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Any old guys here doing strength training?

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Any old guys here doing strength training?

Old 01-12-23, 10:53 AM
  #76  
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
I think I kept up with this thread for a while but then some of the info lost me. probably because I'm not so focused anymore. but I remember nutrition & nutrition timing was critical to any weight training gains. meaning they go hand in hand
That used to be the common wisdom, where you had a narrow window of time to eat to see gains.

It turns out that window is more like a barn door. If you eat 3 balanced meals a day, you're good to go.
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Old 01-12-23, 11:14 AM
  #77  
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What if I only eat once a day and fast often?

https://gero.usc.edu/2019/04/18/eat-...and-longevity/

https://novoslabs.com/best-fasting-m...d-weight-loss/

https://www.mdlinx.com/article/can-f...MFbyJEQLuOZ8KW

https://blog.insidetracker.com/inter...mmary-research
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Old 01-12-23, 11:57 AM
  #78  
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Originally Posted by prj71 View Post
What if I only eat once a day and fast often?
That depends somewhat on how long after the strength training is this once-a-day meal. 4-5 hours is probably fine. If it's 12 hours, you'll likely see some reductions in muscle gains.

The "anabolic barn door" to take on protein after exercise is believed to be 4-5 hours.

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There’s surely a period where your body needs protein to repair and build after a muscle-straining workout, particularly something like a max session in the weight room, a CrossFit WOD (workout of the day), or a high-intensity interval session. But it’s not so much an anabolic window, Schoenfeld says, “it’s an anabolic barn door.” As long as you eat breakfast, lunch, and dinner, it’s almost impossible not to get through. The barn door doesn’t slam shut 45 minutes after exercise. Instead, it stays open for four or five hours, maybe more.

Excerpt From Good to Go: What the Athlete in All of Us Can Learn from the Strange Science of Recovery, Christie Aschwanden, https://books.apple.com/us/book/good...n/id1397970427
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Old 01-12-23, 12:27 PM
  #79  
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Originally Posted by terrymorse View Post
That depends somewhat on how long after the strength training is this once-a-day meal. 4-5 hours is probably fine. If it's 12 hours, you'll likely see some reductions in muscle gains.

The "anabolic barn door" to take on protein after exercise is believed to be 4-5 hours.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Theres surely a period where your body needs protein to repair and build after a muscle-straining workout, particularly something like a max session in the weight room, a CrossFit WOD (workout of the day), or a high-intensity interval session. But its not so much an anabolic window, Schoenfeld says, its an anabolic barn door. As long as you eat breakfast, lunch, and dinner, its almost impossible not to get through. The barn door doesnt slam shut 45 minutes after exercise. Instead, it stays open for four or five hours, maybe more.

Excerpt From Good to Go: What the Athlete in All of Us Can Learn from the Strange Science of Recovery, Christie Aschwanden, https://books.apple.com/us/book/good...n/id1397970427
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Yes but, dont forget about the bigger increase at 24 hrs.



Muscle protein synthesis


https://www.semanticscholar.org/pape...ee9e42b80b5f27
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Old 01-12-23, 04:27 PM
  #80  
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
as in weighted walking? I saw a guy at my gym a cpl years ago wearing a weighted vest. scared the heck out of me. thought he was wearing something different. eek!
but in my area it's not uncommon to see ppl walking with packs of various sizes (for exercise)
What I mean by it is to put several # of dead weight in a back pack, suspended mainly by my shoulders, and to walk. It sounds to me that the weighted vest is effectively very similar, though perhaps it does not allow breathing as free as that with a daypack. But I'm just guessing. Can you perhaps share what weighted walking is, how it is done, and what the expected benefits are?

So far my experience is that 10# plus or minus is not very difficult, and we have that Mr. and Mrs. CarbonFiberBoy carry 20# when they go out, have (I think) worked up to it, and have done it for a considerable length of time. I think I'll do another at 10#, then add another book and try to find at what weight I start to feel a bit of strain. If there is a stressing strategy recommended for the vest approach, perhaps I'll imitate it.
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Old 01-12-23, 06:29 PM
  #81  
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Originally Posted by Road Fan View Post
What I mean by it is to put several # of dead weight in a back pack, suspended mainly by my shoulders, and to walk. It sounds to me that the weighted vest is effectively very similar, though perhaps it does not allow breathing as free as that with a daypack. But I'm just guessing. Can you perhaps share what weighted walking is, how it is done, and what the expected benefits are?

So far my experience is that 10# plus or minus is not very difficult, and we have that Mr. and Mrs. CarbonFiberBoy carry 20# when they go out, have (I think) worked up to it, and have done it for a considerable length of time. I think I'll do another at 10#, then add another book and try to find at what weight I start to feel a bit of strain. If there is a stressing strategy recommended for the vest approach, perhaps I'll imitate it.
no idea, but personally I like walks w/ a view
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Old 01-12-23, 08:21 PM
  #82  
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Originally Posted by Road Fan View Post
What I mean by it is to put several # of dead weight in a back pack, suspended mainly by my shoulders, and to walk. It sounds to me that the weighted vest is effectively very similar, though perhaps it does not allow breathing as free as that with a daypack. But I'm just guessing.
I suspect the weighted vest provides the training stress of backpack, except that it allows you to move around in ways that would be difficult/annoying with a backpack.

My wife and I were hiking one day at "The Dish" above Stanford, which is quite steep in parts, when we saw a young, muscular guy running laps while wearing a weighted vest. He lapped us twice. We were astounded.
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Old 01-13-23, 07:38 AM
  #83  
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There is something of a macho, quasi-military, cult around “rucking,” to wit, marching around with a weighted backpack. Having humped some big (and necessary!) loads long distances over difficult terrain myself, I’d rather take a nice walk.


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Old 01-13-23, 08:33 AM
  #84  
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Yeah, I've seen a few of those too, moltly with Army boots and olive T shirts. That's not me. I was never in the Military, never a back packer or over night hiker. I carried a full set of University textbooks in a back pack while commuting to classes and for a while in engineeirng jobs, but have been off those activities for >20 years, as far as the lugging books part goes! I just want to add a littoe boost to walking.

Anybody seen data or studies on how it may produce improvements of any sort?
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Old 01-13-23, 08:38 AM
  #85  
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Also, this guy is using a frame with a rather hefty (and seemingly mis-fit!!) hip attachment. That (back to my Eddie Bauer Store days!) hip belt is supposed to share a large frame load between hips and shoulders, so the hips don't take that full 75# or whatever. Somebedy should tell that guy that he should get a properly fit frame!

Frames did not have "straps," they had "suspensions."

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Old 01-13-23, 08:50 AM
  #86  
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used to tuck my school books in my shirt, when I was bike commuting, as a kid in 7th & 8th grade. I guess back packs were not as common in 1970-71, '72? when I bike commuted to HS 1973-'77 I don't remember carrying anything. don't think we even had water bottle holders back then. just a rat-trap. so maybe I did carry something?

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Old 01-13-23, 09:04 AM
  #87  
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Originally Posted by terrymorse View Post
I suspect the weighted vest provides the training stress of backpack, except that it allows you to move around in ways that would be difficult/annoying with a backpack.

My wife and I were hiking one day at "The Dish" above Stanford, which is quite steep in parts, when we saw a young, muscular guy running laps while wearing a weighted vest. He lapped us twice. We were astounded.
I could see the upper body atrributes working different ways based on the design. Too tight restricts torso xpansion and flexing, while too loose perhaps a not-well-supported load which moves around too much. But I'm just an amateur, guessing.

Anybody heard of any downsides to walking distancce with a lot of spinal load? I certainly don't want to change "too wimpy" to "can't move due to laminar or vertebral injuries!" This is one reason I'm starting with small loads, or so they seem to me!
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Old 01-13-23, 09:05 AM
  #88  
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It's hard on the knees.
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Old 01-13-23, 09:16 AM
  #89  
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Originally Posted by Road Fan View Post
I could see the upper body atrributes working different ways based on the design. Too tight restricts torso xpansion and flexing, while too loose perhaps a not-well-supported load which moves around too much. But I'm just an amateur, guessing.

Anybody heard of any downsides to walking distancce with a lot of spinal load? I certainly don't want to change "too wimpy" to "can't move due to laminar or vertebral injuries!" This is one reason I'm starting with small loads, or so they seem to me!
My take is it looks pretty harmless and maybe good for a basically healthy back, but people with low bone density should be cautious about axial loads. Thoracic vertebrae, in particular, develop compression fractures with minimal, or, seemingly zero, trauma. Old former Cat I buddy of mine now has an ugly kyphosis and chronic discomfort from a couple of crunched ones.
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Old 01-13-23, 12:12 PM
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Usually Gym 3 times a week before work and 3 rides a week:
Monday - Chest , arms, shoulder
Tuesday - Ride
Wednesday - Legs , core
Thursday - Ride
Friday - Back, Core
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Old 01-13-23, 10:54 PM
  #91  
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Originally Posted by MoAlpha View Post
My take is it looks pretty harmless and maybe good for a basically healthy back, but people with low bone density should be cautious about axial loads. Thoracic vertebrae, in particular, develop compression fractures with minimal, or, seemingly zero, trauma. Old former Cat I buddy of mine now has an ugly kyphosis and chronic discomfort from a couple of crunched ones.
I had similar thoughts to some of those being expressed in this thread about strength training, specifically barbell squats, and I think those concerns also translate into the realm of any sort of spinal loading.

I had gotten quite out of shape one winter many years ago and took my first Alpine ski of the year with a French friend who'd toured with the Dynastar demo team. While doing some particularly strenuous carving on hard snow, I felt and actually heard something give way in my back. I went to my doctor who ordered an MRI. The MRI reader of course missed the soft tissue injuries, but noted my lumbar stenosis, thin discs, and arthritic facets. I got the message that I was an out-of-shape older guy all right. I decided that I had to get serious with the strength training and did so. Though I had the concerns expressed above, I went ahead and experimented on myself doing hard and heavy back work. That was probably 20 years ago.

Today, my back is pretty much bombproof. I have osteopenia, here and there, but not in my spine. My discs haven't gotten any thinner. I had a bout of sciatica a few years ago. Stretching and heavy weight training made it go away and it hasn't been back. My wife and I go in with 40 and 60 lbs. respectively for our annual 10-day backpack. Our backs are fine with it.

Boiled down, I'm saying use it or lose it. If you have low bone density, the thing is to work it. In my 40s, I once sustained a compression fracture in a vertebra. I was carrying a 120 lb. long wet oak 2 X 12 by myself when I felt it go. So don't do that. but heck yes, carry a pack, load up your spine in the gym, work your back muscles as much as you can. They're what hold your spine in column. Start with moderate loads and work up to heavier ones over a period of a couple years. It's slow, but preventative exercise is a really good idea.

It's very, common for cyclists who do a lot of miles to have osteoporotic spines by the time they're 30. My mom essentially died from spinal compression fractures as her spine was badly osteoporotic. For exercise, she did water aerobics. Hard to think of a worse idea, though road cycling is right up there.

If you're worried about spinal bone density, go get a Dexa scan of your back - and femoral neck while you're at it. Then do something about it, whether you have that issue or not. One fall can change your life.

When I go out for local walks, I focus on pushing the pace. I think that's preferable in terms or body development to walking much more slowly with a pack. You want to get good at hiking with a pack, go the the gym with a backpack and hit the Stepmill for an hour. Stairway to hell, I call it. It's only boring until it starts to hurt. That, and fast walking or running without a pack will fix you right up.
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Old 01-14-23, 05:34 AM
  #92  
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Originally Posted by Road Fan View Post
Naaawwww, Waayyy too WIMPY! GGrrrr!

Glad to see you're still kicking around here!

Working as a landscaper?
I'm landscaping my own garden. I've hauled tonnes of rock last summer and a bit less this summer.

Moved another 100kg or so of rock today.

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Old 01-14-23, 06:15 AM
  #93  
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Originally Posted by gobicycling View Post
Yes, at 83 I do a regular series of strength training using a variety of resistance items. I put together my own set that I do every two to three days. This includes dips on a dip bar, some weights, heavy bands, push-ups, 1.5 to 3 minute planks, unweighted squats, etc. I lost my Pull-Ups due to a shoulder injury 3 years ago but I'm slowly working on getting them back. I also do 20 minutes of daily stretching, primarily of my lower body and back, due to having a cantankerous back. Add in swimming 40 minutes four times a week, indoor trainer 30 minutes daily, and walking.
Good for you! I have a very similar home gym, including the same squat rack. I try to do weight training 3x/week.
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Old 01-14-23, 12:38 PM
  #94  
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Originally Posted by rdsmith3 View Post
Good for you! I have a very similar home gym, including the same squat rack. I try to do weight training 3x/week.
I bought pipe at home depot, and used it with 90 connectors to make my own adjustable dipping bar using the squat rack. It's easy to do and I covered the pipe with foam rubber and use gloves. If you want a picture of what I did I can post it.
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Old 01-14-23, 02:09 PM
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Originally Posted by gobicycling View Post
I bought pipe at home depot, and used it with 90 connectors to make my own adjustable dipping bar using the squat rack. It's easy to do and I covered the pipe with foam rubber and use gloves. If you want a picture of what I did I can post it.
Thanks for the offer. I bought a used dip stand years ago.
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Old 01-16-23, 08:13 AM
  #96  
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Would this be considered weighted walking?

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Old 01-16-23, 10:14 AM
  #97  
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I'm 76 and go to the gym 5 X week. Everything I do is 3 sets of 10. Compression curls with 20 lbs each arm. Flys with 10 lb weights. Leg raises, leg curls, chest press, pull downs, I usually just use about 1/3 - 1/2 the plates so I don't really know lbs. I will check and amend this post.

Chest press.......135 lbs
Leg raises..........100 lbs
Leg curls...........100 lbs
pull downs.........120 lbs
Flys........,..........10 lbs
Curls..................25 lbs

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Old 01-24-23, 10:28 PM
  #98  
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Way late to the party for me. I used to do a lot of bodybuilding training when I was younger and not riding. 57 now and with severe lumbar stenosis (thank you heavy squats and leg presses). I am currently lifting weights 4 days a week and mix between heavy and light days. With the back situation the legs get some strength training but size and strength in the quads is usually maintained with cycling - I like to ride hard when I'm on my own and build the lactic acid in the legs. Cycling is the one relief I have to the constant pain in the back and legs. I have doubled efforts on the strength and cardio this winter after prostate cancer surgery a year ago and rising PSA numbers leading me down the road toward probable radiation treatment later this year. I'd rather have my body as strong as possible before that happens.
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Old 01-25-23, 10:31 PM
  #99  
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Originally Posted by scozim View Post
Way late to the party for me. I used to do a lot of bodybuilding training when I was younger and not riding. 57 now and with severe lumbar stenosis (thank you heavy squats and leg presses). I am currently lifting weights 4 days a week and mix between heavy and light days. With the back situation the legs get some strength training but size and strength in the quads is usually maintained with cycling - I like to ride hard when I'm on my own and build the lactic acid in the legs. Cycling is the one relief I have to the constant pain in the back and legs. I have doubled efforts on the strength and cardio this winter after prostate cancer surgery a year ago and rising PSA numbers leading me down the road toward probable radiation treatment later this year. I'd rather have my body as strong as possible before that happens.
Here's the John Hopkins on lumbar stenosis: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/heal...pinal-stenosis

Mine was diagnosed maybe 15 years ago with an MRI. No cure of course, but there's treatment. All I can relate is what I've done. Whether that's been effective could be totally personal, but I'll relate anyway.

1) I've been taking glucosamine sulfate, 750mg/day, for 40 years. Glucosamine hydrochloride does nothing as has been proven by many studies. So it might be just the sulfur, who knows? Seems to work, anyway. For the past maybe 20 years, I've also taken MSM, also containing sulfur. I've taken to capping it myself to save money so don't know the exact dose, 1 00 cap/day, anyway

2) Stretching, these stretches every morning: IT Band pain (during ride) Then I do a plank as long as I can, and then as many pushups as I can do, 1 set.

3) Walking. I use a slightly weird gait, where I rotate each hip in a circular fashion, walking as fast as I can with long strides, say 3 miles. This moves my lumbar spine around, avoids sciatica. Not every day, once or twice a week.

4) Gym. I started a strength training thread several years ago. scattered through it are PDFs of the periodized routines my wife and I still use: Introduction to strength training for the endurance athlete
Unfortunately, the powers that be here decided that PDF files can no longer be attached, so none of those PDF links work. If anyone's interested, I could email them the PDFs as attachments. Really too bad that they did that. So PM me with your email if you're interested.

Anyway, my back is just fine today, didn't deteriorate, got better in fact, so this worked for me.
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Old 01-26-23, 08:15 AM
  #100  
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
Here's the John Hopkins on lumbar stenosis: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/heal...pinal-stenosis

Mine was diagnosed maybe 15 years ago with an MRI. No cure of course, but there's treatment. All I can relate is what I've done. Whether that's been effective could be totally personal, but I'll relate anyway.

1) I've been taking glucosamine sulfate, 750mg/day, for 40 years. Glucosamine hydrochloride does nothing as has been proven by many studies. So it might be just the sulfur, who knows? Seems to work, anyway. For the past maybe 20 years, I've also taken MSM, also containing sulfur. I've taken to capping it myself to save money so don't know the exact dose, 1 00 cap/day, anyway

2) Stretching, these stretches every morning: IT Band pain (during ride) Then I do a plank as long as I can, and then as many pushups as I can do, 1 set.

3) Walking. I use a slightly weird gait, where I rotate each hip in a circular fashion, walking as fast as I can with long strides, say 3 miles. This moves my lumbar spine around, avoids sciatica. Not every day, once or twice a week.

4) Gym. I started a strength training thread several years ago. scattered through it are PDFs of the periodized routines my wife and I still use: Introduction to strength training for the endurance athlete
Unfortunately, the powers that be here decided that PDF files can no longer be attached, so none of those PDF links work. If anyone's interested, I could email them the PDFs as attachments. Really too bad that they did that. So PM me with your email if you're interested.

Anyway, my back is just fine today, didn't deteriorate, got better in fact, so this worked for me.
yes, pdf to dnvrfox@aol.com. How long do you hold your plank? I do between 90 and 150 seconds, and about 20 push-ups that are not in perfect form, but I do lots of other stuff. Thanks for the PDF, hope they come through. Denver
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