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Bicycling can make our Mind and Body younger, but does it change our Cells?

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Bicycling can make our Mind and Body younger, but does it change our Cells?

Old 08-25-23, 11:27 AM
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A large and robust body of evidence shows that exercise is by far the best thing we have for prolonging health and life. Diet, which is probably #2, doesn't come close in effectiveness.
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Old 08-25-23, 12:49 PM
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Originally Posted by 79pmooney
Several here have pointed out illness, injury, etc/ as factors beyond our control that can drastically affect the aging.
Not exactly, I pointed out that illness, injury, etc/ as factors beyond our control that may affect our ability to exercise IAW the regimens recommended by various "experts" who describe routines that require healthy mind and bodies and the time and resources to devote to the "experts" prescribed way of life. The issue is more like a chicken and egg quandary, and which comes first is not as clear cut as some bicycling/fitness/exercise/nutrition enthusiasts self righteously proclaim.

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Old 08-25-23, 01:31 PM
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Originally Posted by MoAlpha
A large and robust body of evidence shows that exercise is by far the best thing we have for prolonging health and life. Diet, which is probably #2, doesn't come close in effectiveness.
How about number two being not colliding with automobiles or in automobiles as either pedestrian cyclist or Auto driver or passenger? About 40,000 people killed last year and hundreds of thousands injured. Hey, that might even be number one!

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Old 08-25-23, 02:06 PM
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Originally Posted by gobicycling
How about number two being not colliding with automobiles or in automobiles as either pedestrian cyclist or Auto driver or passenger? About 40,000 people killed last year and hundreds of thousands injured. Hey, that might even be number one!
I was concentrating on the "dos," but of course there are a endless "don'ts" with huge effect sizes.
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Old 08-25-23, 02:08 PM
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
Not exactly, I pointed out that illness, injury, etc/ as factors beyond our control that may affect our ability to exercise IAW the regimens recommended by various "experts" who describe routines that require healthy mind and bodies and the time and resources to devote to the "experts" prescribed way of life. The issue is more like a chicken and egg quandary, and which comes first is not as clear cut as some bicycling/fitness/exercise/nutrition enthusiasts self righteously proclaim.
Zip code has a massive effect on life expectancy.
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Old 08-25-23, 02:34 PM
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
Not exactly, I pointed out that illness, injury, etc/ as factors beyond our control that may affect our ability to exercise IAW the regimens recommended by various "experts" who describe routines that require healthy mind and bodies and the time and resources to devote to the "experts" prescribed way of life. The issue is more like a chicken and egg quandary, and which comes first is not as clear cut as some bicycling/fitness/exercise/nutrition enthusiasts self righteously proclaim.
So what is your point exactly? If you are able to do moderately intensive exercise then it has been scientifically proven to reduce your future risk of age related ailments. Those who cannot do exercise due to illness or injury are in trouble. What do you expect the experts to do about it?
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Old 08-25-23, 02:39 PM
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Originally Posted by MoAlpha
A large and robust body of evidence shows that exercise is by far the best thing we have for prolonging health and life. Diet, which is probably #2, doesn't come close in effectiveness.
From what Ive read, especially in recent years, exercise and diet go hand-in-hand. Diet and nutrition certainly affects your ability to exercise in all sorts of ways, including weight management and recovery.
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Old 08-25-23, 02:48 PM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
From what I’ve read, especially in recent years, exercise and diet go hand-in-hand. Diet and nutrition certainly affects your ability to exercise in all sorts of ways, including weight management and recovery.
I think this is true at the extremes of malnutrition and obesity, otherwise any effect of diet on the ability to exercise is negligible. After all, we are talking about the general population, not about athletes here. If exercise were simply mediating large effects of diet on health and longevity, there would be large effects of diet on health and longevity and there aren't.

Poor diet and lack of exercise are certainly associated, but I don't think the relationship is causal in any simple way. Rather, factors in the environment or culture may determine both things.

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Old 08-25-23, 03:37 PM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
So what is your point exactly? If you are able to do moderately intensive exercise then it has been scientifically proven to reduce your future risk of age related ailments. Those who cannot do exercise due to illness or injury are in trouble. What do you expect the experts to do about it?
Well, he does make a point of referring to "experts," in scare quotes, presumably to distinguish them from genuine experts in the field of nutrition science.
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Old 08-25-23, 04:44 PM
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Originally Posted by MoAlpha
I think this is true at the extremes of malnutrition and obesity, otherwise any effect of diet on the ability to exercise is negligible. After all, we are talking about the general population, not about athletes here. If exercise were simply mediating large effects of diet on health and longevity, there would be large effects of diet on health and longevity and there aren't.

Poor diet and lack of exercise are certainly associated, but I don't think the relationship is causal in any simple way. Rather, factors in the environment or culture may determine both things.
The advice about the magical powers of "proper diet and exercise regimens" bandied about by the fitness/performance clique on this list do not consider the general population at all, but rather ARE intended for fitness/athletic health buffs like themselves. Everybody else is just a bunch of lazy fat sad sacks unworthy of consideration.
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Old 08-25-23, 06:31 PM
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
The advice about the magical powers of "proper diet and exercise regimens" bandied about by the fitness/performance clique on this list do not consider the general population at all, but rather ARE intended for fitness/athletic health buffs like themselves. Everybody else is just a bunch of lazy fat sad sacks unworthy of consideration.
I'm sure there are plenty of lazy fat sad sacks in the general population but not on BF. We're all cyclists here, right?
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Old 08-25-23, 07:05 PM
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
The advice about the magical powers of "proper diet and exercise regimens" bandied about by the fitness/performance clique on this list do not consider the general population at all, but rather ARE intended for fitness/athletic health buffs like themselves. Everybody else is just a bunch of lazy fat sad sacks unworthy of consideration.
Well if you read the book I linked earlier you will see that the amount of exercise required for significantly better health and longevity is pretty minimal. Just an average of 15 mins per day of vigorous exercise reduces our chance of death from a heart attack by 40% and all-cause mortality by 45%. The problem is that only 10% of people over the age of 65 actually do that much exercise.
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Old 08-25-23, 07:37 PM
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Originally Posted by MoAlpha
I think this is true at the extremes of malnutrition and obesity, otherwise any effect of diet on the ability to exercise is negligible. After all, we are talking about the general population, not about athletes here. If exercise were simply mediating large effects of diet on health and longevity, there would be large effects of diet on health and longevity and there aren't.

Poor diet and lack of exercise are certainly associated, but I don't think the relationship is causal in any simple way. Rather, factors in the environment or culture may determine both things.
I was thinking more about the reported effects of things like processed red meat on mortality. Together with the excess amount of food we typically consume. Can you really out run (or should I say out cycle) a poor diet?

I take your point about diet not really affecting our ability to exercise enough for significant health benefits.
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Old 08-25-23, 09:21 PM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv
I'm sure there are plenty of lazy fat sad sacks in the general population but not on BF. We're all cyclists here, right?
Not lowly cyclists but Real Cyclists on the 50+ list; all the slowpoke People-on-Bikes and dummies who don't obsess about "proper" cadence, equipment, diet and exercise and racing techniques used in the TDF have been dropped (or should be) from 50+ by the Real Cyclists who roost there.
Performance! That is what 50+ Real Cycling is all about and that requires "proper diet and exercise," eh?
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Old 08-25-23, 11:27 PM
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
Not lowly cyclists but Real Cyclists on the 50+ list; all the slowpoke People-on-Bikes and dummies who don't obsess about "proper" cadence, equipment, diet and exercise and racing techniques used in the TDF have been dropped (or should be) from 50+ by the Real Cyclists who roost there.
Performance! That is what 50+ Real Cycling is all about and that requires "proper diet and exercise," eh?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vn29DvMITu4
The solution is rather simple. Either ignore or skip the posts and threads with which you disagree or find another forum/site that better caters to your needs. Your insufferable whining and negativism is wearing very thin.
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Old 08-26-23, 04:09 AM
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I would second Pete's suggestion to read Sinclair's book and maybe his twitter. They give hope.......

I feel very fortunate to have had a family doctor who was way ahead of the curve on aging and maintaining health matters. When he retired in his early 70's, I knew he still played soccer but he shared with whom he played, and I was like you still play with the 20 something mexican group at the park? He said yes and that he could still run as fast as they. Of course I believed him but it just blew me away. He also looked young and fit.

Sinclair's research says mammals can make themselves younger again.

I'd like to share in case it gives encouragement to others of a certain age. I started back playing ice hockey several months ago (had not played since college). My sprint was awful. Early on during an open hockey practice (pay 20 bucks and go practice), a D3 college kid and a minor league professional (1 step below NHL) were doing up the ice and back sprints, the college kids jokingly says, how about you oldtimer? Want to race? They were (depressingly) three strides ahead of me at the other end. One way to have looked at it, was my muscle cells were old and stiff and there is no change. I needed to stretch to increase my stride length and do sprints to increase explosiveness. And trust that my body would improve. After 6-8 weeks, I noticed a big improvement and one team mate after a game said I had wings on my F'n skates tonight. A week later, I had a race with the pro and he beat me by about a stride and a half and said, "you are flying today". Yesterday, he beat me by half a stride (which is not trivial distance and maybe he was tired). If one looks and trusts Sinclair's research and tries to restore fitness and vitality or maybe call it quality of life in the senior years, I think it is very possible to improve. Obviously, we won't be 20 years old again, but maybe a 65 yo can turn it back to when they were 45-50. Hope isn't a bad thing.

I think the answer is yes.
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Old 08-26-23, 04:45 AM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
I was thinking more about the reported effects of things like processed red meat on mortality. Together with the excess amount of food we typically consume. Can you really out run (or should I say out cycle) a poor diet?

I take your point about diet not really affecting our ability to exercise enough for significant health benefits.
My initial point was that the effect sizes, even for things like red meat, are small overall compared to that of exercise, even if we accept the validity of observational studies as a given. Also, remember that any diet study in an industrialized society is going to be looking at diet against a background of energy overload and sedentary lifestyle, both of which are likely confounders.

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Old 08-26-23, 07:29 AM
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lets keep it civil please people
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Old 08-26-23, 09:10 AM
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I read Sinclair's book and for those that want the Cliff Note's version, listen to the Google talk. Sinclair's work is highly theoretical and needs years of work and study but I found it intellectually interesting. I am a strong believer in the power of epigenetic changes where genes are turned on and off as we age. Why? Great question. And why do some people who have a particular gene always get the disease related to the gene...unless they do not. Study the people who have the gene but do not get the disease and ask why.


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Old 08-26-23, 10:02 AM
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Originally Posted by rsbob
The solution is rather simple. Either ignore or skip the posts and threads with which you disagree or find another forum/site that better caters to your needs. Your insufferable whining and negativism is wearing very thin.
Truth.
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Old 08-26-23, 11:01 AM
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Originally Posted by MoAlpha
A large and robust body of evidence shows that exercise is by far the best thing we have for prolonging health and life. Diet, which is probably #2, doesn't come close in effectiveness.
My personal doctor says that if there were one thing he could prescribe for all of his patients, it would be exercise. He's been a doctor for a long time.
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Old 08-26-23, 11:03 AM
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Here is a recent NYT article that describes the author's take on the benefits of exercise that works for me as well, that does not involve special diets, high intensity or unpleasant workout routines, or setting arbitrary or unnecessary performance goals.

I am curious if there are many, or even any other, 50+ posters who identify with the author's take on the healthy benefits of incorporating their bicycling and other enjoyable relaxed exercise into daily routines for its mental or physical benefits without the motivation or expectation that it will turn back the clock on aging, or enable them to go further and faster, or as a prophylactic against disease.
How I Turned My Errands Into Exercise
Extract:
A month earlier, my 23-year-old minivan broke down for the last time. Rather than replace it, I decided a new “car-free” reality would encourage a healthier lifestyle. My aching muscles questioned the viability of this plan.

Three years later, I now know that giving up my car was the first step toward solving a lifelong struggle: maintaining consistent physical activity. What started as a necessity — I had no car, so I must bike — became a strategy: Errands are an opportunity for exercise.

This reframing turned out to be a motivational bonanza. I began seeking out new errands just for the exercise they would provide. A need for new socks became an opportunity to walk to Target. Running low on Sichuan peppercorns spurred me to cycle the nine-mile round trip to the Chinese supermarket. Earlier this year, I learned that the public library stocked a book about an ancient tomb I was researching, and my first thought was: Excellent, that’s a 4,000-step round trip!

Rain or shine, I became an errand-running machine. My mood improved, my grocery runs got easier and I had to buy a new belt for my shrinking waistline. For most of my adult life, I’d been trying, and failing, to consistently exercise. Only now, as I hit my 60th birthday, did I feel I’d cracked the code.

Experts who study exercise psychology say it was no accident my new errands-based regimen had lasting results. Better yet, what worked for me can work for others.

I am no stranger to motivational gimmicks. After my marriage broke up in the early 2000s, I told myself losing weight would make me more attractive. Mindful of my doctor’s advice about cholesterol, I told myself I was only allowed French fries with dinner if I biked over the nearest hill.

But nothing stuck. Michelle Fortier, a physical activity psychologist at the University of Ottawa, said that outside motivations, like doctors’ warnings and weight insecurities, do not result in lasting behavior change.

“That can get people started,” Dr. Fortier said, “but it will not maintain their physical activity. It doesn’t lead to positive consequences or positive emotions.”

Intrinsically generated motivation, which is driven by a sense of accomplishment or satisfaction, is much more powerful, she said. “You do it because it’s enjoyable,” she said, “And the research shows that type of motivation is good” for exercise maintenance.
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Old 08-26-23, 12:20 PM
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
Here is a recent NYT article that describes the author's take on the benefits of exercise that works for me as well, that does not involve special diets, high intensity or unpleasant workout routines, or setting arbitrary or unnecessary performance goals.

I am curious if there are many, or even any other, 50+ posters who identify with the author's take on the healthy benefits of incorporating their bicycling and other enjoyable relaxed exercise into daily routines for its mental or physical benefits without the motivation or expectation that it will turn back the clock on aging, or enable them to go further and faster, or as a prophylactic against disease.
How I Turned My Errands Into Exercise
Extract:
ILTB and others. I think my viewpoint is well known. Exercise-wise, I do what I enjoy. Right now we are going through some medical challenges with my wife, almost 86yo. This takes a lot of time and energy, as I am pretty much chief chauffeur, cook, gardener and bottle washer for both of us. Nevertheless, this morning, I attended a 1 hour intensive aqua-aerobic activity, which I very much enjoyed. I agree on using the bicycle and walking for all possible errands. My bike computer batteries all died a couple of years ago, and I never replaced them. I have no annual mileage goals, nor do I track anything. My weight is right on at 160, BP is fine. I have one "orphan" and one "rare" disease, both "unfixable", with which I live and tolerate. Yet, I still bicycle, swim and walk, along with a good regimen of stretching and resistance, along with trying to eat appropriately.

Still, I learn things of interest in this forum. I understand that others are quite different, and I applaud that. The world is made of many different types of personalities. BRAVO!! So, I participate to the extent I can and enjoy, and read other's perspectives on life with interest. If I was fighting and publicly disagreeing all the time, I would leave. Joe and I started this forum. I think I will stick around awhile.

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Old 08-26-23, 01:12 PM
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A group of bicyclists that had actively been doing long distance rides over a period of decades was studied and they found that these men had the bodies of men 30 years younger. I suspect that these men had healthier lifestyles overall with regard to smoking, alcohol consumption, and eating real foods.
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Old 08-26-23, 02:19 PM
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
Here is a recent NYT article that describes the author's take on the benefits of exercise that works for me as well, that does not involve special diets, high intensity or unpleasant workout routines, or setting arbitrary or unnecessary performance goals.

I am curious if there are many, or even any other, 50+ posters who identify with the author's take on the healthy benefits of incorporating their bicycling and other enjoyable relaxed exercise into daily routines for its mental or physical benefits without the motivation or expectation that it will turn back the clock on aging, or enable them to go further and faster, or as a prophylactic against disease.
How I Turned My Errands Into Exercise
Extract:
I think there was a concession earlier in this thread that it takes a modest amount of exercise per week to obtain much of the benefits. I would look up the studies but you are not interested. I do not read the NYT and the point of the article is obvious. I just think you are in the wrong thread. My wife volunteers at a food bank and a guy there is 102, he still dances competitively, has a massive garden, drives, walks and is very active. You probably would like him a lot. He looks 65.
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