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Anyone here still on a more race-type bike?

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Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

Anyone here still on a more race-type bike?

Old 04-19-23, 02:04 PM
  #26  
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My wife and I both own near top end 2022 …mondas. We both turn 72 this year. My “backup” bike is a 2021 Colnago and hers is a Specialized Amira Pro. Granted, we’ve been riding 40+ years and both come from a racing background but we both feel like kids on the bike. Off the bike, we both feel our age.

Seriously, I feel more normal/younger on the bike than off.
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Old 04-19-23, 02:59 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by WT21
But when I go to the LBS, they see my gray hair, and tell me I should be on an endurance bike. When I ask about an Emonda, or TCR, or Tarmac they say "have you been on one of those? I guess we can raise up the handle bars and make it like your Domane."?
Yes, lots of us ride race bikes every day and race. Look to any masters race, state games, or senior games to fine lots of folks in their 50s, 60s, 70s, and even 80s training and racing at very high levels.

With that said, the question your LBS is asking is reasonable. Have you ridden the bikes your interested in? The handling is very different, and you'd be well advised to spend some time test riding as many different race bikes as you can to get a better handle on what you like and don't like.
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Old 04-19-23, 03:15 PM
  #28  
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Endurance geometry is much like that of bikes built for triathletes in the 1980's with greater fork rake for increased stability. It was assumed that after the long swimming event that the athletes would benefit from a bike that required less attention to keep it going straight. The Centurion Iron Man bike is a good example and one that I owned and loved to ride.

To me the difference in handling is like the difference between a Jeep and a Miata on the highway. The longer the drive and the more twists in the road the more I would want to be driving the Miata.

The opposite are bike frames meant for criterium races on short courses with many sharp turns. This frame geometry dominated road bikes produced for decades. The availability of "endurance" bike frames is to me a very positive bike and probably the better choice for 90% of riders who do not participate in short course races.

The longer top tube also works well to allow the rider to stretch out a bit more and not be scrunched up when riding. I find this helps my breathing when attacking a hill.
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Old 04-19-23, 03:20 PM
  #29  
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What is the difference between the Domane and the ordered TCR? I don't have anything modern CF but racey bikes like a Cannondale 3.0 or a Allez SE are race bikes that ride racey regardless of saddle to bar drop.
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Old 04-19-23, 03:22 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by Trsnrtr
Seriously, I feel more normal/younger on the bike than off.
I just got back from a ride and I must say this is a very applicable statement for me as well. It's amazing the difference of age I feel before I get on the bike compared to when I'm on the bike.
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Old 04-19-23, 04:09 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Calsun
Endurance geometry is much like that of bikes built for triathletes in the 1980's with greater fork rake for increased stability. It was assumed that after the long swimming event that the athletes would benefit from a bike that required less attention to keep it going straight.
You've got it backwards. Increasing the fork rake (offset) results in less trail, which in turn speeds up steering and decreases stability. In order to maintain a certain amount of trail, it is necessary to decrease the frame's head tube angle when increasing the fork offset. If you really want to increase stability, then reduce the fork offset while maintaining the same head tube angle, which will increase the trail. The main advantage to increased fork rake is that it provides clearance for wider tires and also allows the fork to flex more for increased comfort on rough surfaces.
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Old 04-19-23, 04:18 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Classtime
What is the difference between the Domane and the ordered TCR?
Not an awful lot, really, other than the fact the Domane accommodates wider tires and has lower gearing. The difference in tire size has more impact on handling than the slight differences in geometry.
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Old 04-19-23, 05:03 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by Calsun
Endurance geometry is much like that of bikes built for triathletes in the 1980's with greater fork rake for increased stability. It was assumed that after the long swimming event that the athletes would benefit from a bike that required less attention to keep it going straight. The Centurion Iron Man bike is a good example and one that I owned and loved to ride.

To me the difference in handling is like the difference between a Jeep and a Miata on the highway. The longer the drive and the more twists in the road the more I would want to be driving the Miata.

The opposite are bike frames meant for criterium races on short courses with many sharp turns. This frame geometry dominated road bikes produced for decades. The availability of "endurance" bike frames is to me a very positive bike and probably the better choice for 90% of riders who do not participate in short course races.

The longer top tube also works well to allow the rider to stretch out a bit more and not be scrunched up when riding. I find this helps my breathing when attacking a hill.
Do endurance frames have longer top tubes than race bikes? I thought endurance top tubes were shorter, and the head tubes were longer.
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Old 04-19-23, 07:24 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by terrymorse
Do endurance frames have longer top tubes than race bikes? I thought endurance top tubes were shorter, and the head tubes were longer.
Yes. More than 2cm shorter for Cannondale Synapse compared to the System Six.
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Old 04-19-23, 08:30 PM
  #35  
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I picked up an '83 Pro Miyata last summer, narrow tubed steel but pure race and about as good as narrow tubed steel gets. Got it hoping it would be the ride of the '76 Fuji Pro that I raced was. And yes, only a lot better. Tubing came a long ways in those few years. So did Japanese race bike design.

And the ride? Well the position is my old race bike except much longer reach and bars are a little higher. The ride? Like I said, pure race. Doesn't remotely pretend to be anything else. 25c rear tires don't even turn unless you deflate them. Like my old Fuji.

Yes I did compromise on the crankset. 'Bout to hit 70. So it's a Campy Chorus triple. 53-42-30. 13-26 7 speed. (Big step down from the 53-42 x 13-19 5-speed I raced much of New England on but it still feels 100% race. Now the wheels - Tubular with tires that are close to what I raced. Mavic GPs and GEL330s. One step heavier now than then. Same spokes gauge-wise; light! Clipless, not toeclips but still no-float. Once I'm clipped in and rolling, this bike takes me to the same place. (Just slower but that's an engine issue.)
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Old 04-19-23, 09:17 PM
  #36  
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1982 Medici Pro Strada
I like a set up like I have on this bike for a 2-3 hour ride max. For longer rides I have a taller stem but still like the race geometry due to my long legs and short torso. Most of my classics are race bikes from the era Iím from , the seventies. I am 68.
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Old 04-20-23, 06:00 AM
  #37  
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51 - been back at it for 4 years, getting back into form after looong layoff/back injury.

Riding a 58cm now with "race geometry" and a decent seat/bar height differential. I keep slowly dropping the bars as my fitness improves.

My next frame will be a 56cm with even more of an aggressive position.

The 58 will be my century bike, the 56 will be the fast/short ride bike.
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Old 04-20-23, 06:15 AM
  #38  
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I like older (1960s and 1970s) racing frames, which can accept wider tires and which represent a sweet spot compromise of sportiness and stability.
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Old 04-20-23, 06:39 AM
  #39  
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I like my 1982 Peugeot PXN 10 which was a racing bike back in the day. I used to own a step down model (a PKN 10) that I trained on regularly with all the local racers. The biggest differences from back in the day when I raced are that I run my handlebars a bit higher than I used to, I run a little fatter tires at a little lower pressure (28c rather than 23/25), and I run a little lower gears (48/36 rather than 52/42 up front and a bigger freewheel, 14-28 rather than 13-23).

So yeah get a racing bike if you want but think about (a) position; (b) tire choices; and (c) gearing (which isn't much of an issue on modern bikes but worth thinking about if you like riding hills--I do).


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Old 04-20-23, 07:54 AM
  #40  
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Ď88 Cannondale Criterium Series. I only ride the racers. Even the 1898 Glenwood is a hardcore 125yr old racer built for wood/board tracks.
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Old 04-20-23, 08:50 PM
  #41  
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Oh now I am starting to feel old since I ride an endurance frame. However, the speeds I can maintain on an aero frame with deep section wheels is very similar to my late 40s with the same perceived effort, so I am fine with a more comfortable, less nervous frame which is not quite as responsive in fast tight downhills. The wheels in the picture are not my deep sections (duh).


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Old 04-21-23, 01:28 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by WT21
I put a deposit on a TCR....
Congrats! When does it arrive? Be sure to post pics.
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Old 04-21-23, 01:45 PM
  #43  
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I still race my old Tarmac.






Iíd get a new one but I canít justify it because 1) I have way too many rimbrake wheels and 2) my next new bike will probably be a new TT or CX bike.
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Old 04-21-23, 01:52 PM
  #44  
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Okay here is my road "climbing" race bike. Wait, am I allowed to post two bikes?

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Old 04-23-23, 05:52 AM
  #45  
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About to turn 63 this week and still love riding these road bikes.


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Old 04-23-23, 11:48 AM
  #46  
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“Touring bikes have more rake than road and cyclocross bikes in order to increase their wheelbase length, provide more toe clearance from the front wheel and to increase the fork’s vertical compliance. The product of the head tube angle and the fork rake is the ‘trail’. This is the measurement that gives us the best indication of how fast a bike will steer. Touring bikes have a lot of ‘trail’ to slow steering response and keep heavy loads stable on fast descents.”
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Old 04-23-23, 12:28 PM
  #47  
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Maybe Iím on the wrong thread, Iím 58 and like a fast nervy bike as much as anyone, but I also like big tires and mountain bikes. This year I took a chance getting an inexpensive Sora Cannondale Topstone supposed gravel bike against everyoneís advice, I lowered the handlebar and put on Marathon Plus 38mm tires. If I want to go fast I pedal, the bike responds and I can plough ahead without minding what the pavement looks like. I like my race-oriented endurance road bike with 25-28mm tires but I think Iím having more fun with the heavy duty bike.

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Old 04-23-23, 01:27 PM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by Robert7659
Maybe Iím on the wrong thread, Iím 58 and like a fast nervy bike as much as anyone, but I also like big tires and mountain bikes. This year I took a chance getting an inexpensive Sora Cannondale Topstone supposed gravel bike against everyoneís advice, I lowered the handlebar and put on Marathon Plus 38mm tires. If I want to go fast I pedal, the bike responds and I can plough ahead without minding what the pavement looks like. I like my race-oriented endurance road bike with 25-28mm tires but I think Iím having more fun with the heavy duty bike.
I also recently got an AL Topstone for road riding, though I wasn't offered advice either way. Actually, I didn't think to ask. Anyway, I put on 38mm Gravelking slicks and I'm pretty happy with it. Still getting used to the 46-30 crank but I appreciate the stability, fat tires and comfortable fit. Mid-seventies, have to assume that faculties are diminished. WAG is that it's a couple of mph slower than my former road bikes. I've about aged out of my group anyway so speed is less important.
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Old 04-23-23, 01:45 PM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv
I also recently got an AL Topstone for road riding, though I wasn't offered advice either way. Actually, I didn't think to ask. Anyway, I put on 38mm Gravelking slicks and I'm pretty happy with it. Still getting used to the 46-30 crank but I appreciate the stability, fat tires and comfortable fit. Mid-seventies, have to assume that faculties are diminished. WAG is that it's a couple of mph slower than my former road bikes. I've about aged out of my group anyway so speed is less important.
You might want to lower the handlebar under the 3 little spacers. It makes a big difference to ride quality, handling and speed. With the handlebar lowered, I find the fat tire is compensated by its absorption of surface irregularities.

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Old 04-23-23, 01:50 PM
  #50  
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Yes, I did that after my first ride. It was a skyscraper as delivered.
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