Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fifty Plus (50+)
Reload this Page >

Old Age And Stability

Notices
Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

Old Age And Stability

Old 04-08-23, 04:30 PM
  #26  
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 25,773
Liked 9,627 Times in 4,721 Posts
Originally Posted by Chuck M
He used his "medical expertise" to autopsy Sheldon Brown in another thread. Not only did he assail Sheldon's mechanical skills, he made ridiculous statements about his cause of death. When he was called on it, he claimed he was hacked and asked everyone that quoted his senseless comment to delete their posts.

He could use a trip to a couple a real doctors though. A proctologist and a brain surgeon. They could team to remove his head from his ass.
He also autopsied Jim Fixx in another thread. I don't usually respond to his posts and he seems harmless enough, but I don't get the medical advice stuff.
big john is offline  
Likes For big john:
Old 04-08-23, 04:43 PM
  #27  
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 25,773
Liked 9,627 Times in 4,721 Posts
Originally Posted by car5car
"Blood thinners" is enough for diagnosis
So far 3 people died, because they didn't do, what I told them to do. It doesn't matter why they didn't listen.
Dude. Cool it.
big john is offline  
Old 04-08-23, 05:32 PM
  #28  
Made it to 84 WHOOPIE
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 404
Liked 543 Times in 156 Posts
Originally Posted by car5car
Trying to help, it is easier not to.
If it's easier not to, then take the easy route and don't. That means don't post any more ridiculous diagnoses and your take on blood pressure, which is based on??. You fashion yourself an expert, you are not. You are more than likely just a troll, and I'm getting tired of reading your posts, which means I am now ignoring them in the future. I wish there was some way to block you and maybe there is, I'll check it out.
gobicycling is offline  
Likes For gobicycling:
Old 04-08-23, 05:34 PM
  #29  
Made it to 84 WHOOPIE
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 404
Liked 543 Times in 156 Posts
Originally Posted by car5car
Trying to help, it is easier not to.
If it's easier not to, then take the easy route and don't. That means don't post any more ridiculous diagnoses and your take on blood pressure, which is based on??. You fashion yourself an expert, you are not. You are more than likely just a troll, and I'm getting tired of reading your posts, which means I am now ignoring them in the future. I wish there was some way to block you and maybe there is, I'll check it out.
gobicycling is offline  
Old 04-08-23, 06:29 PM
  #30  
Grupetto Bob
 
rsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Seattle-ish
Posts: 6,680

Bikes: Bikey McBike Face

Liked 6,231 Times in 3,178 Posts
Originally Posted by gobicycling
If it's easier not to, then take the easy route and don't. That means don't post any more ridiculous diagnoses and your take on blood pressure, which is based on??. You fashion yourself an expert, you are not. You are more than likely just a troll, and I'm getting tired of reading your posts, which means I am now ignoring them in the future. I wish there was some way to block you and maybe there is, I'll check it out.
Go to Your User CP, and in the left most window - select Ignore List. Add the name and you are good except where other people quote him.
__________________
Road 🚴🏾‍♂️ & Mountain 🚵🏾‍♂️







rsbob is offline  
Old 04-11-23, 09:52 AM
  #31  
Senior Member
 
oldbobcat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Boulder County, CO
Posts: 4,489

Bikes: '80 Masi Gran Criterium, '12 Trek Madone, early '60s Frejus track

Liked 487 Times in 368 Posts
Originally Posted by Joe Bikerider
I’m 71 and have had similar concerns. But I am doing well by thinking that if things are going wrong I can always put both feet down and just stop. Like this morning on my favorite path I came across a couple with two little kids in strollers in an awkward situation. I had seen this in advance so it wasn’t a surprise. I just stopped and smiled and made a nice comment. Then we all went on our way. Hope you can have similar encounters.
You, sir, should consider an Electra Townie, the bike with flat-foot geometry. https://electra.trekbikes.com/us/en_US?clear=true
oldbobcat is offline  
Likes For oldbobcat:
Old 04-11-23, 09:59 AM
  #32  
Senior Member
 
oldbobcat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Boulder County, CO
Posts: 4,489

Bikes: '80 Masi Gran Criterium, '12 Trek Madone, early '60s Frejus track

Liked 487 Times in 368 Posts
Originally Posted by spinconn
At 74 I am just now getting back into riding after a couple of years away due to medical issues. I need to be particularly careful about falling as I am on serious blood thinners for a good while. When I last did a lot of biking it was on a Trek Marlin 7 MTB, though I had stopped riding off road and was using it mostly on MUP's with pavement or concrete surfaces. I am enjoying the Marlin again, doing just under 100 miles a week, but at a very slow pace. As I get conditioned, I am eager to increase my speed but not to the point of going back on a true road bike. I am not talking about racing or even setting personal goals on Strava, just the fun and enjoyment of a little speed and more nimble handling. I am looking at fitness hybrid bikes, but it occurs to me that among the other attributes of a MTB, they are very stable, and falls are less likely. But I could be wrong about that. I would appreciate any comments on how much less stable a hybrid, say like the Trek FX, would be. I took a Giant hybrid for a short test ride at the LBS and it seemed very stable, but it wasn't much of a test.
By all means test ride a couple in the fitness and comfort categories. I know I feel a lot more stable just sitting more upright with a flat handlebar. If these aren't stable enough, Trek also owns and distributes Electra, who makes the innovative Townie, which has the most stability you can get on two wheels.
oldbobcat is offline  
Old 04-11-23, 12:50 PM
  #33  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Walnut Creek, CA
Posts: 767

Bikes: 1969 Peugeot PX10, 1992 Della Santa, Linus Roadster 8

Liked 518 Times in 330 Posts
Originally Posted by oldbobcat
You, sir, should consider an Electra Townie, the bike with flat-foot geometry
It’s actually advertised as “Flat Foot Technology”. In our overheated world of marketing crap that takes the cake. I borrowed a bike like that from my daughter and find it impossible to ride. I really like having a top tube to help me guide the bike with my legs.
Joe Bikerider is offline  
Old 04-11-23, 04:32 PM
  #34  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: SC
Posts: 214
Liked 55 Times in 32 Posts
Well, again I would like to thank everyone who took the time to comment. Armed with all this sage advice, and a bunch of internet information, I went to look at several that caught my eye. I need not have been concerned. I fell in love with a Giant Contend4 AR as soon as I took the test ride. I bought it. The fit was perfect, and it had the quick and nimble feel I was looking for. I thought at the time it was a road bike, but I guess with 32 tires and the more relaxed geometry it is more like gravel and/or endurance bike. I feel very stable and secure on it and in two days have put 43 miles on it. Would have been more but for a flat today. I think agility and quickness might get you out of as many close calls as thin tires might get you into, at least on pavement. What a grand sport we have that allows one so much fun at such an old age.
spinconn is offline  
Likes For spinconn:
Old 04-11-23, 04:53 PM
  #35  
Expired Member
 
shelbyfv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: TN
Posts: 12,224
Liked 6,118 Times in 3,087 Posts
Originally Posted by big john
Dude. Cool it.
Apparently gone to the Big Chill. Many thanks to whomever.
shelbyfv is online now  
Likes For shelbyfv:
Old 04-11-23, 07:00 PM
  #36  
Senior Member
 
oldbobcat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Boulder County, CO
Posts: 4,489

Bikes: '80 Masi Gran Criterium, '12 Trek Madone, early '60s Frejus track

Liked 487 Times in 368 Posts
Originally Posted by Joe Bikerider
It’s actually advertised as “Flat Foot Technology”. In our overheated world of marketing crap that takes the cake. I borrowed a bike like that from my daughter and find it impossible to ride. I really like having a top tube to help me guide the bike with my legs.
Thank you for your thoughtful opinion, Mr. Arbiter of Everything. Just because you don't like something doesn't mean it's crap. I'll know better next time not to try to make helpful suggestions to you.

Last edited by oldbobcat; 04-11-23 at 07:08 PM.
oldbobcat is offline  
Old 04-11-23, 08:39 PM
  #37  
Abuse Magnet
 
arex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,870

Bikes: '91 Mtn Tek Vertical, '74 Raleigh Sports, '72 Raleigh Twenty, '84 Univega Gran Turismo, '09 Surly Karate Monkey, '92 Burley Rock-n-Roll, '86 Miyata 310, '76 Raleigh Shopper

Liked 177 Times in 90 Posts
https://biria.com/series/easy-boarding
arex is offline  
Old 04-12-23, 09:21 PM
  #38  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2022
Posts: 182
Liked 52 Times in 32 Posts
Originally Posted by spinconn
Thanks for the input guys, much appreciated. My question was not well phrased. I am not concerned about my handling skills or balance. It has been a long time since I rode a bike with skinny wheels and tires. I am thinking of a new bike for the same reasons everyone likes less weight on their bike. But until I get off blood thinners, I need to be careful about impacts and I simply can't recall how thinner tires felt with regard to close calls and sudden maneuvers. I don't think I ever thought about it before. But, thinking about a new lighter, skinnier bike got me thinking it might be a little safer to stay on the MTB. I think the tie breaker will turn out to be how great a new shiny bike looks. No sense being totally rational.
I had the same issues, went to a folding bike, lower center, easier mount and dismount and the smaller wheels are much less squirmy imho. Tires are your choice, but paul at origami has great choices of bikes for very decent prices. I use a 1.95 on mine, but have a few sets of different sizes. I feel like if I do start to go down on this 20 inch wheel bike it's much easier to save and if you do go over it's not as far to fall. Easier, as it were, to get feet on the ground faster.
jdogg111 is offline  
Old 04-13-23, 04:12 AM
  #39  
Full Member
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 276
Liked 208 Times in 106 Posts
I would second the tadpole trike, I use mine on the MUP's when I feel a little fatigued, or just a little off, and still want to ride. You still get a good cardio workout, get outside and enjoy the scenery,and a lot less worry about falling.
FREEBIRD1 is offline  
Old 04-13-23, 08:25 AM
  #40  
Veteran Racer
 
TejanoTrackie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ciudad de Vacas, Tejas
Posts: 11,760

Bikes: 32 frames + 80 wheels

Liked 771 Times in 434 Posts
Originally Posted by spinconn
I fell in love with a Giant Contend4 AR as soon as I took the test ride. I bought it.
Well, I guess I know why that brand name is Giant, since they don't make bikes for short adults like me. That model that you bought won't fit anyone under 5'-5", and I'm a lot shorter than that. Anyway, it looks like a nice bike and I'm glad that you like it.
__________________
What, Me Worry? - Alfred E. Neuman

Originally Posted by Dcv
I'd like to think i have as much money as brains.
I see the light at the end of the tunnel, but the tunnel keeps getting longer - me
TejanoTrackie is offline  
Old 04-13-23, 08:33 AM
  #41  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 4,083
Liked 2,097 Times in 1,314 Posts
Balance declines steadily after the age of 50.

The highest percentage of cycling deaths are males aged 60+

I double flatted on a bad road at age 63. I could not keep it up and went down at 20 mph. Broke 10 bones. Trauma Center broke another one in order to access my shattered elbow.

I plan to be on three wheels in my 70's. A velomobile if the budget allows
GhostRider62 is offline  
Old 04-13-23, 08:59 AM
  #42  
Veteran Racer
 
TejanoTrackie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ciudad de Vacas, Tejas
Posts: 11,760

Bikes: 32 frames + 80 wheels

Liked 771 Times in 434 Posts
Originally Posted by GhostRider62
Balance declines steadily after the age of 50.

The highest percentage of cycling deaths are males aged 60+

I double flatted on a bad road at age 63. I could not keep it up and went down at 20 mph. Broke 10 bones. Trauma Center broke another one in order to access my shattered elbow.

I plan to be on three wheels in my 70's. A velomobile if the budget allows
I'm approaching 77, and still don't notice any significant balance issues. Now, perhaps my reflexes in an extreme situation such you describe would not be as good, but I try to avoid getting into those situations in the first place. I know many octogenarians who still ride and even race bicycles w/o any problems. Don't sell yourself short just because of one very unusual bad event.
__________________
What, Me Worry? - Alfred E. Neuman

Originally Posted by Dcv
I'd like to think i have as much money as brains.
I see the light at the end of the tunnel, but the tunnel keeps getting longer - me
TejanoTrackie is offline  
Old 04-13-23, 09:26 AM
  #43  
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 19,676

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Liked 2,031 Times in 1,442 Posts
Originally Posted by GhostRider62
Balance declines steadily after the age of 50.

The highest percentage of cycling deaths are males aged 60+

I double flatted on a bad road at age 63. I could not keep it up and went down at 20 mph. Broke 10 bones. Trauma Center broke another one in order to access my shattered elbow.

I plan to be on three wheels in my 70's. A velomobile if the budget allows
I dunno. I still ride my rollers just fine at 77, don't notice a difference. Had 2 syncopes on them, went down, no damage other than floor rash. IME speed doesn't matter except for road rash and ruined clothing. It's probably individual. BTW I had my balance nerves and some audio nerves severed in one ear when I hit a tree with my head while BC skiing. Took me a while to recover from that, but soon I was back to putting my shoes on while standing. My brain filled in for the missing frequencies, too. Brains are amazing.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is online now  
Old 04-13-23, 09:51 AM
  #44  
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 25,773
Liked 9,627 Times in 4,721 Posts
Originally Posted by TejanoTrackie
Well, I guess I know why that brand name is Giant, since they don't make bikes for short adults like me. That model that you bought won't fit anyone under 5'-5", and I'm a lot shorter than that. Anyway, it looks like a nice bike and I'm glad that you like it.
They list an extra small and if that doesn't work Giant has a line called "Liv" which goes smaller. Supposed to fit riders down to 4'11".
big john is offline  
Old 04-13-23, 10:21 AM
  #45  
Veteran Racer
 
TejanoTrackie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ciudad de Vacas, Tejas
Posts: 11,760

Bikes: 32 frames + 80 wheels

Liked 771 Times in 434 Posts
Originally Posted by big john
They list an extra small and if that doesn't work Giant has a line called "Liv" which goes smaller. Supposed to fit riders down to 4'11".
That XS is only available in the most expensive Contend AR 1 model, which is nearly twice as much as the Contend AR 4 model that the OP bought. It is also only available at select dealers for local pickup, the nearest dealer to me being 750 miles away. As to the Liv models, I found just one road model that will fit riders down to 5'-2", which would work for me. Still, in its totality, Giant has very few offerings for shorter adults when compared to other brands. This is academic, since I've found small models from Trek (Emonda SLR 7) and Specialized (Sirrus X 5.0) that fit me and suit my needs that I was able to purchase from local bike shops.

Edit: It appears that the Liv lineup is meant for women, so they might not fit men properly. Looking at the geometry charts, the top tube lengths are too short for men in the XS sizes. The problem is that women tend to have longer legs and shorter arms relative to men. Also, the handlebars are very narrow, since women tend to have narrower shoulders than men.
__________________
What, Me Worry? - Alfred E. Neuman

Originally Posted by Dcv
I'd like to think i have as much money as brains.
I see the light at the end of the tunnel, but the tunnel keeps getting longer - me

Last edited by TejanoTrackie; 04-13-23 at 10:36 AM.
TejanoTrackie is offline  
Old 04-13-23, 10:42 AM
  #46  
Senior Member
 
zandoval's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bastrop Texas
Posts: 4,640

Bikes: Univega, Peu P6, Peu PR-10, Ted Williams, Peu UO-8, Peu UO-18 Mixte, Peu Dolomites

Liked 1,740 Times in 1,117 Posts
I have a Mixte waiting for a build. I got it a few years ago anticipating the days I would not be able ta get up on my bikes. I have not fixed it up yet but it is there waiting.

What has really helped me in my transition into Geazerdom after a critical fall is just being careful, all the time. I have made no really big changes in my bikes. My seat is a little lower, my bars a little higher, my tires a little wider, and that big gear in the back certainly has more teeth now, but really not that much as far as the bikes go.

The way I ride is MUCH CHANGED!

I no longer ride at night. Weather needs to be good. Routes with traffic, never. Single track very infrequent. Yep... Its just pitiful... But my rides are very nice and almost everyday. Not far. Not too long. But most enjoyable!

The one thing that has helped me to get along now days is just being careful. My Pre-Flight check list is long. And I am always picking out the next spot I will land, planed or not...

Ya do what ya gotta do... To ride.
__________________
No matter where you're at... There you are... Δf:=f(1/2)-f(-1/2)
zandoval is offline  
Old 04-13-23, 10:52 AM
  #47  
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 25,773
Liked 9,627 Times in 4,721 Posts
Originally Posted by TejanoTrackie
That XS is only available in the most expensive Contend AR 1 model, which is nearly twice as much as the Contend AR 4 model that the OP bought. It is also only available at select dealers for local pickup, the nearest dealer to me being 750 miles away. As to the Liv models, I found just one road model that will fit riders down to 5'-2", which would work for me. Still, in its totality, Giant has very few offerings for shorter adults when compared to other brands. This is academic, since I've found small models from Trek (Emonda SLR 7) and Specialized (Sirrus X 5.0) that fit me and suit my needs that I was able to purchase from local bike shops.

Edit: It appears that the Liv lineup is meant for women, so they might not fit men properly. Looking at the geometry charts, the top tube lengths are too short for men in the XS sizes. The problem is that women tend to have longer legs and shorter arms relative to men. Also, the handlebars are very narrow, since women tend to have narrower shoulders than men.
I know certain models don't work for those of us who have a fit outside of the "normal" realm. You seem to know what you need.

The debate about "women specific" geometry went on a few years back and several manufacturers had bikes made that way. I think Giant is the only one left.
Whether one of the Liv bikes will fit a man depends on the body of that man and the geo of the bike in question. Bars, stems, saddles, etc. can be swapped at time of purchase. with my last road bike I swapped the bar, stem, saddle, post, crankset, and cassette to make it work. As I'm sure you know, we are not all the same.
big john is offline  
Old 04-13-23, 01:28 PM
  #48  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 4,083
Liked 2,097 Times in 1,314 Posts
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy
I dunno. I still ride my rollers just fine at 77, don't notice a difference. Had 2 syncopes on them, went down, no damage other than floor rash. IME speed doesn't matter except for road rash and ruined clothing. It's probably individual. BTW I had my balance nerves and some audio nerves severed in one ear when I hit a tree with my head while BC skiing. Took me a while to recover from that, but soon I was back to putting my shoes on while standing. My brain filled in for the missing frequencies, too. Brains are amazing.

I do know.

Speed is a risk factor, hit something/anything at 1 mph isn't the same risk as at 10, 20, or 30 mph. Physics.

There are plenty of studies showing reduced balance for older adults to the extent it is not even debatable. You are a backpacker, which is probably THE best way to maintain balance. When I was doing the Appalachian Trail a few years back, everyone was so happy to see an old person like me on it. Most 77 year olds have a hard time getting off the sofa. Basically, you and I are something like 2 or 3 or 4 standard deviations from the norm. The average newborn male will never get up once they hit 74.5 years of age. I used to play ice hockey at a high level, might have been able to go pro. When I skate now, those fast movements that require balance, strength, and perfect vestibular function leave me very frustrated.

A balance board is also a good way to maintain a steady foot.

Syncope is a balance problem. Imagine if you lost balance in that manner at 20 mph. I would imagine you did not have fainting spells at a younger age?

I notice my balance weakens at about 160-220 miles into a brevet. I have to be careful dismounting. I never had such concerns as a younger man.
GhostRider62 is offline  
Old 04-13-23, 03:36 PM
  #49  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Hacienda Hgts
Posts: 2,163

Bikes: 1999 Schwinn Peloton Ultegra 10, Kestrel RT-1000 Ultegra, Trek Marlin 6 Deore 29'er

Liked 2,018 Times in 969 Posts
Originally Posted by spinconn
At 74 I am just now getting back into riding after a couple of years away due to medical issues. I need to be particularly careful about falling as I am on serious blood thinners for a good while. When I last did a lot of biking it was on a Trek Marlin 7 MTB, though I had stopped riding off road and was using it mostly on MUP's with pavement or concrete surfaces. I am enjoying the Marlin again, doing just under 100 miles a week, but at a very slow pace. As I get conditioned, I am eager to increase my speed but not to the point of going back on a true road bike. I am not talking about racing or even setting personal goals on Strava, just the fun and enjoyment of a little speed and more nimble handling. I am looking at fitness hybrid bikes, but it occurs to me that among the other attributes of a MTB, they are very stable, and falls are less likely. But I could be wrong about that. I would appreciate any comments on how much less stable a hybrid, say like the Trek FX, would be. I took a Giant hybrid for a short test ride at the LBS and it seemed very stable, but it wasn't much of a test.
After a couple crashes that exacerbated rotator cuff injuries, I swapped a Salsa steel fork onto my Trek Marlin 6 and put on some Marathon touring tires to make it my hybrid.
Heavy 35+ lbs but stable and the 47-622 tires roll well but are heavy.
I am more concerned with a 3-5 hour solo fitness workout rather than speed or group rides.
If you are primarily on flat or rolling terrain, I would not sweat the weight of the bike.
Just my 2 cents if you are exploring just keeping the Marlin.
CAT7RDR is offline  
Old 04-13-23, 03:56 PM
  #50  
Made it to 84 WHOOPIE
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 404
Liked 543 Times in 156 Posts
I have been on blood thinners for a number of years now, and don't let being on them influence my riding choices or locations. I think too much is made of the supposed dangers of blood thinners. Otherwise my stability is very good in my mid 80s, riding a mountain bike and a skinny tired road bike circa 1999.
gobicycling is offline  
Likes For gobicycling:

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.