasional discounts and excellent service in general.

Oh, they also took care of a warranty issue when I couldn't get a response from the manufacturer.

So for me that's been perfect. No swag, but excellent service and ensuring I had basic knowledge and the right bike.
Sertsa is offline  
Old 07-01-22, 06:48 PM
  #44  
TakingMyTime
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Los Alamitos, Calif.
Posts: 2,221

Bikes: Trek 7.4 FX, Canyon Endurace CF SL

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 856 Post(s)
Liked 677 Times in 400 Posts
Heck, I'd be delighted if I could just find the bike I wanted in stock somewhere. I'd probably be willing to pay a premium.
TakingMyTime is offline  
Likes For TakingMyTime:
Old 07-03-22, 07:06 PM
  #45  
Roadhawg
Razza 4.0
 
Roadhawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2022
Location: Sierra Vista, Arizona
Posts: 9

Bikes: Tirreno Razza 4.0

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 1 Post
I gotta free water bottle with the LBS logo on it of course, but not from the LBS where I bought the bike. I was given the water bottle by another LBS (there are only two in our little town) where I spent a lot of money having my vintage bike retrofitted with newer, more modern components... lol 😆
Roadhawg is offline  
Old 07-03-22, 08:54 PM
  #46  
Rolla
Victimless Criminal
 
Rolla's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 2,567
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1138 Post(s)
Liked 2,749 Times in 1,224 Posts
My shop gives a 10% discount on any accessories or clothing purchased at the same time as the bike, one year of free adjustments (wheel truing, hub adjustments, tightening of bolts), and one comprehensive tune-up within the first year of ownership. The unwritten part of the deal is that you can get the 10% discount for a couple of weeks after you buy the bike, and once you are in our database we keep track of all of your purchases in case any warranty issues ever come up. Plus, beginners are invited to attend the monthly Sunday rides and maintenance workshops.
Rolla is offline  
Old 07-05-22, 08:02 AM
  #47  
locolobo13 
Senior Member
 
locolobo13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Phx, AZ
Posts: 2,008

Bikes: Trek Mtn Bike

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 239 Post(s)
Liked 1,681 Times in 548 Posts
My LBS usually gives c: a rudimentary fitting and a free 90 day adjustment. I've never spent more than $600 on a bike.
locolobo13 is offline  
Old 07-06-22, 10:14 PM
  #48  
tkamd73 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Menomonee Falls, WI
Posts: 1,597

Bikes: 1984 Schwinn Supersport, 1988 Trek 400T, 1977 Trek TX900, 1982 Bianchi Champione del Mondo, 1978 Raleigh Supercourse, 1986 Trek 400 Elance, 1991 Waterford PDG OS Paramount, 1971 Schwinn Sports Tourer, 1985 Trek 670

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 528 Post(s)
Liked 728 Times in 396 Posts
A new bike, that’s a good thing.
Tim
tkamd73 is offline  
Old 07-07-22, 05:53 AM
  #49  
Jtmav
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 39

Bikes: Trek Domane al5

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Liked 31 Times in 13 Posts
My LBS is employee owned and everyone there is a cyclist and not just kids. I think the value came in the pre purchase area. They listened and recommended several bike in all price ranges. I paid for an hour long fitting complete with videos of me on several positions, mostly wrong and finally correct. Free 4 week tune up and 1 one year free tune up as well. The usual swag free water bottles. Got a small discount on new helmet and bike computer. The bike I purchase was a Trek Domane AL 5.
Jtmav is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.