Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fifty Plus (50+)
Reload this Page >

An Interesting Performance/Aging Parallel - Golf vs. Cycling

Notices
Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

An Interesting Performance/Aging Parallel - Golf vs. Cycling

Old 12-11-22, 04:56 PM
  #1  
DaveLeeNC
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
DaveLeeNC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Pinehurst, NC, US
Posts: 1,673

Bikes: 2020 Trek Emonda SL6, 90's Vintage EL-OS Steel Bianchi with 2014 Campy Chorus Upgrade

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 411 Post(s)
Liked 146 Times in 98 Posts
An Interesting Performance/Aging Parallel - Golf vs. Cycling

This crossed my mind today while I was pedaling on my indoor bike. It would seem that the number of ftp watts that I have lost since age 65 (now age 73) is almost exactly the same as the distance that I have lost with my driver on the golf course (in yards). It is around 35 in both cases. Fascinating somehow and also discouraging somehow.

dave
DaveLeeNC is offline  
Likes For DaveLeeNC:
Old 12-12-22, 01:33 PM
  #2  
skidder
Bipsycorider
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Orange County, California
Posts: 1,635

Bikes: Why yes, I do have a few! Thank you for asking!

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1143 Post(s)
Liked 947 Times in 652 Posts
I'll never find out about that comparison. I only play golf once every decade, and that's to remind myself how much I hate it.

"Golf is a Good Walk Spoiled" - Mark Twain
skidder is offline  
Likes For skidder:
Old 12-12-22, 08:07 PM
  #3  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 18,869

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 113 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3572 Post(s)
Liked 1,568 Times in 1,145 Posts
I think the two are, at base, unrelated. The loss of FTP is aerobic. The loss of yards is neuromuscular. The neuromuscular loss can be regained, or most of it, IME. The aerobic loss, not so much.

It's more like the relationship between your mile run and how high you can jump. I've been in the gym now for about 8 weeks. My full squat for reps has gone from 60 lbs. to 150, my bodyweight. That's more that I did in my 50s. What?? Well, in my 50s I worked more on aerobic and put in a lot less time in the gym per week. Now my doc has temporarily (I hope) restricted my aerobic upper limit, so I'm working more on what's left, strength.

You could google "strength training for golf swing". And of course just swing and hit the driving range. Of course I'm not a golfer and maybe you've already done all that. It just seems to me that we can get better at what we work on, even now. There's also HMB. I wouldn't have gained that much strength that quickly without it. I'm fighting back with all the tools I've run across.

Re aerobics - I will say that the pedals have become a lot lighter since my legs have gotten stronger. My HR drift has become a lot less over time. Since I've been limited as to HR, I've been doing a lot of Z2 on my rollers.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 12-12-22, 09:30 PM
  #4  
Random11
Full Member
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: North Florida
Posts: 426

Bikes: 2019 Specialized Diverge, 2021 Cervelo Caledonia

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 230 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 297 Times in 151 Posts
Originally Posted by DaveLeeNC View Post
... Fascinating somehow and also discouraging somehow.
That's the trouble with monitoring your performance and keeping score. I ran the same 10 mile race every year for 29 years, until I reached age 67 and couldn't run anymore due to knee issues. I always felt like I was running just as fast as ever, but I kept a record of my times and that wasn't the case. Discouraging. I took up cycling in place of the running I used to do and if anything I feel like I'm going faster than ever. But I don't monitor my performance. No Strava, no GPS, no power meter, no heart rate monitor. Just me and my bike. Not discouraging.
Random11 is offline  
Old 12-12-22, 10:00 PM
  #5  
SurferRosa
seŮor miembro
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Pac NW
Posts: 6,908

Bikes: Old school lightweights

Mentioned: 78 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2945 Post(s)
Liked 4,245 Times in 2,256 Posts
It's waay easier to ride a bike with a rotator cuff injury. But shooting pain in that area can still be excruciating and slow you down.

If the pain is knee related, then golf is probably the better choice, given the course has a liberal cart policy (ie: not path only).
SurferRosa is offline  
Old 12-13-22, 07:38 AM
  #6  
DaveLeeNC
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
DaveLeeNC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Pinehurst, NC, US
Posts: 1,673

Bikes: 2020 Trek Emonda SL6, 90's Vintage EL-OS Steel Bianchi with 2014 Campy Chorus Upgrade

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 411 Post(s)
Liked 146 Times in 98 Posts
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
I think the two are, at base, unrelated. The loss of FTP is aerobic. The loss of yards is neuromuscular. The neuromuscular loss can be regained, or most of it, IME. The aerobic loss, not so much.

It's more like the relationship between your mile run and how high you can jump. I've been in the gym now for about 8 weeks. My full squat for reps has gone from 60 lbs. to 150, my bodyweight. That's more that I did in my 50s. What?? Well, in my 50s I worked more on aerobic and put in a lot less time in the gym per week. Now my doc has temporarily (I hope) restricted my aerobic upper limit, so I'm working more on what's left, strength.

You could google "strength training for golf swing". And of course just swing and hit the driving range. Of course I'm not a golfer and maybe you've already done all that. It just seems to me that we can get better at what we work on, even now. There's also HMB. I wouldn't have gained that much strength that quickly without it. I'm fighting back with all the tools I've run across.

Re aerobics - I will say that the pedals have become a lot lighter since my legs have gotten stronger. My HR drift has become a lot less over time. Since I've been limited as to HR, I've been doing a lot of Z2 on my rollers.
Speed in a golf swing (same as distance) is considered a fast twitch thing while ftp is clearly a mostly slow twitch thing. But if you do training to 'get those yards back' that you lost from age 63 to 73 (as an example), all that really means is that you were less efficient at 63 than 73 (IMHO).

But that does bring up a valid point. My age 65 reflects kind of the point at which I transitioned from serious golfer and less than serious biker to the other way around. 10 years ago I had a club in my hands 6 days a week and worked hard on my golf game and maybe got 4-5 hours a week in on my bike, but I did tend to ride hard with not much Z2 stuff. Now it is around double that on the bike, I play one round a week and other than a few chips shots or plastic golf balls in the back yard, not much else.

I doubt that my fundamental golf mechanics are any different due to that severe drop in practice time, but it probably does affect my golf fitness. Right now I am fighting spinal stenosis, severe arthritis in my left shoulder, and am bone on bone in both knees. It would take a really competent PT type to design a program that I could follow safely. I don't know how to find such a person and WAY more important would not know how to find out if I had NOT found such a person. Shoulder pain was like #6 on my list of 'things that hurt' until I innocently tried to swap planks in place of crunches as a core exercise. That was 6 months ago and at this point shoulder pain is my MOST limiting problem in daily life (and on the golf course and on the bike). I am not doing that again so I am very cautious about doing 'stuff that hurts' (and that is a lot of stuff).

dave
DaveLeeNC is offline  
Likes For DaveLeeNC:
Old 12-13-22, 08:09 AM
  #7  
Speedskater
Full Member
 
Speedskater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Cleveland
Posts: 368

Bikes: Bob Jackson, Trek & Sampson

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 6 Posts
If you measured the golf driving distances in meters, then this thread would not exist.
Speedskater is offline  
Old 12-13-22, 10:46 AM
  #8  
DaveLeeNC
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
DaveLeeNC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Pinehurst, NC, US
Posts: 1,673

Bikes: 2020 Trek Emonda SL6, 90's Vintage EL-OS Steel Bianchi with 2014 Campy Chorus Upgrade

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 411 Post(s)
Liked 146 Times in 98 Posts
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
snip
You could google "strength training for golf swing".
snip
If you think that the internet can be a source of bad cycling training advice, you should check out internet-based golf swing advice.

dave
DaveLeeNC is offline  
Old 12-13-22, 05:14 PM
  #9  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 18,869

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 113 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3572 Post(s)
Liked 1,568 Times in 1,145 Posts
Originally Posted by DaveLeeNC View Post
If you think that the internet can be a source of bad cycling training advice, you should check out internet-based golf swing advice.

dave
How would I know?
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 12-14-22, 06:45 AM
  #10  
PeteHski
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 4,987
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2511 Post(s)
Liked 2,697 Times in 1,700 Posts
Originally Posted by DaveLeeNC View Post
This crossed my mind today while I was pedaling on my indoor bike. It would seem that the number of ftp watts that I have lost since age 65 (now age 73) is almost exactly the same as the distance that I have lost with my driver on the golf course (in yards). It is around 35 in both cases. Fascinating somehow and also discouraging somehow.

dave
Okay so 35 Chickens vs 35 rabbits or whatever incompatible units. How do these losses look as a percentage change, because that would be ever so slightly more comparable? i.e. have you lost the same percentage of your peak FTP vs your peak golf driving range?
PeteHski is offline  
Likes For PeteHski:
Old 12-14-22, 07:42 AM
  #11  
DaveLeeNC
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
DaveLeeNC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Pinehurst, NC, US
Posts: 1,673

Bikes: 2020 Trek Emonda SL6, 90's Vintage EL-OS Steel Bianchi with 2014 Campy Chorus Upgrade

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 411 Post(s)
Liked 146 Times in 98 Posts
Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
Okay so 35 Chickens vs 35 rabbits or whatever incompatible units. How do these losses look as a percentage change, because that would be ever so slightly more comparable? i.e. have you lost the same percentage of your peak FTP vs your peak golf driving range?
If you are familiar with both sports you will know that ftp and drive distance occupy the same numerical range. For example Bradley Wiggins "one hour test ftp" when he set the one hour ride record in 2015 was 440 watts. The longest winning drive in the World Long Drive Championships was 435 yards (in 2017). In my case the two numbers are (and remain) about 5% apart.
DaveLeeNC is offline  
Old 12-14-22, 09:51 AM
  #12  
PeteHski
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 4,987
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2511 Post(s)
Liked 2,697 Times in 1,700 Posts
Originally Posted by DaveLeeNC View Post
If you are familiar with both sports you will know that ftp and drive distance occupy the same numerical range. For example Bradley Wiggins "one hour test ftp" when he set the one hour ride record in 2015 was 440 watts. The longest winning drive in the World Long Drive Championships was 435 yards (in 2017). In my case the two numbers are (and remain) about 5% apart.
That's what I was wondering as I'm not a golfer. So are you saying you have lost the same percentage of your FTP as you have golf yardage?
PeteHski is offline  
Old 12-14-22, 10:51 AM
  #13  
DaveLeeNC
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
DaveLeeNC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Pinehurst, NC, US
Posts: 1,673

Bikes: 2020 Trek Emonda SL6, 90's Vintage EL-OS Steel Bianchi with 2014 Campy Chorus Upgrade

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 411 Post(s)
Liked 146 Times in 98 Posts
Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
That's what I was wondering as I'm not a golfer. So are you saying you have lost the same percentage of your FTP as you have golf yardage?
Yep - a tad under 15% in both cases. What is interesting is that despite them being driven by very different types of skills (albeit both are physical skills), the decline seems to be similar. It stands out a bunch more on the golf course because distance is what you experience. On a bike your direct experience is speed and a 15% decline in power is not a 15% decline in speed (other than up hills). But there is that damn power meter staring you in the face

dave

ps. FWIW, the important parameters for golf distance are fast twitch muscles, your technique is a HUGE factor (absolutely HUGE), and flexibility is important. ftp on bike - mostly different stuff.
DaveLeeNC is offline  
Likes For DaveLeeNC:
Old 12-14-22, 11:05 AM
  #14  
PeteHski
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 4,987
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2511 Post(s)
Liked 2,697 Times in 1,700 Posts
Originally Posted by DaveLeeNC View Post
Yep - a tad under 15% in both cases. What is interesting is that despite them being driven by very different types of skills (albeit both are physical skills), the decline seems to be similar. It stands out a bunch more on the golf course because distance is what you experience. On a bike your direct experience is speed and a 15% decline in power is not a 15% decline in speed (other than up hills). But there is that damn power meter staring you in the face

dave

ps. FWIW, the important parameters for golf distance are fast twitch muscles, your technique is a HUGE factor (absolutely HUGE), and flexibility is important. ftp on bike - mostly different stuff.
Interesting observations. As a an ex-football (soccer) player, I really noticed the loss of acceleration and sprint speed in my late 30s. Far more than any physical loss on my bike.
PeteHski is offline  
Old 12-14-22, 11:26 AM
  #15  
Bald Paul
Senior Member
 
Bald Paul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Upstate SC
Posts: 1,213
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 577 Post(s)
Liked 1,104 Times in 519 Posts
I had to give up golf. After 348 strokes trying to get past that stupid little windmill, the mini golf operator told me it was time to close and I should just leave.
Bald Paul is offline  
Likes For Bald Paul:
Old 12-14-22, 02:00 PM
  #16  
jppe
Let's do a Century
 
jppe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 8,312

Bikes: Cervelo R3 Disc, Pinarello Prince/Campy SR; Cervelo R3/Sram Red; Trek 5900/Duraace, Lynskey GR260 Ultegra

Mentioned: 58 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 648 Post(s)
Liked 877 Times in 407 Posts
I’ve played golf 60 years and cycled 20 years. I’ve intentionally avoided measuring the metrics like power and swing speed but definitely track overall results. Interestingly both activities peaked in my mid 50’s. I set lots of PR’s cycling, riding with A groups, etc. I was hitting the golf ball further than ever. I noticed things starting to change in my early 60’s. And even more changes in about 5 year increments afterwards.

However with golf, I’m scoring as well as ever. The improved scoring is probably due to playing so frequently. What I’ve found is I don’t hit the ball as far, but as long as I’m hitting it solid it’s plenty far enough. I have clubs I can use where the ball will still go up to 230 yards so it’s just a matter of hitting a longer club. For me scoring depends on how well I chip and putt, which I’ve gotten really good at. My putting has been ridiculously good at times…..my buddies just laugh at some of the putts I’d make on a regular basis.

Cycling on the other hand has seen some pretty dramatic dips lately. I’ve ridden the least amount this year than in almost the last 20 years and it really shows. It’s hard for me to tell how much of the decline is age related vs just not training like I’ve always done. My goal is to get back to easily riding 60-100 milers on a regular basis. I don’t mind being a little slower, but I just want to be able to finish without struggling. It’s definitely a race against time…..
__________________
Ride your Ride!!
jppe is offline  
Likes For jppe:
Old 12-15-22, 05:49 AM
  #17  
PeteHski
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 4,987
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2511 Post(s)
Liked 2,697 Times in 1,700 Posts
I guess the depressing end game here is that both our biking FTP and golf yardage inevitably decline to zero sooner or later!
PeteHski is offline  
Old 12-15-22, 05:52 AM
  #18  
PeteHski
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 4,987
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2511 Post(s)
Liked 2,697 Times in 1,700 Posts
Originally Posted by jppe View Post
Iíve played golf 60 years and cycled 20 years. Iíve intentionally avoided measuring the metrics like power and swing speed but definitely track overall results. Interestingly both activities peaked in my mid 50ís. I set lots of PRís cycling, riding with A groups, etc. I was hitting the golf ball further than ever. I noticed things starting to change in my early 60ís. And even more changes in about 5 year increments afterwards.

However with golf, Iím scoring as well as ever. The improved scoring is probably due to playing so frequently. What Iíve found is I donít hit the ball as far, but as long as Iím hitting it solid itís plenty far enough. I have clubs I can use where the ball will still go up to 230 yards so itís just a matter of hitting a longer club. For me scoring depends on how well I chip and putt, which Iíve gotten really good at. My putting has been ridiculously good at timesÖ..my buddies just laugh at some of the putts Iíd make on a regular basis.

Cycling on the other hand has seen some pretty dramatic dips lately. Iíve ridden the least amount this year than in almost the last 20 years and it really shows. Itís hard for me to tell how much of the decline is age related vs just not training like Iíve always done. My goal is to get back to easily riding 60-100 milers on a regular basis. I donít mind being a little slower, but I just want to be able to finish without struggling. Itís definitely a race against timeÖ..
I'm in my mid 50s at the moment and for cycling I've found much the same. Despite being well past my physical prime, I do enough cycling and focused training to actually outperform my younger, less committed self. I'm not looking forward to the inevitable decline over the next couple of decades - if I go the distance.
PeteHski is offline  
Old 12-19-22, 08:03 AM
  #19  
jppe
Let's do a Century
 
jppe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 8,312

Bikes: Cervelo R3 Disc, Pinarello Prince/Campy SR; Cervelo R3/Sram Red; Trek 5900/Duraace, Lynskey GR260 Ultegra

Mentioned: 58 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 648 Post(s)
Liked 877 Times in 407 Posts
Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
I'm in my mid 50s at the moment and for cycling I've found much the same. Despite being well past my physical prime, I do enough cycling and focused training to actually outperform my younger, less committed self. I'm not looking forward to the inevitable decline over the next couple of decades - if I go the distance.
From my experience the focused training is the real key. As you know the training can be challenging and taxing but very rewarding once you get there. Sustaining the higher level seems like the real key. Itís so, so easy to let the conditioning slip and once it does, itís harder to get it back. I had a forced layoff a few years ago when I crashed and broke a hip resulting in an immediate hip replacement. I was in peak shape and could still hang with the faster riders, at least for a while. I lost both cardio and some leg/hip strength. As you know it can be really hard to get in peak shape, a good bit of suffering involved. I just didnít feel the motivation to get all that back. Just more suffering than I wanted to do. Itís also harder to get the conditioning back the older I get. I was able to get back riding distances but definitely at a little slower pace.

A second layoff occurred this year due to the distractions from selling and moving. Miles are probably the lowest itís been in 20 years. More conditioning was lost. But shouldnít have any excuses left, unless itís due to spending so much time playing golf and relaxing on the beach!!!

Anyway, lessons learned, avoid letting your conditioning slip and itís harder to get in peak shape as you ageÖÖ
__________________
Ride your Ride!!
jppe is offline  
Old 12-19-22, 09:00 AM
  #20  
PeteHski
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 4,987
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2511 Post(s)
Liked 2,697 Times in 1,700 Posts
Originally Posted by jppe View Post
From my experience the focused training is the real key. As you know the training can be challenging and taxing but very rewarding once you get there. Sustaining the higher level seems like the real key. Itís so, so easy to let the conditioning slip and once it does, itís harder to get it back. I had a forced layoff a few years ago when I crashed and broke a hip resulting in an immediate hip replacement. I was in peak shape and could still hang with the faster riders, at least for a while. I lost both cardio and some leg/hip strength. As you know it can be really hard to get in peak shape, a good bit of suffering involved. I just didnít feel the motivation to get all that back. Just more suffering than I wanted to do. Itís also harder to get the conditioning back the older I get. I was able to get back riding distances but definitely at a little slower pace.

A second layoff occurred this year due to the distractions from selling and moving. Miles are probably the lowest itís been in 20 years. More conditioning was lost. But shouldnít have any excuses left, unless itís due to spending so much time playing golf and relaxing on the beach!!!

Anyway, lessons learned, avoid letting your conditioning slip and itís harder to get in peak shape as you ageÖÖ
I think that's good advice. I try to train at a "sustainable" level and follow an annual plan based around my target events. So I'm not trying to hold an unrealistic peak indefinitely. Nor do I ever let my performance drop right off a cliff. Right now in my off-season I'm probably at about 80% of my peak potential. I'm actually recovering from a week of flu, so probably at my lowest point all year, but I don't feel like I have a mountain to climb. I can see how a major injury or life change would potentially break this routine. It's one of the reasons why I train mainly indoors over the worst of the winter weather i.e. reduce the risk of injury.
PeteHski is offline  
Old 12-22-22, 09:59 AM
  #21  
rydabent
Senior Member
 
rydabent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lincoln Ne
Posts: 9,805

Bikes: RANS Stratus TerraTrike Tour II

Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3234 Post(s)
Liked 997 Times in 598 Posts
These days golfing has very little exercise. It seems a high percentage use golf carts.

I worked with a small group of guys, and we golfed a lot. All of them retired before I did, and they thot when I retired I would resume golfing with them. When I did retire, they had medical problems and always rented a cart. So I took up biking a lot more. All but one of them are younger, and have quit golf because of physical problems. OTOH I still bike 20 to 35 miles every other day at 84, and am in far better health. Conclusion while I am blessed with good health, I contribute a lot of it to the physical exercise of biking. Stepping in and out of a golf cart and walking a few feet is not much exercise at all.
rydabent is offline  
Likes For rydabent:
Old 12-22-22, 11:11 AM
  #22  
DaveLeeNC
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
DaveLeeNC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Pinehurst, NC, US
Posts: 1,673

Bikes: 2020 Trek Emonda SL6, 90's Vintage EL-OS Steel Bianchi with 2014 Campy Chorus Upgrade

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 411 Post(s)
Liked 146 Times in 98 Posts
Originally Posted by rydabent View Post
These days golfing has very little exercise. It seems a high percentage use golf carts.

I worked with a small group of guys, and we golfed a lot. All of them retired before I did, and they thot when I retired I would resume golfing with them. When I did retire, they had medical problems and always rented a cart. So I took up biking a lot more. All but one of them are younger, and have quit golf because of physical problems. OTOH I still bike 20 to 35 miles every other day at 84, and am in far better health. Conclusion while I am blessed with good health, I contribute a lot of it to the physical exercise of biking. Stepping in and out of a golf cart and walking a few feet is not much exercise at all.
All my doctors are adamanet about keep up my activity level. That is a struggle as arthritis seems to be taking over all my joints, but so far cycling (with regular injections and a very expensive knee brace) remains a mostly daily activity. I have not tested anything past 40 miles lately, but up to that point things are manageable.

I was walking and carrying my clubs until spinal stenosis hit 2 years ago (yet more arthritis - this time in the lumbar area). At this point I honestly don't know if walking/carrying is harmful or not (stenosis is in remission at the moment and I am really afraid of changing that). Neither my doctors or PT's seem confident in their assessment of that risk. What is interesting is that a round of golf on a cart for me is typically around 7500 steps. A round of golf walking with my bag is around 9500 steps. I still prefer walking (even if it is not significantly more exercise) just because.

Congratulations on keeping things up at your level and age!!

dave

dave
DaveLeeNC is offline  
Old 12-22-22, 11:52 AM
  #23  
blacknbluebikes 
Senior Member
 
blacknbluebikes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: NJ, USA
Posts: 1,057

Bikes: two blacks, a blue and a white.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 367 Post(s)
Liked 609 Times in 296 Posts
Never has cycling made me ask "Am I always going to suck at this and look like an idiot?"
blacknbluebikes is offline  
Old 12-23-22, 05:44 AM
  #24  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 13,379

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 196 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4483 Post(s)
Liked 2,630 Times in 1,703 Posts
I gave up golf in high school after nearly decapitating a partner who began walking down the fairway while I was teeing up. I was mentally regurgitating the coach's list of steps, including keeping my head down after I'd initially scanned the fairway for people. I had no idea my partner would just begin strolling down the fairway.

He assumed I was good enough to hit well over his head. Apparently he'd never seen me play. Not once had I ever hit a proper shot off the tee. Like my baseball at-bats, I was a line driver. Fortunately he was quite short for his age and I missed him by a few inches.

The only other sports I played that involved striking a ball were baseball, racquetball and tennis. As baseball players go, I was a good outfielder. And I kept the other side busy with shagging ground balls and line drives. I was pretty good at racquetball.

But in tennis solo matches I hit a lot of home runs out of the court, something I rarely managed to do in baseball. And in doubles I managed to hit my partner in the back of the head at least once a match, usually two or three times.

Clearly, my background in amateur boxing was a terrible influence on my attempts to play ball sports.

As far as I can remember, I've never hit anyone with my bicycle. I've been hit by cars a few times. But generally speaking, friends are safer around me on a bike than with a ball.
canklecat is offline  
Old 01-08-23, 02:39 PM
  #25  
rydabent
Senior Member
 
rydabent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lincoln Ne
Posts: 9,805

Bikes: RANS Stratus TerraTrike Tour II

Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3234 Post(s)
Liked 997 Times in 598 Posts
Originally Posted by DaveLeeNC View Post
All my doctors are adamanet about keep up my activity level. That is a struggle as arthritis seems to be taking over all my joints, but so far cycling (with regular injections and a very expensive knee brace) remains a mostly daily activity. I have not tested anything past 40 miles lately, but up to that point things are manageable.

I was walking and carrying my clubs until spinal stenosis hit 2 years ago (yet more arthritis - this time in the lumbar area). At this point I honestly don't know if walking/carrying is harmful or not (stenosis is in remission at the moment and I am really afraid of changing that). Neither my doctors or PT's seem confident in their assessment of that risk. What is interesting is that a round of golf on a cart for me is typically around 7500 steps. A round of golf walking with my bag is around 9500 steps. I still prefer walking (even if it is not significantly more exercise) just because.

Congratulations on keeping things up at your level and age!!

dave

dave
Your doctor is absolutely right. If you set you rust.
rydabent is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.